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crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 10:42 AM
yea, I realize no accents...



I'm writing a resume for a scientific position in the States - as I will be back soon. I always list activities and clubs in case the interviewer is interested in what I am interested. I spend enough time here on this site that it is a little of both and I am considering listing is as so.

Has anyone ever put BAUT on their resume before?

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-18, 02:34 PM
yea, I realize no accents...



I'm writing a resume for a scientific position in the States - as I will be back soon. I always list activities and clubs in case the interviewer is interested in what I am interested. I spend enough time here on this site that it is a little of both and I am considering listing is as so.

Has anyone ever put BAUT on their resume before?

I didn't when I updated my resume recently, but I don't really have a lot of that type of thing to put down. (I never got around to joining AAS, even.)

However, if you're putting things like clubs and activities and such down, I think that mentioning BAUT would fit. I think that this bulletin board would qualify as an internet equivalent of a club. I'm not sure if an employer would see that, though. However, I would be careful putting internet sites that you like to visit on a resume. If you go advertising that you visit a site multiple times per day, that might leave the impression that you will spend time there during work. Whether or not you would, you don't want to let a search committee think that you would. It's a tough choice.

Moose
2007-Jun-18, 02:47 PM
I would be very hesitant (read: not even on a double-dog-dare with money on the table) to admit to internet use on a resume'. Even an astronomy board. If there's room for someone to take the worst interpretation (internet junkie), someone will take the worst interpretation. There's too much competition out there to take chances like this.

Worse, it's already far too easy to dig up information on people on the net. Information you may have long forgotten is out there that may be embarrassing to you if taken out of context. The last thing you want to do is make this easier than it already is.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 04:22 PM
yea, they could check this site and see what's up.


just an idea. I have plenty of other things to put on there, but not so many recently.

torque of the town
2007-Jun-18, 04:31 PM
take the worst interpretation




Men in black suites wearing shades would come looking for you.....

Moose
2007-Jun-18, 04:36 PM
Men in black suites wearing shades would come looking for you.....

That's only if you happen to drop you've been a moderator for GLP.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-18, 04:42 PM
Men in black suites wearing shades would come looking for you.....

...And in the closets of those suites are black suits. ;)

suntrack2
2007-Jun-18, 05:26 PM
crosscountry, its a really great idea. :) to keep it(BAUT) up in the resume, it will enhance the big chances of more good things, I like your idea, you are great in thinking.

Delvo
2007-Jun-18, 06:38 PM
I would be very hesitant (read: not even on a double-dog-dare with money on the table) to admit to internet use on a resume'. Even an astronomy board.Internet "use" isn't an issue by itself, but when it's given as part of the definition of a person's identity, it's beyond mere "use". It brings to mind not only stereotypes of pathetic losers and addicts, but also a prime way employees have been known to waste employers' time and resources on the job.

And beyond that, even if it weren't the internet we're talking about, what you say is part of why it's actually bad to mention personal hobbies in a job hunt at all. ANY hobby can conjure images to other people of someone taking it too far, or remind someone of a type of person they dislike in general, or just happen to be an activity that someone severely disrespects. Their interpretation is too far beyond your control to gamble on.

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-18, 06:39 PM
...And in the closets of those suites are black suits. ;)
Which they hopefully put on before they come looking for you.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-18, 07:26 PM
Internet "use" isn't an issue by itself, but when it's given as part of the definition of a person's identity, it's beyond mere "use". It brings to mind not only stereotypes of pathetic losers and addicts, but also a prime way employees have been known to waste employers' time and resources on the job.

And beyond that, even if it weren't the internet we're talking about, what you say is part of why it's actually bad to mention personal hobbies in a job hunt at all. ANY hobby can conjure images to other people of someone taking it too far, or remind someone of a type of person they dislike in general, or just happen to be an activity that someone severely disrespects. Their interpretation is too far beyond your control to gamble on.



ok, not speaking about the internet anymore, but I feel a little insight into the type of person away from work can be an important factor.


but then again I've never landed a dream job.

torque of the town
2007-Jun-18, 11:01 PM
...And in the closets of those suites are black suits. ;)




nothing is as scary as a dude in a black suite....

suntrack2
2007-Jun-19, 04:59 PM
men in black was a hollywood's superhit movie, it was great and in all whole story was new and different.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 05:31 PM
Boy am I glad that I'll never have to work up a resume again.

