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NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-21, 05:31 PM
I was hoping not to comment on this... but being immersed by the local media, it was inevitable.
It's amazing how a possibly tragic situation is turned into a freak show by the media.
Including the 2500 (http://www.newsnet5.com/news/13534898/detail.html) ... er 1500 (http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=70012) ... er 1000 (http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-06-21-missing-woman_N.htm)... er hundreds (http://www.cnn.com/) of people searching, they are bringing in a drone.

What advantage does a drone have over somebody in a helicopter? I thought the big advantage of a drone is not to put someone in a dangerous situation.

And since yesterday I keep hearing about using sonar, but nobody says for what? Is there something other than a water search that sonar can be used for? how?

Now; theres a lot more strange things that I can comment on, but I hope to limit this to a more technical question oriented thread than one of speculation and intrigue.

You know its bad, when they make a big thing about interrupting coverage because they have to refuel thier helicopter.

tofu
2007-Jun-21, 06:09 PM
What advantage does a drone have over somebody in a helicopter?

cost of fuel? Also, a nice steady camera - unless they were going to get a special helicopter with a camera.



You know its bad, when they make a big thing about interrupting coverage because they have to refuel thier helicopter.

In my personal opinion, the age of the 24-hour news networks is over. CNN and Headline news were great ten to fifteen years ago, but today the web works so much better. If nothing is happening, then you don't feel the need to update the webpage. If I really need to know the moment something happens, I can subscribe to your RSS feed. TV just doesn't work. It's so expensive that they have to keep you glued to it in order to make any money, so they have to exaggerate everything, sensationalize everything, fill every second of dead air.

I was watching a police chase on live TV once. The police took out the car's tires so the thief ran until the rubber was gone and wheels caught fire. After the police caught the guy, a fire truck pulled up. The news announcer has been talking nonstop this whole time of course, for fear that I'll turn the channel if I don't have the crutch of his unique insight. When the fire truck drives up he says, "the fire department is here. They will put out the fire." Wow.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-21, 06:12 PM
In my personal opinion, the age of the 24-hour news networks is over.

Hooray! WE'RE FREE! :dance::clap::dance:

ADDED: Nope, I checked the TV. False alarm. :(

Doodler
2007-Jun-21, 06:17 PM
Hooray! WE'RE FREE! :dance::clap::dance:

ADDED: Nope, I checked the TV. False alarm. :(

They're still on 24/7, but its endless regurgitation of about two hours worth of news.

As for this months Deadmate of the Month, she fits the profile.

Cute, white, knocked up (always a bonus play on the heartstrings).

There's a parallel story of an African American woman who has been missing for about a week, nothing like this level of coverage.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-21, 06:32 PM
They're still on 24/7, but its endless regurgitation of about two hours worth of news.


And don't forget the guest "experts". :rolleyes:

Noclevername
2007-Jun-21, 06:40 PM
And don't forget the guest "experts". :rolleyes:

An expert on missing girls, I don't wanna hear from.

Mostly they just fill the airwaves with the mindless blatherings of talking-head pundits. Bah. I can get more meaningful babblings from a brook.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-21, 06:43 PM
Again, I think there could be some really good use of a 24-hour news network. If they were willing to cover a wider range of news, such as that which happens outside the United States, oh, what a concept. I like seeing people interviewed, especially if they're actually the people making the news. Heck, there are certain experts I like--I'll stop what I'm doing if they're interviewing Vince Bugliosi.

But as it stands, they don't have enough reporters to fill the gap. Too many anchors, mind, but not enough people actually going out to cover news.

Swift
2007-Jun-21, 09:10 PM
Again, I think there could be some really good use of a 24-hour news network. If they were willing to cover a wider range of news, such as that which happens outside the United States, oh, what a concept. I like seeing people interviewed, especially if they're actually the people making the news. Heck, there are certain experts I like--I'll stop what I'm doing if they're interviewing Vince Bugliosi.

But as it stands, they don't have enough reporters to fill the gap. Too many anchors, mind, but not enough people actually going out to cover news.
Absolutely. Cover the rest of the world and maybe spend more than 15 or 20 seconds on some stories. TV news' definition of "in-depth analysis" seems to be to spend 25 seconds on it.

It is amazing that somehow NPR manages to fill the time with continous news, yet doesn't repeat the same mindless nonsense every 15 minutes. Must be the difference between radio and TV. :rolleyes:

Noclevername
2007-Jun-21, 09:13 PM
But as it stands, they don't have enough reporters to fill the gap. Too many anchors, mind, but not enough people actually going out to cover news.

Except on the Weather Channel, where they send reporters outdoors every time there's a storm. It's like, "Hey, we can't just tell you there's a hurricane, we have to show you somebody getting blown around while talking about it, too!"

Moose
2007-Jun-21, 09:18 PM
I'd love to see a news channel that operated over a full hour (or two, preferably) of international news, with the ticker at the bottom giving the headlines that are being covered, and the times, on a continually rotating basis over ten minutes or so.

Donnie B.
2007-Jun-21, 09:26 PM
Except on the Weather Channel, where they send reporters outdoors every time there's a storm. It's like, "Hey, we can't just tell you there's a hurricane, we have to show you somebody getting blown around while talking about it, too!"Yeah, that's so ridiculous. I'm waiting for the day they decide to send the reporter out into the tornado.

"...That's right, Sal, it's really wind

Moose
2007-Jun-21, 09:26 PM
Except on the Weather Channel, where they send reporters outdoors every time there's a storm. It's like, "Hey, we can't just tell you there's a hurricane, we have to show you somebody getting blown around while talking about it, too!"

Yeah, but that's just fun. (http://www.kontraband.com/show/show.asp?ID=2403&rtn=search-2403&Keywords=hurricane)

(Linked page is SFW, but there is NSFW content (well marked behind "I agree" pages) to be found as well.)

Swift
2007-Jun-21, 09:34 PM
Except on the Weather Channel, where they send reporters outdoors every time there's a storm. It's like, "Hey, we can't just tell you there's a hurricane, we have to show you somebody getting blown around while talking about it, too!"
Maybe they should do that for all coverage.

If you are covering the latest Hollywood gossip, maybe an underage star out drinking, you are actually in the bar sitting next to them while they have that drink.

A sports reporter covering the game isn't on the sidelines or up in the press box, but is actually standing in the middle of the field during play, or standing in the middle of the NASCAR track with the cars speeding by.

Reporter covering a fire has to be in the middle of the burning building. If you are covering the shuttle landing, you stand in the middle of the runway, right where it touches down.

It would certainly open up a lot more jobs for the journalism majors. :D