PDA

View Full Version : Commuting Horror Stories



Paracelsus
2007-Jun-19, 06:00 PM
Do you have a bad commute? Have you recently had the commute from hell?

Here is a thread where you may share your war stories/tales of woe. ;)

I'll kick off by saying that my normal commute is what I'd call a mid-sized commute (for the part of the US where I live): 3-hours round trip, consisting of a 20 min walk to the metro + 1 hour train ride each way. Fortunately, I only have to do this 3 days per week, as I telecommute the other 2 days.

This morning, there were dual catastrophes on the Orange and Green lines (the lines I take to work). There were broken trains blocking the tracks on each line, or so I understand (am unsure about the cause of the Orange line incident). It took me around 2 hours and 15 min to get to work (from the time posted in the Clarendon Metro station to the clock in my office). That total time does not include the usual 20 min walk, as Hubby gave me a ride to the Metro.

Now, in other areas of the US, 2 hours and 15 min would be considered a quick commute! For BAUTers living elsewhere in the US and overseas, what are the commuting conditions where you are? Is a longish commute (~2 hours) commonplace?

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 06:04 PM
25 mins each way - 50 mins total. I consider anything over 30 mins to be excessive.

Fazor
2007-Jun-19, 06:04 PM
My last job had a 45 minute commute if I left my house at 5:30am, but if I left just 15 minutes later it was about an hour and 20 min commute (gotta love traffic). Coming home was always the same time, and was always about an hour and 15 minutes. This was all pure drive time, as I drove from my house to a parking garage 1/2 block from the entrance to my building.

Then I moved to third shift, and it was about a 35 minute drive each way. But I got tired of paying $50 for gas twice a week, and went back to my old (now current) job.

Now my commute is, at longest, 6 minutes. Love it.

Swift
2007-Jun-19, 06:07 PM
25 mins each way - 50 mins total. I consider anything over 30 mins to be excessive.
So do I. My normal commute is 65 minutes each way, but usually once or twice a week (last week it was four times) I have to go to another plant that is 95 minutes each way. I hate it, but I don't have lots of options.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 06:09 PM
So do I. My normal commute is 65 minutes each way, but usually once or twice a week (last week it was four times) I have to go to another plant that is 95 minutes each way. I hate it, but I don't have lots of options.

I understand. I've had longer commutes, although 60 mins was tops.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-19, 06:21 PM
25 mins each way - 50 mins total. I consider anything over 30 mins to be excessive.

I used to think that too, until I moved to this area. I hear of people living out in WVa or DE commuting into DC; their commutes can be up to 2.5 hours one way!

Hubby has a 5 min commute one way. He bought the condo before we were engaged. I figure things work out ok, as he regularly works 60-hour weeks as opposed to my 40-hour weeks. Better for me to have the longer commute than for him to have a longer commute AND a 12-hour workday!

Click Ticker
2007-Jun-19, 06:26 PM
15 - 20 minutes each way. On a really bad day, it might exceed 30 minutes. Longer than 30 minutes can be pretty common around here depending on where one chooses to reside. Not too many hour long commutes though. I live in the Grand Rapids area in West Michigan.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-19, 06:28 PM
I had one job with a 50-min. commute through downtown Hartford. At rush hour. Could've been a half-hour at any other time of day. Fortunately that was only a training position, 6 weeks. The store I ended up working at was 5 minutes from my house.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-19, 06:34 PM
I can't fathom having a 2 1/2 hour commute. Granted, I don't commute at all these days, but that's insane.

When I had a job, it was about a 30- or 45-minute bus ride from home. About a 15- or 20-minute drive, if that long. If I got a job that was more than a 30-minute drive, I'd either move or get a new job. (I had a friend who worked in Seattle, which is an hour one way. He quit because he couldn't afford the gas prices anymore.)

tlbs101
2007-Jun-19, 06:39 PM
It takes me 20 minutes each way, typically (13 miles of in-city freeway) -- 15 minutes if there is no traffic (really early or really late), and 30 minutes (each way) if I hit the worst part of rush hour, or there has been an accident blocking traffic.