Of course, that means that my next stop is pushing up daisies.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-19, 06:59 PM
you'd better write a good resume if you want that good a position ;)

Fazor
2007-Jun-19, 08:00 PM
I think you're all correct about the dangers of putting "BAUT" on your resume in relation to perception of internet use.

However you don't have to say that it's a website. Just say that you're a member of BAUT, an astronomy enthuesist group. If asked, you can mention that they have a website. But if you play it as a community of individuals with similar interests (which it is) there's nothing bad about that.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 08:38 PM
you'd better write a good resume if you want that good a position ;)

The big sleep requires a resume? Oh damn - red tape till the end. :)

Noclevername
2007-Jun-19, 08:39 PM
The big sleep requires a resume? Oh damn - red tape till the end. :)


And more Red Tape for your loved ones after! :doh:

Amber Robot
2007-Jun-19, 08:42 PM
What kind of "scientific position" are you applying for? And why do you think listing BAUT Forum would increase your chances of getting the job?

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 08:48 PM
I think you're all correct about the dangers of putting "BAUT" on your resume in relation to perception of internet use.

However you don't have to say that it's a website. Just say that you're a member of BAUT, an astronomy enthuesist group. If asked, you can mention that they have a website. But if you play it as a community of individuals with similar interests (which it is) there's nothing bad about that.

Of course, if your user ID is The Weedster you might not want to mention the website. :lol:

Doodler
2007-Jun-19, 09:52 PM
I would be very hesitant (read: not even on a double-dog-dare with money on the table) to admit to internet use on a resume'. Even an astronomy board. If there's room for someone to take the worst interpretation (internet junkie), someone will take the worst interpretation. There's too much competition out there to take chances like this.

That's a little defeatist.

It would be like looking at someone who puts "Boyscout Troop Leader" on their resume as a potential pedophile...

"Active in church" would translate to "Bible thumping nut who'll demand prayers at company functions".

"Military reservist" would become "will need excessive time off of work".


If the person reading your resume starts down that avenue of thought looking to twist everything you say to the negative, its probably better not to work for them anyway.

LurchGS
2007-Jun-19, 09:58 PM
If I ever assemble another resume, I'll almost certainly include BAUT. As an employer for a tech-savvy company, I look for internet-based interests and hobbies on my prospective employees. It makes no difference as far as the hiring process goes - it's merely a matter of interest.

Doodler
2007-Jun-19, 10:02 PM
Computer gaming actually helped me along after the fact, because the skills it takes to fix gaming rigs pushed beyond the limit are pretty much the same skills it takes to fix someone's booboo in the office.

The ability to quickly find information on the net is a big help too.

Moose
2007-Jun-19, 10:21 PM
That's a little defeatist.

It's how it was explained to me by a prospective employer who couldn't hire at the time, but pulled a bunch of strings on my behalf. He also gave me some very good corrective advice on my resumé.


It would be like looking at someone who puts "Boyscout Troop Leader" on their resume as a potential pedophile...

"Active in church" would translate to "Bible thumping nut who'll demand prayers at company functions".

"Military reservist" would become "will need excessive time off of work".

Silly, isn't it? But yes, your straw men aside, this really does happen in the real world. It's for the same reason you don't put your age, gender or physical characteristics on a resumé. This is irrelevant information (or should be.)

I had one prospect come right out and ask my marital status, then say flat out he intended to stiff me on salary because I was unmarried. Married people, according to him, needed a larger salary. I wouldn't have accepted the position had he offered it. The person who gave me the lead was disgusted by the incident when I relayed it.

Generally speaking, you're best to stick with facts that prominently display your relevant skills, education and applicable experience without burying that information under a lot of trivia. Many employers will only skim a resumé for keywords until the interview anyway.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-19, 11:03 PM
It's how it was explained to me by a prospective employer who couldn't hire at the time, but pulled a bunch of strings on my behalf. He also gave me some very good corrective advice on my resumé.



Silly, isn't it? But yes, your straw men aside, this really does happen in the real world. It's for the same reason you don't put your age, gender or physical characteristics on a resumé. This is irrelevant information (or should be.)



I may be younger than most people here but I don't see why age or gender or even physical characteristics are irrelevant.

Now don't get me wrong; discrimination is bad in any case, but a person with bad burns on his face probably wouldn't be the best car salesman. And a 20 year old just won't fill Bob Barker's shoes on the price is right. About gender I can think of one, maybe more if pushed, example where men are more qualified than women. But that goes more to physical characteristics more than gender.

