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mickal555
2007-Jun-17, 09:09 AM
Whats the deal?

We don't have such a thing here- everything is so expensive as it is I can't imagine having to pay an extra 10%.

How does it work? Sounds so strange to me.

Michael Noonan
2007-Jun-17, 10:16 AM
Posted by mickal555

Whats the deal?

We don't have such a thing here- everything is so expensive as it is I can't imagine having to pay an extra 10%.

How does it work? Sounds so strange to me.

From what I understand and I am Australian too, is that it is a payment for service. This is the bit I don't understand though, we have GST a "Goods and Services Tax" collected by our government.

Apparently a tip is to guarantee a better level of service. Maybe it does work in other countries. What I would like to know is that since our government collects this tip is what have we received as a better good or service?

Gillianren
2007-Jun-17, 10:42 AM
My understanding is that you lot pay tips, too, but the company factors it into your bill.

The concept of tipping goes back some time; exactly who gets tipped and how much is obviously the subject of much debate, though it is generally acknowledged in the US that a proper tip for a waiter/waitress is 15%. A tip is your way of showing appreciation to the underpaid minions. In the US, it's hardly uncommon for "waitstaff" to get minimum wage (here in Washington, that's currently $7.93 an hour, well above federal--$5.15 at the moment but scheduled to go up soon). In fact, in some states, the wage for people who may reasonably expect to get tips is far lower than minimum wage for anyone else.

I, personally, would rather that companies paid their waitstaff better than that these poor working stiffs had to rely on people who think 5% is generous and more than they deserve. However, I don't see that happening any time soon; tipping is pretty entrenched in our culture.

sarongsong
2007-Jun-17, 10:44 AM
Whats the deal?It's an American gimmick to compensate employees to make up for the fact few, if any, employers in the food and beverage end of the hotel & restaurant industry pay a living wage---most tipping positions start at minimum wage here, with grudgingly allowed raises based on seniority. Tips are supposed to be reported as 'income' on the employees' annual Income Statements and are taxed accordingly. Leads to quite a bit of creative accounting.

Tog
2007-Jun-17, 10:51 AM
Here in Utah, not only is minimum wage for servers about 1/2 of the federal rate, the IRS assumes an average tip of 10% of the bill come tax time. This means that if your bill comes to $20, the the server will be taxed on $2 of that no matter how much they really got. Our restaurant tax is just about 7.5% so it's a basic rule of thumb to just double the tax. The tip goes down for poor service and up of the were really good.

A recent example of really bad: The GF went out with a friend from work. They each paid for their meal with a $20. The server said that she didn't have any "Changy change", so she just shorted each of them the difference to make the dollars amounts even. You also tip barbers, taxi drivers, hotel staff in places other than where I work, pizza delivery drivers, etc.

mickal555
2007-Jun-17, 01:15 PM
Oh


How about cow tipping?

hhEb09'1
2007-Jun-17, 01:23 PM
How about cow tipping?I've found that a 20% tip is enough to ensure the desired results

Doodler
2007-Jun-17, 01:25 PM
Some New York restaurants have started getting out of the gratuity business and into flat salaries for wait staff. They're not bad salaries, actually, but they're still whining because in the high dollar restaurants, the tips can be pretty astounding.

The issue there is parity with the kitchen staff. Waiters just serve it, the people doing the hard work are getting comparative peanuts.

Delvo
2007-Jun-17, 02:54 PM
Tips tend to reveal something about the person who's tipping. There are LOTS and LOTS of people who apparently figure nobody's really paying attention so they can get away with paying less than the "standard". As a result of this and the level of abuse I know waiters & waitresses get from some customers, I tend to deliberately tip 50% or more just because I know it will brighten someone's morning/evening/whatever when the tip is discovered. There are other big tippers, too, but in most of their cases, it's done highly visibly to show off what great tippers they are or how rich they are, whereas I sneak it by and get out quickly to avoid being caught; I hate being thanked or having too much attention drawn to me.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-17, 03:22 PM
Tips tend to reveal something about the person who's tipping. There are LOTS and LOTS of people who apparently figure nobody's really paying attention so they can get away with paying less than the "standard". As a result of this and the level of abuse I know waiters & waitresses get from some customers, I tend to deliberately tip 50% or more just because I know it will brighten someone's morning/evening/whatever when the tip is discovered. There are other big tippers, too, but in most of their cases, it's done highly visibly to show off what great tippers they are or how rich they are, whereas I sneak it by and get out quickly to avoid being caught; I hate being thanked or having too much attention drawn to me.