It takes 55 minutes to ride my bicycle to work (occasionally) and 1:05 back up the hill at the end of the day.

.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 06:42 PM
My worst commute.

One winter while living in CT and driving into NY state for work, I woke to the sound of snow plows. Spent an hour clearing the driveway so I could get my car out. Took 2 hours to get to work (usually took 1 hr). I was at work for about an hour when we learned that this nor'easter was going to get worse so they sent everyone home. Took 3 hours to get home. Then spent the next 24 hours shoveling the driveway - every 6 hours. But we got the next day off!

And to think that when I was a kid I loved snow.

Fazor
2007-Jun-19, 06:58 PM
And to think that when I was a kid I loved snow.
Isn't it funny how that works? I loved snow too (I think all kids did; what's better than a snow day?). Then you grow up and there's no such thing anymore (well, rarely). My last job was considered "critical government operation" because was incharge of the third-shift security staff in a government building. Was cool having a semi-ranking title like that, but sucked because even if the roads were officially shut down to all travel, I had to get to work ("no officer! I swear I'm not suppose to be out! Please take me to jail!!!" hehe). So there was really no hope of a snow day, no matter how bad it got. All for $11/hour. Sweet..... :rolleyes:

Swift
2007-Jun-19, 07:01 PM
If I got a job that was more than a 30-minute drive, I'd either move or get a new job.
All well and good in theory. But I'm in a very specialized field, so not a lot of decent choices for jobs (sorry, can't afford fast food jobs). At the time we bought our house, I had a 20 minute commute. But various job changes have put me at an hour plus. And various refinancings has given me a 4.75% mortgage - I have trouble walking away from that. So I'm stuck with the current combination until something better happens.


My worst commute.

One winter while living in CT and driving into NY state for work, I woke to the sound of snow plows. Spent an hour clearing the driveway so I could get my car out. Took 2 hours to get to work (usually took 1 hr). I was at work for about an hour when we learned that this nor'easter was going to get worse so they sent everyone home. Took 3 hours to get home. Then spent the next 24 hours shoveling the driveway - every 6 hours. But we got the next day off!

And to think that when I was a kid I loved snow.
Man, have I had those days in Ohio. I think the worst was about 3 hours coming home when my commute was normally 45 minutes.
But, as long as I don't have to drive, I still love snow.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-19, 07:03 PM
So I'm stuck with the current combination until something better happens.

I think most people are in a similar position. You take what you can get, but sometimes it takes you.

("In Soviet Russia, life takes you!")

Noclevername
2007-Jun-19, 07:04 PM
D'oh!

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-19, 07:12 PM
74 miles round trip, 40 minutes each way, and that includes a 5-minute stop for Java. That is if I leave at my normal time (5:30). Leaving much after that starts adding to the time. The best part o that is being home at 3:30 or 4:00.

My nemesis is snow. After a couple times of driving 2 hours each way (or more!) to work for 5 or 6 hours; we now have an understanding that if the snow is going to gum up the drive, I stay home and do what I can over the telephone. That is one of the wonderful things about having highly flexible flex-time, the option to telecommute, and lots of PTO on the books.

weatherc
2007-Jun-19, 07:43 PM
I live in New Jersey. Don't even get me started on how badly my commute can suck. And no, I can't move closer to where the work is because that's also where the houses are really expensive, so I'm just stuck. I would prefer to take a train or a bus to work, but there is no train station near my office, and a bus would require a number of transfers and over two hours each way.

My commute is 22 miles each way. It takes 20-25 minutes on a weekend. It takes 45-55 minutes on a normal weekday. Due to accidents on critical roads in my area, my commute took an hour and thirty-five minutes today. It took an hour and fifteen minutes yesterday.

I just wish people in this state could learn to drive without hitting each other all the time. In my opinion, if you cause an accident during rush hour, your license should be permanently revoked.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-19, 07:54 PM
D'oh!

First Pete, then re-Pete. :):)

Noclevername
2007-Jun-19, 08:00 PM
First Pete, then re-Pete. :):)


Life took me.

