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OneHotJupiter
2007-Jun-26, 01:36 AM
I finished Gene Cernans book , Last man on the Moon.

I cannot rave about it enough , not only does it give the most detailed description of what it was like to be one of the first great space heroes , but he does it as if he was talking to an old friend , he isn't afraid to pepper the story with some colorful language and pretty funny antecdotes , from the Astronaut selection process to Gemini and his "Spacewalk from Hell" to his back up duties and his close call with Apollo 10 to his triumphant three day stay at Taurus/littrow and the final lunar voyage , I like how it's from the perspective of a hard working astronaut working his way up , unlike Deke Slaytons book , which was almost from Gods perspective as far as flight crews go.

He discusses in Detail his fight with the "Angry Alligator" and gives his views on his fellow Astronauts in a way that only Gene Cernan could , I beg any student of Apollo to read this book , you will be very glad you did
I never wanted it to end and Commander Cernan dosen't give you a dull moment in Last man on the Moon! Two thumbs up!

Palomar
2007-Jun-26, 12:23 PM
I'll echo what Cernan said: He hopes he wasn't the last man on the Moon.

Best to say "last man on the Moon...for now." ;)

I'll consider giving it a read. Have read James Lovell's "Lost Moon" (and yes, I've seen -- happily more than once -- the Ron Howard film Apollo 13).

Apollo was beyond fantastic. I turned 4 in 1969, and do remember -- albeit in tiny fragments -- Apollo 11. I also have a couple of clear memories of Apollo 13; my father tried explaining to me why the astronauts "were in trouble and might never come home." That's the first time I recall being truly frightened for someone else...

OneHotJupiter
2007-Jun-26, 01:36 PM
Great!

I'd love to read Commander Lovell's book.

I've been on a non-stop Apollo trip for about five or six books and there is no sign of letting up , I've moved on to Anderw Chaikens rather thick book of the Apollo Voyages , I've Gene Krantz's book "Failure is not an option" , to me NOTHING is as fascinating as man's voyage to the moon and by the time I'm done , I'll be practically an expert on the subject , if anybody knows of a great Apollo book , please feel free to let me know!

Moose
2007-Jun-26, 05:47 PM
Dave Scott / Alexei Leonov's book was pretty good. Not the best I've seen, but the glimpse into the soviet program especially was worthwhile, and there's info on the Apollo-Soyuz and Skylab missions which really weren't covered in depth anywhere else.

Someone had recommended a book (whose title escapes me at the moment, I'll get details of both books to you when I get home) that interviews all the surviving Apollo moonwalkers. He gets sidetracked into irrelevancy more than I'm happy with, but he does genuinely attempt to answer "what was it like" by looking at the astronauts' post-Apollo lives. It was a clever approach to that question.

Thing is, I can understand why that question frustrates the astronauts so. It's not really something one can describe using mere words. And as test pilots and engineers, they're far more interested in the technical and achievement aspects of the missions.

I'd argue, however, that without attempting to communicate the personal experience so that those of us "grounded" folks can understand what it means to have gone there, the technical and achievement angles really don't matter.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-26, 07:26 PM
I picked up the book currently known as Apollo 13 at Goodwill this weekend.

Palomar
2007-Jun-26, 08:06 PM
Great!

I'd love to read Commander Lovell's book.

I'm sure you will enjoy it.

James Lovell is my favorite Apollo astronaut; I call him "James Lovellable." :o


I've been on a non-stop Apollo trip for about five or six books and there is no sign of letting up

It was quite an era, what I recall of it; fond memories. During Apollo 11 my mother yelled at me from the kitchen to quit jumping in the living room; I was trying to imitate the astronauts' "slow motion" bobbing around. :) Definitely made a huge impression on me -- especially those gorgeous Saturn V's, which I call "The Royalty of Rockets," have 2 posters of in this (home) office and a DVD of every Saturn V launch; also another DVD collection dealing with the development of the Saturn series (from the late 1950's on).

Marketing was SO Space Age/Race oriented: From names of cars to restaurants to menu items, etc. Loved riding in my aunt and uncle's blue and white "Galaxy 500." Can still see glimpses of that era in (not surprisingly) Alamogordo, NM.