I'll tip a lot more than 20% if the bill is small, like a cup of coffee at a diner - I'll tip 100% or more.

hhEb09'1
2007-Jun-17, 03:27 PM
I'll tip 100% or more.Sometimes do even better than that. If someone hands me my coat, I might tip...

what's 1/0 again?

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-17, 03:33 PM
Sometimes do even better than that. If someone hands me my coat, I might tip...

what's 1/0 again?

A program exception? :lol:

Musashi
2007-Jun-17, 03:52 PM
Just remember that wherever waitstaff are getting paid less than minimum wage the employer is legally obliged to make up the difference if the tips do not cover it.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-17, 03:55 PM
Just remember that wherever waitstaff are getting paid less than minimum wage the employer is legally obliged to make up the difference if the tips do not cover it.

If tips don't bring a sevice person up to minimum wage, they need to get another job - no one can do anything more than exist on minimum wage.

Musashi
2007-Jun-17, 04:21 PM
I agree, I just didn't want there to be any confusion about people taking home less then min wage.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-17, 04:37 PM
Just remember that wherever waitstaff are getting paid less than minimum wage the employer is legally obliged to make up the difference if the tips do not cover it.

While I'm sure that's true (in Washington, there is no lower minimum wage for employees expected to get tips), how is that regulated? How well is it regulated?

As to the people in the kitchen doing the hard work, it depends on what you consider the hard work. Dealing with some of the jerks I've seen in restaurants is definitely hard work. I've certainly encountered waitresses who thought dealing with groups I've been in (we do get kind of loud, though we're always friendly and we tip really well; we just think we're funnier than we are, though always in polite ways) have been hard work.

And there's the running around, the carrying--I could never be a waitress simply because of my back problems--no, I think being a waiter/waitress is very much hard work. It's just a different kind.

The Supreme Canuck
2007-Jun-17, 05:05 PM
It's an American gimmick to compensate employees to make up for the fact few, if any, employers in the food and beverage end of the hotel & restaurant industry pay a living wage---most tipping positions start at minimum wage here, with grudgingly allowed raises based on seniority. Tips are supposed to be reported as 'income' on the employees' annual Income Statements and are taxed accordingly. Leads to quite a bit of creative accounting.

As I pointed out in the other thread, this is untrue. Tipping is standard practise in Canada as well.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-17, 05:37 PM
And the practice started in Europe. Besides, Sarongsong, are you willing to pay more for meals so that restaurant employees can get higher wages?

Parrothead
2007-Jun-17, 06:30 PM
Then there are places that include a 15% gratuity, when they bring you your bill. Service at those places, can be worse than places where tipping is optional. The total of GST and PST used to equal 15% (it's now 14%), so tipping was just a matter of matching that amount.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-17, 07:10 PM
Many years ago, I moonlighted as a drink waiter. All tips were shared with the bartender. Sometimes, I bussed tables. The wait staff split the tips with me and of course the cooks. We all worked together and shared alike. If the bartender was slow filling my drink orders, my tips went down. If I was slow bussing a table, the waitress wouldn't have as many customers per hour so her tips went down. If the food wasn't good, her tips went down. In a good place, a person can make many times the minimum wage in tip income on a busy night. It motivates people to hustle and give good service. Go to a good restaurant where the wait staff are experienced and you'll see people who know how to make for a fine dining experience. It isn't easy but the good ones can make a descent living at it.

Jim
2007-Jun-17, 08:53 PM
Just remember that wherever waitstaff are getting paid less than minimum wage the employer is legally obliged to make up the difference if the tips do not cover it.

Yeah... sure.

My daughter worked for a short time as a waitress. She was paid 1/2 of the federal minimum wage. When she received her W2, her employer "credited" her with full minimum wage, on the assumption that her tips made up the difference.

They didn't, but how do you prove a negative? How do you prove that your tips did not add up to the assumed amount? Get a receipt from every customer?