Swift
2007-Jun-19, 09:16 PM
I just wish people in this state could learn to drive without hitting each other all the time. In my opinion, if you cause an accident during rush hour, your license should be permanently revoked.
I'm sure the Black Knight would have an even better option. :razz:

weatherc
2007-Jun-19, 09:18 PM
I'm sure the Black Knight would have an even better option. :razz:There are days I wish I could do that. It's a good thing I don't keep a sword in the car with me.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-19, 09:41 PM
74 miles round trip, 40 minutes each way, and that includes a 5-minute stop for Java.

Oof! That is a LOT of driving. I don't like to drive. I'm not very good at it, and it makes my knee hurt.


And no, I can't move closer to where the work is because that's also where the houses are really expensive, so I'm just stuck.

My husband and I are in the same boat. A house in DC would be almost impossible for us to afford, unless we wanted to live in Anacostia or Ft. Totten. If we move to MD to ease my commute, his commute would turn into a nightmare. He has the longer workday.

ToSeek
2007-Jun-19, 09:47 PM
If it takes 15 minutes for me to get door-to-door, then that's a really messed-up commute for me. (On the other hand, for a while there, I was working in downtown DC, and my initial drive - about the same time as it is now - just got me to the train station, and I had another 30 minutes on the train to get to the office.)

Lord Jubjub
2007-Jun-19, 09:53 PM
I have a sixteen mile commute one way. The highway used to have very few lights and I could routinely do the distance in 25-30 minutes even at rush hour.

Now that the area has built up and a dozen stop lights added, I can leave at 6:20 to catch the early part of rush hour and it still takes me 30-35 minutes as long as I hit most of the greens.

On the way home, if I have to leave late (say 4:30-5:00), it can take me an hour.

Doodler
2007-Jun-19, 09:59 PM
My worst commute was walking from the bus stop to the restaurant I worked for in the ice storm in January 1995. A half mile of pure black ice.

Slightly behind that is the 45 minute walk from my apartment to the restaurant in the summer when it hit 115 in Laurel for three weeks.


These days, my commute is only hellish if it takes more than ten minutes to go all of the five miles from my office to the townhouse.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-19, 10:05 PM
Working in downtown DC would be paradise on a stick for me, as I'm right on the Orange line.

My office used to be at Vermont & L; my commute would have been a straight shot west on the Orange line to McPherson Sq...45 min. max.

Those were the days...

Doodler
2007-Jun-19, 10:18 PM
It'd be a little expensive, but I think the MARC system has a monthly pass, and I'm only a few miles from the station in Laurel. Catch it heading to Union station, then to wherever.

Jim
2007-Jun-19, 10:27 PM
My worst commute.

One winter while living in CT and driving into NY state for work, I woke to the sound of snow plows. ...

When I was attending college, we lived in south Austin, across the Colorado River from the main campus. My commute to the campus was 15-20 minutes, tops, straight up I35.

One morning, I awoke to find snow on the ground and more coming down. I checked the radio; no snow day for the college crowd. So, I left a early.

Good thing, because it took over twice as long to get to campus. But, I made my 8:00am class.

At 11:00, with my classes behind me, I left campus and started the drive home... slowly, cautiously... over the snow covered freeway.

As I was crossing the river, the radio announced that, due to the snow and resulting road conditions, all classes were cancelled. It was just too dangerous to travel.

captain swoop
2007-Jun-19, 10:31 PM
I used to commute from Eltham to Charring Cross every day. and before that I went rfom Norht Woolwich Via the North London line to Upper Street islington.

I can confidently say that not one of you can have had a worse commkute then me!

sarongsong
2007-Jun-19, 11:20 PM
Don't forget to look up; this one happened yesterday evening about a mile from my house (missed the whole thing):
June 19, 2007
A Carlsbad pilot testing a rebuilt engine in a single-engine Cessna crashed on westbound Highway 78 Monday evening..."All of a sudden the engine blew up...I came in and plowed right into her"...
[View A Slide Show]
North County Times (http://nctimes.com/articles/2007/06/19/news/top_stories/1_00_176_18_07.txt)

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-20, 12:08 AM
As I was crossing the river, the radio announced that, due to the snow and resulting road conditions, all classes were cancelled. It was just too dangerous to travel.