, I've moved on to Anderw Chaikens rather thick book of the Apollo Voyages , I've Gene Krantz's book "Failure is not an option"

I considered reading Krantz's book a few years ago. Might still do that.

Long live Apollo, and congratulatory cigars in mission control!

Moose
2007-Jun-27, 12:28 AM
Right. Here they are.

Two Sides of the Moon (http://www.amazon.com/Two-Sides-Moon-Story-Space/dp/0312308663/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7276782-1332034?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182904052&sr=8-1) by Dave Scott and Alexei Leonov.

Moon Dust: In Search of the Men Who Fell to Earth (http://www.amazon.com/Moondust-Search-Men-Fell-Earth/dp/B000GG4LV2/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-7276782-1332034?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182904084&sr=1-1) by Andrew Smith.

Just noticed that my copy of Deke! isn't where it's supposed to be. Must locate it.

OneHotJupiter
2007-Jun-27, 01:38 AM
I've read Andrew Smith's :Men Who Fell To Earth Book , it was was a good read , It was interesting to see a European perspective on the program , I found it quite hilarious that , the man even found room to include an interview with a man who , I'm sure needs no introduction on this forum , one Mr. Fart Sibrel , the author goes so far as to call the Notorious "astronauts gone wild " creator his friend , I was upset by that inclusion to the work , but found the rest of the book to be more of a gateway to to more interesting works.

I am also starting to enjoy Commander Lovell more myself , though my leanings are toward Gene Cernam or Dave Scott as my fave's , but then again they are all fascinating people and with every sentence of every book , I enjoy each of them More for what they were and What they accomplished!

Thanks for the responses , I intend to look up every one of those books!

Keep 'em comin'!

AGN Fuel
2007-Jun-27, 03:05 AM
Most of the good ones have already been mentioned (Chaiken is probably the best of them), but I'll throw "The Race" by James Schefter into the mix. It is interesting to read an account by a non-technical person who was caught in the middle of the whole shebang (Schefter was a journalist in Houston) - however, with the major disclaimer that some of the anecdotes he tells are of very dubious authenticity, that he significantly (and annoyingly) underplays Soviet achievements during the period and he comes across at times in the narrative as a bit of a weasel. There are also some technical errors (including some clearly incorrect photo captions) that don't help his overall credibility. However, it does give an interesting perspective of the feeling of the era and fleshes out some of the perhaps lesser-known but definitely major players (such as Bob Gilruth, James Webb, Max Faget, etc) of the Apollo project.

btw - I loved Kranz's 'Failure is not an Option'. Inspirational. I wish Sibrel had tried to pull his Buzz stunt on Krantz - he would have woken up 4 weeks later drinking liquids through a straw!

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-27, 04:00 PM
I was sitting out last night looking at the waxing gibbous Moon as it approaches Jupiter and Antares, and I still find it hard to believe that men were actually walking and driving around up there. What an accomplishment! It's a shame that it was almost 40 years ago and it may be another 10 years before it happens again. :sad:

Palomar
2007-Jun-27, 04:38 PM
I was sitting out last night looking at the waxing gibbous Moon as it approaches Jupiter and Antares, and I still find it hard to believe that men were actually walking and driving around up there. What an accomplishment! It's a shame that it was almost 40 years ago and it may be another 10 years before it happens again. :sad:

That's for sure. :mad: I remember thinking 1975's Apollo-Soyuz rendezvous was nothing by comparison. Then they rolled out the Shuttle (ho-hum *yawn*). We've been stuck in LEO all these decades since; what a pathetic farce.

When I was 10 [1975], I was expecting a manned landing on Mars by 1990!

Thanks to "Tricky Dicky" Nixon, who shot our true manned space exploration (which isn't going round and round the Earth dodging space junk) in the spacesuit boot.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-27, 07:50 PM
Thanks to "Tricky Dicky" Nixon, who shot our true manned space exploration (which isn't going round and round the Earth dodging space junk) in the spacesuit boot.