BTW, she waited on a local tv news personality one time. He was very highly regarded in the community... a pillar... admired... beloved...

And he stiffed her.

Tinaa
2007-Jun-17, 09:30 PM
A couple of websites I have become aware of:
http://www.tipthepizzaguy.com/
http://www.tipping.org

Both of my daughters work for the public; one at Domino's and one at Schlitterbahn in New Braunfels. I tell them it is good for them to see how people treat others so that they can know how not to act.

Musashi
2007-Jun-17, 10:51 PM
Yeah... sure.

My daughter worked for a short time as a waitress. She was paid 1/2 of the federal minimum wage. When she received her W2, her employer "credited" her with full minimum wage, on the assumption that her tips made up the difference.

They didn't, but how do you prove a negative? How do you prove that your tips did not add up to the assumed amount? Get a receipt from every customer?

BTW, she waited on a local tv news personality one time. He was very highly regarded in the community... a pillar... admired... beloved...

And he stiffed her.
I am under the impression that the employer would have to verify that the tips made up the difference, not the other way around. However, one way that tipping jobs do get screwed is that they are taxed as if they received a tip of (I think) 15% regardless of what the actual tip was (and also regardless of the fact that they do not keep the full amount of the tip anyway.

However, it seems to me like it would be very difficult for one's tips to not push a person over the minimum wage. I worked expediting food for a few months and I cannot remember a single shift I made under minimum wage from tips alone. Some nights I would make $16+/hour in tips. And my tips were some percentage of the tips that the servers made.

That said, I have no problem with the idea that servers should be paid at least minimum wage (plus tips). I was just pointing out that , technically, they should already be getting that. Practically, they should be making a lot more. Remember, there are loads of people that get paid merely minimum wage and no one seems to care that they don't get to make tips.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-17, 10:59 PM
I've found that a 20% tip is enough to ensure the desired results


Yup, I usually tip about 20% for food service at restaurants or for service at a bar. I usually tip manicurists and hairstylists about 30-40%; I tip more if the person is question does a consistently good job. I usually tip cabdrivers and delivery guys about 5-10%.

I'm not saying that is what one should or shouldn't do. This is just my own personal rule. :)

Frantic Freddie
2007-Jun-18, 12:06 AM
I tip well for good service.At my local bar it's $1 per drink,that works out to 20-25%.I also play there & get free drinks,but on those nights I get my drinks from the bar & since we play for tips,all the odd $s go to the girls.

Week before last we were down in Port Aransas visitin' my brother & we ate at his restaurant (he's the owner) & while my brother called his manager & told him dinner was on the house,that didn't mean that we could stiff the waitress.We paid about 70-80% of our dinner in tips,so it was a bargain for us.

We don't go out much,live too far from places to eat,so fast food places are out,has to be a restaurant.Good service can be 25%,bad 0,along with a complaint.

My brother is 3rd generation in the business & very successful....Ain't a restaurant in the world that could hire me.

pzkpfw
2007-Jun-18, 12:46 AM
Tipping was invented for use by sitcoms.

Jens
2007-Jun-18, 03:02 AM
And the practice started in Europe. Besides, Sarongsong, are you willing to pay more for meals so that restaurant employees can get higher wages?

I think the reality is that in general, the total price will come to something roughly equivalent, i.e. what the market allows. And the same with staff wages. In the US, wages for waiters and waitresses are low because of the expectation that they will receive tips. And in Asia they are somewhat higher because there is no such expectation. But in fact, the total wage will end up being close to what the market sets; otherwise people would not do the job. And the same with meals. One would presume that in a country with no tips, the price of the meal will be somewhat higher, and in fact the employer will be using that extra money to pay for the slightly higher staff wages.

The presumed advantage of the tipping scheme is that it makes the waiters and waitresses more polite. I don't know if it really does, because for example, in Japan there are no tips and still waiting staff tend to be very polite. So there's somewhat more to it than just the tips.

In a sense, it's like sales commissions.

lpgeorge123
2007-Jun-18, 03:31 AM
The issue there is parity with the kitchen staff. Waiters just serve it, the people doing the hard work are getting comparative peanuts.