It's the same over here in Tucson - a little ice or snow and we have 300 accidents, school closings - it's pathetic. :rolleyes:

SeanF
2007-Jun-20, 01:14 AM
It takes me 20 minutes each way, typically (13 miles of in-city freeway)...
Same here, but mine's about a fifteen-mile drive (of which fourteen miles is freeway), so it's a couple minutes longer.

Actually, I usually go to the gym in the morning and to work directly from there, and the gym is in the opposite direction of work. :doh: So my morning commute is quite a bit longer, but it's broken up.


I just wish people in this state could learn to drive without hitting each other all the time.
Okay, here's my change to gloat. :) According to Allstate, my hometown has the safest drivers in the country (http://media.allstate.com/categories/6/releases/4293), for the second year in a row.

Yeah, us! :)

Jim
2007-Jun-20, 01:24 AM
It's the same over here in Tucson - a little ice or snow and we have 300 accidents, school closings - it's pathetic. :rolleyes:

No, that's Houston. There was 4" on the ground when I left home, more when I started back.

ToSeek
2007-Jun-20, 01:24 AM
Working in downtown DC would be paradise on a stick for me, as I'm right on the Orange line.

My office used to be at Vermont & L; my commute would have been a straight shot west on the Orange line to McPherson Sq...45 min. max.

Those were the days...

When I was downtown, I could literally walk from Metro Center to my office without going outside, which was pretty cool. But in good weather I'd frequently get off a few stops early in order to take a bit of a walk before sitting at my cubicle for the rest of the day.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-20, 01:43 AM
All well and good in theory. But I'm in a very specialized field, so not a lot of decent choices for jobs (sorry, can't afford fast food jobs). At the time we bought our house, I had a 20 minute commute. But various job changes have put me at an hour plus. And various refinancings has given me a 4.75% mortgage - I have trouble walking away from that. So I'm stuck with the current combination until something better happens.

Doom. Fortunately, I wouldn't be even if I did have the degrees necessary for my chosen field; I could work at any community college, though working at my alma mater would be my first choice (I'd have to get published and have a PhD to have a shot). Then again, I still live in an apartment. With luck, by the time Graham's saved enough to buy a house, I'll be published and selling well enough so that I still don't need to work.

Trebuchet
2007-Jun-20, 02:49 AM
About 15 minutes each way for me, plus a five minute walk in from the parking lot. I start work at 6:30 A.M. or the parking lot would be a LOT longer. Some walk up to a mile and half just to get from their cars to the office. I've turned down jobs at other facilities that would have been good career moves because I just didn't like the idea of commuting.

I had a commute of at least an hour each way years ago. I quit a job I liked and took a pay cut to get out of it. As someone mentioned above, the starting time made a difference. When I had to start at 8:00, I had to leave home by 6:45. But when I was allowed to move it to 7:30, I only had to leave at 6:30. Friday morning was always the best drive of the week. Friday evening was usually the worst, up to 3-4 hours to go 30 miles.

Jens
2007-Jun-20, 06:38 AM
I have a 50 minute commute each way, including 4-minute walks from the stations on both ends. It's actually pretty comfortable, despite stories people might hear about Tokyo. I take a local train, and can sit pretty much all the way, so it gives me (precious) time to read.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-20, 10:17 AM
I had one job with a 50-min. commute through downtown Hartford. At rush hour. Could've been a half-hour at any other time of day. Fortunately that was only a training position, 6 weeks. The store I ended up working at was 5 minutes from my house.That's Hartford, CT, right?

I used to live in Granby and accepted a position with a company in Uncasville. 150 miles every day. Plus hitting the best of Hartford in the Meadows on I-91 every morning and evening.

Fortunately I soon joined a car pool of other idiots who lived so far away from the company. I will soon fill this thread with the unbelievable but true stories about the adventures of car pooling.