It wasn't just Nixon although he deserves some of the blame. The NASA budget had already peaked before he entered office. By Apollo 13, the TV networks were getting complaints about soap operas being preempted for Apollo coverage. There was a growing public perception of "been there, done that" that weaked public support and a desire to spend the money on other things (Democrats controlled Congress and Congress controls the budget). In short, there is plenty of blame to go around and pinning all of it on Nixon isn't reasonable or accurate.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-28, 09:24 AM
... By Apollo 13, the TV networks were getting complaints about soap operas being preempted for Apollo coverage...

I find this incredibly sad.

BTW, I was 2 months old during Apollo XIII, so didn't really care very much at the time.

Shortly before filming started on the Tom Hanks movie, I saw a Discovery Channel documentary about Apollo XIII that had me absolutely gripped. And I love the movie. IMO it did a good job of connecting the epic adventure of the Apollo programme to the human story of the people involved.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-28, 11:08 AM
[edit]Marketing was SO Space Age/Race oriented: From names of cars to restaurants to menu items, etc. Loved riding in my aunt and uncle's blue and white "Galaxy 500." Can still see glimpses of that era in (not surprisingly) Alamogordo, NM.Bet that was a Ford Galaxie 500. (http://www.hubcapcafe.com/i_rdr/2003/ford6701.jpg)

I shocked some of my skiing buddies when I took time off from the slopes in November 1967, to watch, on the lounge TV, the first launch of a Saturn V.

It was awe-inspiring, and funny too, when Walter Cronkite found himself being pelted by debris from his broadcast room's ceiling.

What a magnificent vehicle!

Palomar
2007-Jun-28, 12:17 PM
Bet that was a Ford Galaxie 500. (http://www.hubcapcafe.com/i_rdr/2003/ford6701.jpg)

Oh, it's spelled "Galaxie"? Theirs was a 4-door. Purred like a kitten. I wanted them to keep it until I was old enough to drive, but of course they weren't going to wait all those years. :lol:


I shocked some of my skiing buddies when I took time off from the slopes in November 1967, to watch, on the lounge TV, the first launch of a Saturn V.

I can't imagine anyone not wanting to watch a Saturn V launch -- especially live!


It was awe-inspiring, and funny too, when Walter Cronkite found himself being pelted by debris from his broadcast room's ceiling.

First I've heard of this. :) Not surprising, though; even watching video footage, it's so powerful you can FEEL it. And that roar...wow.


What a magnificent vehicle!

Oh yeah; Saturn V was -- and always will be -- the Royalty of Rockets.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-28, 12:46 PM
Oh, it's spelled "Galaxie"? Theirs was a 4-door. Purred like a kitten. I wanted them to keep it until I was old enough to drive, but of course they weren't going to wait all those years. :lol:There's a club out there. (http://www.galaxieclub.com/)
I can't imagine anyone not wanting to watch a Saturn V launch -- especially live! I love[d] skiing, but priorities are priorities!
First I've heard of this. :) Not surprising, though; even watching video footage, it's so powerful you can FEEL it. And that roar...wow.Check out the review by Amanda Bartels here (http://www.amazon.com/Mighty-Saturns-Saturn-Extended-Collectors/dp/B0001NBM5I).
Oh yeah; Saturn V was -- and always will be -- the Royalty of Rockets.It was one beautiful beast.

I used to deliberately underpower my Centauri Saturn V model rocket to simulate the slow, powerful liftoff. Of course there had to be no wind and the extended launch rail definitely helped.

The Saturn V: a truly magnificent achievement.

Moondust
2007-Jun-28, 10:39 PM
I still think the gold standard for astronaut books is Michael Collins "Carrying the Fire."

OneHotJupiter
2007-Jun-29, 02:24 AM
I've been thinking about Mike Collins book , I've heard great things , It is among the top of my Apollo wish list!

Also Commander Armstrongs book , which I've but skimmed through , looks to be another sweet point of view on the subject of Moonlandings!

Occam
2007-Jul-02, 07:56 PM
I will definitely be buying this one. I was 12 when Apollo 11 took place and have been a lifelong space geek. One of my favourite bits of memorabilia is a three hour video bought at the ground tracking station at Tidbinbilla. Aside from some fantastic mission video, there is a great deal of personal anecdotes from Al Shepard, Jim Lovell, John Glenn, Gordon Cooper, Wally Schirra etc. They were an extraordinary group of guys