I know lots of people don't like tipping servers for "doing their job." I worked as a server and in takeout. In some restaurants the servers don't do much, just bring out the food, or in some cases, they just take your drinks and someone else brings out the food. In other cases they do a lot of work.

Where I was serving, I did a lot of prep work (like filling sauce containers), washed the dishes, cleaned the dining room, and made my own drinks as well as served the food. Sometimes it was tough to juggle all of that, especially during the dinner rush. It was always really nice when someone would leave a large tip.


They each paid for their meal with a $20. The server said that she didn't have any "Changy change", so she just shorted each of them the difference to make the dollars amounts even.

This I can explain too (though I still find it kinda dishonest). 9 times out of 10, when a diner gets coins back in their change, they leave the coins as part of the tip. So a lot of servers don't use change. I never used pennies. I would round the change amount up. Some people I worked with would only use quarters, and some didn't use coins at all. If I had been that server who didn't have "changy change," I would have rounded the change up, giving the diners a few extra cents back instead of short changing them. Seems nicer to do it that way.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-18, 03:36 AM
Originally Posted by mickal555 http://www.bautforum.com/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=1010106#post1010106)
How about cow tipping?I've found that a 20% tip is enough to ensure the desired resultsMy grandfather always averred that, compared to cow tipping, outhouse tipping was a lot more fun...especially if one's timing was right.

Whirlpool
2007-Jun-18, 05:11 AM
I am not a regular tipper .

If I'm delighted with the excellent service that is given to me , then I will be delighted too to give a tip to them.


:)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-18, 05:18 AM
That said, I have no problem with the idea that servers should be paid at least minimum wage (plus tips). I was just pointing out that , technically, they should already be getting that. Practically, they should be making a lot more. Remember, there are loads of people that get paid merely minimum wage and no one seems to care that they don't get to make tips.

I want them to make more money, too. Does that help?

When I worked in fast food ten years ago, the company policy was that we were not allowed to accept tips. The guy who owned the boat store next door was quite adept at slipping us dollars on the sly. We loved him and treated him better than any other customer we ever had.

Dr Strangelove
2007-Jun-18, 06:24 AM
I want them to make more money, too. Does that help?

When I worked in fast food ten years ago, the company policy was that we were not allowed to accept tips. The guy who owned the boat store next door was quite adept at slipping us dollars on the sly. We loved him and treated him better than any other customer we ever had.

It's the same with government officials. They're not allowed to accept tips, but if you surreptitiously slip them one anyway, they'll treat you better than everyone else.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 08:15 AM
man I forgot about this. It's been nearly a year since I paid a real tip. People here thank you for 50 cents.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-18, 10:31 AM
It's the same with government officials. They're not allowed to accept tips, but if you surreptitiously slip them one anyway, they'll treat you better than everyone else.

WHOA! They aren't supposed to do that! :confused::confused:

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-18, 10:50 AM
WHOA! They aren't supposed to do that! :confused::confused:

:lol:

Like that would ever stop them

Swift
2007-Jun-18, 01:35 PM
Yup, I usually tip about 20% for food service at restaurants or for service at a bar. I usually tip manicurists and hairstylists about 30-40%; I tip more if the person is question does a consistently good job. I usually tip cabdrivers and delivery guys about 5-10%.

I'm not saying that is what one should or shouldn't do. This is just my own personal rule. :)
I also generally tip well, though my baseline for food service is 15%. But, if the food and service are especially good, I have gone over 25%, and on very big bills. But it is also a punishment and will tip less for appropriately poor food or service.

About the worst was a chain italian restaurant that used to be around the Cleveland area. My wife and I were there one night, the service was mediocre up to the point where we got our food. We never saw our waiter again - no "is everything ok", never refilled our drinks, etc. I actually had to go up to the front desk and get a manager to get our bill. I did not leave a 0% tip, I left about 12 cents in pennies - I wanted to make sure they didn't think I just forgot, I wanted them to know that I had carefully thought about it and this is what their service was worth. I also never went back.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 04:30 PM
we had one like that once. went to a Mexican food restaurant one night with friends. the greeter seated us and brought drinks. then a person took our order. we never saw that person again. much too late another person brought us our food. then nothing. we had to find the chip person to get us a check.

that place had crayons for children. I got one and wrote on a clean plate in crayon "no service, no tip"

before we left a very angry waiter came running after us. he demanded to know what that was all about. We explained that 3 other people had helped us more than he and he would be getting nothing.