Here's a teaser: one of the car pool members had a slight case of narcolepsy. When it was his turn to drive, he was OK in the morning but during the drive back with the sun beaming in from the west, old Ralph would soon start to nod off. Whoever rode shotgun had the assignment of having his left hand ready to grab the wheel when Ralph's car started veering off the road or into another lane of CT 2.

For some strange reason I soon got rid of the house in Granby and bought one in Niantic, 13 miles from work.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-20, 12:46 PM
I guess everybody has a different threshold. I consider my 40 minutes each way as very tolerable, especially since it gets me from the hustle and bustle of work in the city to a pretty darn remote country location. To do that in some of the bigger metro areas people have mentioned would either take a couple hours each way, or cost way way more than I could afford.

If think if I was faced with more than an hour each way to get to a rural setting, I'd change employer or residence or both.

Swift
2007-Jun-20, 01:08 PM
I guess everybody has a different threshold. I consider my 40 minutes each way as very tolerable, especially since it gets me from the hustle and bustle of work in the city to a pretty darn remote country location. To do that in some of the bigger metro areas people have mentioned would either take a couple hours each way, or cost way way more than I could afford.

If think if I was faced with more than an hour each way to get to a rural setting, I'd change employer or residence or both.
It is funny. 40 or 45 minutes doesn't seem that bad to me. And though I have about an hour, that puts me in what is technically a suburb, though my backyard is a 700 acre state nature preserve, so it is pretty rural looking. Though Cleveland is terrible for mass transit, you can be from downtown to farmland in well under an hour with a car.

Doodler
2007-Jun-20, 01:45 PM
When I was working construction, the commute to the shop usually wasn't bad in terms of driving. It was driving from the shop to the jobsite where things got REAL ugly.

In order to be started at the site by 7am, I was getting to work at 4:30-5:00am.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-20, 02:33 PM
I used to commute from Eltham to Charring Cross every day. and before that I went rfom Norht Woolwich Via the North London line to Upper Street islington.

I can confidently say that not one of you can have had a worse commkute then me!

Am not familiar with that area. Was it the length of time, or did you face a lot of traffic...?

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-20, 02:37 PM
I used to live in Granby and accepted a position with a company in Uncasville.

Is that next to Chingachgookville?

Jim
2007-Jun-20, 03:05 PM
... mass transit ...

I live in Houston. I am not familiar with this term.



Okay, in the interests of honesty, Houston is trying to get effective mass transit (beyond the mass of cars trying to transit from Point A to Point B). We do have some Park and Ride routes; and some carpool locations. We even have an electric train... that cannot run when it rains too much because the power cables are in the street... where it floods.

But, we're planning more! We just have to work out the routes. Folks want the routes close enough so they can easily catch the train, but not so close that they can actually see them.

Houstonians seem to like their cars too much to get behind - or onboard - mass transit. The freeways we have are great; most folks think they'd be the answer if (1) TXDOT would quit working on the freeways*, and (2) other people would stop using the freeways.



* Our freeways seem always to be "under construction." A local radio show had a call in trivia question in the 1970s: When did construction work on the Gulf Freeway (begun in 1948) end? The first caller accused them of using a trick question because construction on the Gulf Freeway has never stopped.

Still hasn't.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-20, 03:07 PM
I live in Houston. I am not familiar with this term.


Same here in Tucson. A crappy bus system is all we have.

John Mendenhall
2007-Jun-20, 03:08 PM
Tucson, since continental drift is unstoppable, you might be interested in my business partner Donna's Comprehensive Continental Drift Collision Insurance Policy. I think Donna's the only one selling it. So far no takers.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-20, 03:11 PM
Tucson, since continental drift is unstoppable, you might be interested in my business partner Donna's Comprehensive Continental Drift Collision Insurance Policy. I think Donna's the only one selling it. So far no takers.

OT . . .

"Stop Continental Drift!"

It's a joke that a famous Geologist (don't remember his name) had on a plaque on his desk and it had to do with the backlash against Tectonic Plate Theory in the late 60s - an exciting time for Geologists - it even overshadowed the Moon landings - for Geologists, that is.