I currently do have my DOB on my resume and I think it's going to stay there.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-19, 11:05 PM
What kind of "scientific position" are you applying for? And why do you think listing BAUT Forum would increase your chances of getting the job?



well none actually that BAUT will help me. It was just a question. I listed the Astronomy club I'm in and considered this group at least partially similar.



The position involves calibrating and repairing MRI machines and other medical equipment.

Delvo
2007-Jun-20, 12:34 AM
What kind of "scientific position" are you applying for? And why do you think listing BAUT Forum would increase your chances of getting the job?You might not be familiar with the idea of personal hobbies and pastimes being on résumés. The idea is not that any particular personal trait or quirk will help you get the job, but that you're letting the employers get to know you personally, and doing THAT will help you get the job. But it's not very common at all in this country and might not exist in others.

Amber Robot
2007-Jun-20, 12:39 AM
You might not be familiar with the idea of personal hobbies and pastimes being on résumés.

You are right that I'm definitely not familiar with that. That is why I asked what kind of position it was. I've applied for "scientific positions" and I never would have considered putting anything like hobbies, etc. on my CV.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Jun-20, 02:07 AM
About gender I can think of one, maybe more if pushed, example where men are more qualified than women.
Sperm donor.

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-20, 05:00 AM
You might not be familiar with the idea of personal hobbies and pastimes being on résumés. The idea is not that any particular personal trait or quirk will help you get the job, but that you're letting the employers get to know you personally, and doing THAT will help you get the job. But it's not very common at all in this country and might not exist in others.

That may very well be true. Before I was offered the job I'm starting in August, the college president was asking me about myself and trying to get to know *me* more than my qualifications (which the committee had all ready vouched for). He flat out told me as much. Apparently, my answers were good enough. :D (I really don't think that they were, but I also was caught completely off guard when he started asking me these questions.)

crosscountry
2007-Jun-20, 07:45 AM
Sperm donor.

make it two.

Fazor
2007-Jun-20, 02:04 PM
The ability to quickly find information on the net is a big help too.

You say tomato, I say...well I still say tomato. But the ability to find stuff quickly on the net, while a big help for me when *I* need information, is quite a burden now that the rest of the office knows I can. Every time they need something it's now my job to find it. That's what I get for ignoring the "give a man a fish/teach a man to fish"

Doodler
2007-Jun-20, 05:01 PM
You say tomato, I say...well I still say tomato. But the ability to find stuff quickly on the net, while a big help for me when *I* need information, is quite a burden now that the rest of the office knows I can. Every time they need something it's now my job to find it. That's what I get for ignoring the "give a man a fish/teach a man to fish"

Been there. Fixing the plotter, converting plot files to PDFs, burning CDs, running permits.

I think half the reason I'm still here is that there's at least half the functions in the office I'm alone in knowing how to do...

Noclevername
2007-Jun-20, 05:29 PM
That's what I get for ignoring the "give a man a fish/teach a man to fish"


Give a man a fish, now you've got no fish. Teach a man to fish, then you can watch him try to catch a fish while you sit there eating.

Doodler
2007-Jun-20, 05:43 PM
Give a man a fish, now you've got no fish. Teach a man to fish, then you can watch him try to catch a fish while you sit there eating.

I always liked "teach a man to fish, and he'll sit around all afternoon in a boat drinking beer".

Moose
2007-Jun-20, 05:44 PM
Build a man a fire, he's warm for a day. Set him on fire, he's warm for the rest of his life.

torque of the town
2007-Jun-21, 10:01 AM
Computer gaming actually helped me along after the fact, because the skills it takes to fix gaming rigs pushed beyond the limit are pretty much the same skills it takes to fix someone's booboo in the office.
The ability to quickly find information on the net is a big help too.



And thats a fact!!

Josh
2007-Jun-21, 11:46 AM
You might not be familiar with the idea of personal hobbies and pastimes being on résumés. The idea is not that any particular personal trait or quirk will help you get the job, but that you're letting the employers get to know you personally, and doing THAT will help you get the job. But it's not very common at all in this country and might not exist in others

Hobbies and Interests is a staple of any resume here in Australia (at least). From what I've been told by people who do the hiring and firing, they actually want to know you aren't going to be some guy whose work is his life. They want well rounded people who are able to not be at work when they aren't at work. (of course, the rest of your resume better show that while you are at work you'll be working hard!)