That place didn't last long.

sarongsong
2007-Jun-18, 06:40 PM
...I did not leave a 0% tip, I left about 12 cents in pennies...Two dull pennies are the 'traditional' silent messenger; one shiney penny (left atop folding money or with the signed CC authorization that includes the tip) conveys "Outstanding service!"

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-18, 09:38 PM
That place didn't last long.

Good!!

There are plenty of places here in DC with lousy service which last for ages.

I have also never gotten prompt service anywhere I've eaten in NYC. I don't know whether I've just had bad luck (in server or in restaurant) or whether bad service is just characteristic of restaurants in NYC. I would suspect the former to be true.

sarongsong
2007-Jun-18, 10:15 PM
From what I understand...[tipping] is a payment for service.To Insure Prompt Service is the idea.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-18, 10:22 PM
To Insure Prompt Service is the idea.

I think that originally it was paid up front and then evolved into paying it afterwards.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 10:53 PM
Good!!

There are plenty of places here in DC with lousy service which last for ages.

I have also never gotten prompt service anywhere I've eaten in NYC. I don't know whether I've just had bad luck (in server or in restaurant) or whether bad service is just characteristic of restaurants in NYC. I would suspect the former to be true.



probably for different reasons but it's also hard to get fast service here in Germany or in France.

I think the idea is that after the meal people stay for sometimes hours. the waiters expect that and don't pressure you to leave. - of course that is a pain when you're in a hurry and want to pay and leave.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-18, 10:57 PM
I think the idea is that after the meal people stay for sometimes hours. the waiters expect that and don't pressure you to leave.

That is one of the things I miss from my year's stay in Switzerland. You could go into a restaurant, eat, have a couple of cups of coffee, pretty much hang out for an hour or so, and no one 'pestered' you to leave.

Swift
2007-Jun-19, 02:49 AM
probably for different reasons but it's also hard to get fast service here in Germany or in France.

I think the idea is that after the meal people stay for sometimes hours. the waiters expect that and don't pressure you to leave. - of course that is a pain when you're in a hurry and want to pay and leave.
That is certainly true in France. Meals are supposed to be leisurely and the fancier the restaurant, the more so.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-19, 03:26 AM
To Insure Prompt Service is the idea.

[etymological rant]

You know, I am getting awfully tired of seeing that little bit in books proclaiming to tell word origins. It's one of three or four words I look for in a book before I'll buy it; if it claims any word (other than radar or scuba, for rare examples) is an acronym, I don't buy the book. If the word is from the 20th Century, it might be an acronym; if it's older, it isn't.

[/etymological rant]

LurchGS
2007-Jun-19, 03:45 AM
I do seem to be in the minority. I tip according to the service I get - and, sadly, that does include the quality of the food (though I'm much more inclined to call the waitstaff and complain until it's fixed. Sometimes, though, you just can't rescue it from the dumpster)

If the waitperson is pleasantly professional, and just 'does his job', he'll get 15%. If service is bad, the tip goes down. If the service is better, the tip goes up.

I *NEVER* leave no tip. If service is exceptionally bad, I leave a 1 cent tip. I refuse to reward bad behavior, and a 1 cent tip sends a very explicit message. It says, in no uncertain terms, "you suck". I'd prefer to leave *no* tip, but as has been mentioned elsewhere, some people don't tip at all - you can't tell if it's a comment or stupidity.

There was a place in California, of all places, that I remember fondly from 30 years ago. My then-not-wife and I ate there every weekend. We soon settled on a particular waitress as our favorite, and would - if we got there early - wait for her to come on duty. Yes, we tipped well. Generally about 50% - which came to about $20 per meal. Just before we moved out of the area, we ate there one last time - and tipped the waitress $100.

Sure, it made the other waitstaff unhappy. Tough. They had their chance when we first started eating there.