John Mendenhall
2007-Jun-20, 03:11 PM
* Our freeways seem always to be "under construction." A local radio show had a call in trivia question in the 1970s: When did construction work on the Gulf Freeway (begun in 1948) end? The first caller accused them of using a trick question because construction on the Gulf Freeway has never stopped.

Still hasn't.

We live a little further north. Our freeway (I95) has two seasons, winter and under construction.

Doodler
2007-Jun-20, 03:36 PM
We live a little further north. Our freeway (I95) has two seasons, winter and under construction.

DC's beltway is the same. I'm personally of the opinion that they have two crews of asphalt pavers that just orbit the capitol at the rate of a half mile every three days...

captain swoop
2007-Jun-20, 03:53 PM
Am not familiar with that area. Was it the length of time, or did you face a lot of traffic...?

I had to face the joke of network South-east and the London Underground.

the journey could take anything from 40 minutes to two hours to get there and the same to get home. It was a 25% chance that the train was cancelled in the morning and the same going home. An added interest was the occasional fault that closed the lines to Charring Cross so we had to make our way to London Bridge and fight for a place there.

Sometimes we just went to the pub after work and didn't bother going for a train till about 7 PM. We could get home no more than half an hour later than the 'proper' time.

MrClean
2007-Jun-20, 03:59 PM
That's the way in KC. There is a cycle of once every 6 or 7 years where the construction on I-35 isn't in the area that I drive. Then times are sweet. It's a 22 mile drive for me from the Beautiful, Wonderful God's country of Parkville, Mo. to the not totally stinky because it's next to and not in Overland Park (say 500 feet away) Lenexa, KS. If I drive the posted 60 and 65 mph we make it in about 25 minutes from push out and door down to kicker stand down in the parking lot.

Unfortunately at those speeds you spend more time looking in your rear view mirrors trying to gauge which way to dodge. I get my 500 mile checkup on my bike tomorrow so that I can drive 80 with the rest of the morons on the highway. Speed doesn't kill, differential speed does. Slow as it is, I've had to pass folks to keep others from running into me. At 80 I won't be at the head of the crowd, but those people doing 90-100 are far and few inbetween. A little un-nerving on the motorcycle. But it keeps you alert and aware.

Up in God's country it's 55 mph and folks rarely do 60. It's just so purty up there.

Frantic Freddie
2007-Jun-20, 04:52 PM
I live outside of Albuquerque & fortunately both my wife & I work in the area,so we don't have to make the daily drive through Tijeras Canyon.Those of you who know the area know what I'm talkin' about,speeding truckers,tailgaiting idiots,the jackass that just has to pass,then gets in front of you & slows way down & of course,the winter weather,with the Hiway Dept's random decisions to open or close the Canyon.

But one evening,as I was coming up 66 to avoid an accident on I-40 I saw a car actually swerve to hit a dog.The poor thing rolled onto the shoulder & I stopped to see if it was OK.It wasn't,it's back half was crushed & twisted,but it was still alive.I checked for a collar,there was none,but it didn't look like a stray.
I couldn't let it suffer,so I got my gun & put it out of it's misery.

There was absolutely no reason for the driver to run over that dog.

I came home,petted my dogs & had a few stiff drinks.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-20, 04:54 PM
But one evening,as I was coming up 66 to avoid an accident on I-40 I saw a car actually swerve to hit a dog.The poor thing rolled onto the shoulder & I stopped to see if it was OK.It wasn't,it's back half was crushed & twisted,but it was still alive.I checked for a collar,there was none,but it didn't look like a stray.
I couldn't let it suffer,so I got my gun & put it out of it's misery.

There was absolutely no reason for the driver to run over that dog.

I came home,petted my dogs & had a few stiff drinks.

I really don't like people sometimes. :mad:

EDIT: After re-reading this I want to be clear that I wasn't referring to you Freddie.

Swift
2007-Jun-20, 05:37 PM
We even have an electric train... that cannot run when it rains too much because the power cables are in the street... where it floods.

