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View Full Version : Board Of Inquiry Blames ADF For Sea King Crash



Damien Evans
2007-Jun-21, 07:35 AM
Read More (http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=66207)

Heads will roll over this one.

Why is it always those pesky 5 cent parts that cause all the problems?

Ronald Brak
2007-Jun-21, 08:41 AM
From the article:


Air Chief Marshal Houston defended his forces' safety record, saying that despite a "high operational tempo" there had been no fatal accidents in the six years prior to the Sea King crash, a record unmatched by any defence force of equal or greater size.

What does this mean? Isn't this just saying, "Countries with more helicopters crashed more than us." Surely we should look at hours flown in helicopters rather than defence force size?


"The loss of nine lives continues to be deeply felt by all members of the Australian Defence Force."

I wonder if steps will be taken to prevent members of the armed forces from feeling the loss of lives so deeply? But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-21, 10:05 AM
I wonder if steps will be taken to prevent members of the armed forces from feeling the loss of lives so deeply? But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply.

you've got to remember, we have had almost no deaths since 'nam, so they're going to feel it differently than they would if it happened more often

but i also like the idea

korjik
2007-Jun-21, 03:53 PM
From the article:



What does this mean? Isn't this just saying, "Countries with more helicopters crashed more than us." Surely we should look at hours flown in helicopters rather than defence force size?



I wonder if steps will be taken to prevent members of the armed forces from feeling the loss of lives so deeply? But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply.

Do you think that military are mindless killbots? They are people just like any other and they feel the loss of friends just like any other. Your implication that soldiers arent just like any other person is really quite insulting.

Nicolas
2007-Jun-21, 04:37 PM
I heard that the company creating the specific spare parts for the Sea King has stopped its production lines, which is one of the reasons nations using them are looking for a replacement all at once :). Belgium (8+2) and the Netherlands (20) will, just like Australia, go for the NH-90.

The Belgian Sea Kings always were a great show on air shows (other countries probably as well, but I didn't see those flying :)). They sometimes flew with all 5 together, and had practiced some tricks such as the "inverse airlifting" (you need to see it to appreciate the effect).

If there's one thing we learned through aviation history, it's that maintenance shortcuts tend to result in disaster eventually.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jun-22, 02:44 AM
Do you think that military are mindless killbots?

No.


They are people just like any other and they feel the loss of friends just like any other.

Okay.


Your implication that soldiers arent just like any other person is really quite insulting.

What implication?

Please reread my post. I hypothesize that something about my writing has caused you to pigeon-hole me in a particular mental category and you are ascribing characteristics to me from that category and ignoring what I actually wrote.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-22, 06:56 AM
Do you think that military are mindless killbots? They are people just like any other and they feel the loss of friends just like any other. Your implication that soldiers arent just like any other person is really quite insulting.

What:confused:

I see no such implication

Jens
2007-Jun-22, 08:14 AM
But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply.

I think Korjik interpreted this as an implication that armed forces do not feel the loss of lives deeply. The suspicion being that the implication of your question was, "why do they feel the loss of their own comrades' lives deeply, but don't mourn the enemy?" It would seem a reasonable guess to me, though you may have been saying something different.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jun-22, 09:38 AM
I think Korjik interpreted this as an implication that armed forces do not feel the loss of lives deeply. The suspicion being that the implication of your question was, "why do they feel the loss of their own comrades' lives deeply, but don't mourn the enemy?" It would seem a reasonable guess to me, though you may have been saying something different.

Okay. Well, just to clear things up, when I wrote, "But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply." I meant that I liked the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply. To expand further, I like the idea of armed forces that don't squander lives needlessly. I understand that not everyone may agree with me on this point, however I don't really understand why. And when I wrote, "I wonder if steps will be taken to prevent members of the armed forces from feeling the loss of lives so deeply?" there is actually a double meaning. The first meaning is, "I wonder if steps will be taken to prevent members of the armed forces from feeling the loss of lives so deeply?" That is, will steps be taken to reduce emotional impact of future deaths? The second meaning is hidden and intended for speakers of Australian English. Interestingly the original article now appears to have changed.

korjik
2007-Jun-22, 03:13 PM
Jens got exactly what I was thinking. You said:



But I do like the idea of armed forces that feel the loss of lives deeply.


My question is: Why would you think that soldiers are any different than anyone else?

Your statements do indicate that you think there is a difference between what soldiers think and what civilians think. Then you point out that you like that soldiers can 'feel the loss of lives deeply.' This implies that you didnt think that they could.

I may be reading more into your statement that is really there Ronald, but it seems to be a fairly common attitude amongst certain elements here in the US.