Finally, for those establishments that add the gratuity to the check - not giving me the choice - I don't ever eat there again. This is called "voting with your feet".

sarongsong
2007-Jun-19, 04:14 AM
[etymological rant]...Hmmh, I've never read anywhere that is where the word came from, simply a convenient after-the-fact acronym; a mantra drilled into hotel/restaurant employees by their managers. Look for the Head Bellman (Bell Captain) any time you're in a fancy-schmancy hotel---he (I've yet to find a female in that position) is usually the King of the Gratuity-Receivers of the entire establishment.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-19, 07:07 AM
Hmmh, I've never read anywhere that is where the word came from, simply a convenient after-the-fact acronym; a mantra drilled into hotel/restaurant employees by their managers. Look for the Head Bellman (Bell Captain) any time you're in a fancy-schmancy hotel---he (I've yet to find a female in that position) is usually the King of the Gratuity-Receivers of the entire establishment.

Oh, about half the etymology books on the market claim it to be true. Also "posh" being an acronym of "port out starboard home" and one or two that I can't mention here. Again, it's a sign of shoddy research, so I then know not to buy the book.

cbacba
2007-Jun-19, 07:31 AM
It's an American gimmick to compensate employees to make up for the fact few, if any, employers in the food and beverage end of the hotel & restaurant industry pay a living wage---most tipping positions start at minimum wage here, with grudgingly allowed raises based on seniority. Tips are supposed to be reported as 'income' on the employees' annual Income Statements and are taxed accordingly. Leads to quite a bit of creative accounting.

Actually, a tip is a part of one's salary which is based solely on merit and determined and paid directly by the customer being served. Since it is paid after the service is delivered, it's not an attempt to bribe or get the server to perform better but rather payment for service rendered.

In the food industry where tipping is the most commonplace, liklihood of business failure is quite high, even with subminimum wage pay requirements for servers. Ascertaining performance of servers is also far more difficult than for other employees with rather fixed locations and responsibilities as well. Attempting to increase costs there run one up against fast food restaurants where there is no equivalent function as a food server and also against the alternative of carryout and of eating home prepared food.

Consequently, one doesn't have to dine out and can either eat at home or go fill their own drinks at the soda fountain and eat a plastic burger and artery slugs every day for lunch and dinner. In finer restaurants, mediocre to good servers would be stuck making near minimum wage rather than several times that amount.

Doodler
2007-Jun-19, 02:08 PM
Oh


How about cow tipping?

Wouldn't suggest it. Cows have a weird sense of vengeance.

http://www.channel3000.com/news/13525617/detail.html?qs=1;bp=t

Argos
2007-Jun-19, 02:43 PM
I hate paying extra cash for people doing what´s supposed to be their duty.

Down here adding 10% to the receipt is a [regrettable] national institution.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-19, 03:51 PM
Oh, about half the etymology books on the market claim it to be true. Also "posh" being an acronym of "port out starboard home" and one or two that I can't mention here. Again, it's a sign of shoddy research, so I then know not to buy the book.

how many of those do you have?


do they cover different topics?



I have lots of books on the space program, especially the Apollo years. They are all very different because of the perspectives and material. I wonder if your books also have differences?




I have an aunt that has a very large library. She reads several books per week and only buys, never checks. She has been doing this longer than I have been alive. Also she doesn't like to reread books. Anyway, part of this enormous collection are book cases full of recipe books, (not the ones she reads for entertainment). She may use one recipe ouf of each book and then put it on the shelf until there is no more shelf space, then she buys more shelves. I wouldn't be a bit suprised if many of those recipes are the same.

The Supreme Canuck
2007-Jun-19, 05:17 PM
I do seem to be in the minority. I tip according to the service I get

Sounds like what I do - and though I don't do the one cent thing, I'm going to start. I generally leave no tip for horrible service, but a penny is a much better commentary, for the reasons you mentioned.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-19, 06:52 PM
how many of those do you have?


do they cover different topics?

Oh, I've got perhaps a dozen; there's some overlap, but there are, after all, a lot of words out there. Further, two of them are more about phrases than words and five of them, give or take, are not merely etymology but grammar and usage as well. (Yay, Safire!)

As to your aunt's cookbooks, yes, there are probably quite a few foods that are listed in more than one cookbook, but not all the recipes will be the same. Bread, for example--there are probably hundreds of bread recipes, all of which will give you a slightly different finished product. I would be very surprised if many of the recipes were exactly the same. I still think it's wasteful to keep those books if she's not going to reread them; more books for the rest of us!