Good thing it doesn't rain much in Houston. :shifty:

:lol:

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-20, 10:35 PM
I had to face the joke of network South-east and the London Underground.

the journey could take anything from 40 minutes to two hours to get there and the same to get home. It was a 25% chance that the train was cancelled in the morning and the same going home. An added interest was the occasional fault that closed the lines to Charring Cross so we had to make our way to London Bridge and fight for a place there.

Sometimes we just went to the pub after work and didn't bother going for a train till about 7 PM. We could get home no more than half an hour later than the 'proper' time.

Ugh...yeah, that is definitely worse than mine. The unpredictability of the whole deal would have been the worst part of it, as far as I'm concerned.

Jens, I have heard good things about Japan's rail systems. DC's public transportation system was very good a couple of years back, until the economic boom and subsequent influx of people completely overwhelmed it.:(

captain swoop
2007-Jun-20, 11:33 PM
At the moment i am contracting for the company that does dell field support so my whole day is one big commute :)

Jens
2007-Jun-21, 02:22 AM
Jens, I have heard good things about Japan's rail systems. DC's public transportation system was very good a couple of years back, until the economic boom and subsequent influx of people completely overwhelmed it.:(

Well, trains in Japan are great in some ways. They can be really crowded during rush hour, but are OK if you can avoid it. And at my station (not an express station), they come every six or seven minutes, so you never have to wait too long. The problem is the cost, though. If I were to take the train from my home to downtown Tokyo, it would cost 400 yen (like 3.5 US dollars).

Gillianren
2007-Jun-21, 02:25 AM
I lived about eight blocks from where the bus line back home ran out. I had more than a few friends who lived in areas without buses, and transit in LA's not bad. Not like Port Angeles, WA, where the buses don't run at all on Sundays.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-21, 07:26 AM
I live in Houston. I am not familiar with this term.



Okay, in the interests of honesty, Houston is trying to get effective mass transit (beyond the mass of cars trying to transit from Point A to Point B). We do have some Park and Ride routes; and some carpool locations. We even have an electric train... that cannot run when it rains too much because the power cables are in the street... where it floods.

But, we're planning more! We just have to work out the routes. Folks want the routes close enough so they can easily catch the train, but not so close that they can actually see them.

Houstonians seem to like their cars too much to get behind - or onboard - mass transit. The freeways we have are great; most folks think they'd be the answer if (1) TXDOT would quit working on the freeways*, and (2) other people would stop using the freeways.



* Our freeways seem always to be "under construction." A local radio show had a call in trivia question in the 1970s: When did construction work on the Gulf Freeway (begun in 1948) end? The first caller accused them of using a trick question because construction on the Gulf Freeway has never stopped.

Still hasn't.

My mom and dad lived in Houston before I was born. One day, Mom (who can't navigate to save her life, got on this part of the freeway in Houston which is similar to the Washington beltway (610??) during rush hour. I forget where she was trying to go, but she couldn't figure out which exit to take to get where she was going. She wound up going around and around 610 for hours! I think she made at least 3 or 4 complete circuits of 610 before she finally exited.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-21, 07:30 AM
Is that next to Chingachgookville?No, Chingachgookville is next to Cooperstown.

We're talking Uncas here, a Mohegan. The town is now the home of the Mohegan Sun resort, sort of the overflow receiver for Foxwoods.

Whirlpool
2007-Jun-22, 01:10 AM
Here in my country, I have the worst and well.. we have the worst traffic and commuting is a nightmare!

From my house to my work , if I commute, first riding a jeepney from house to downtown , that is 30-45 mins, in the first hour of the morning , I have to get up very early so that I can leave house before sunshine so that traffic is still light, and then reaching downtown, I would ride a bus, and this is the nightmare , it is a 1 1/2 - 2 hr travel :neutral: considering all the obstacles before I reached my office. So its almost 3hrs commute :doh: You can just imagine what time I woke up before when I don't have a car yet, if my works starts at 8AM. :neutral:

Comparing to having my own means of transportation now, I leave my house at 530AM and I arrive in my office 7AM , that's a only 1 1/2 travel time. :D

That's a relief.