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Maksutov
2007-Jun-26, 11:16 PM
The usual cliché re obsolete technological equipment is that "It's now a paperweight."

But some ingenious folks have come up with a way in one instance to avoid that trap. (http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bowls-out-of-Vinyl-Records)

There must be other ways to get additional life/uses out of similar things such as 386SX-16 chips, etc.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-26, 11:20 PM
Those poor records! (Also, wouldn't your bowl have a hole in the middle?)

Peter Wilson
2007-Jun-26, 11:25 PM
Holy bowly!

To think I sold mine at a garage sale :doh:

Noclevername
2007-Jun-26, 11:57 PM
Not with my vinyl they won't!

Maksutov
2007-Jun-27, 01:22 AM
Those poor records! (Also, wouldn't your bowl have a hole in the middle?)I'm sure if you wanted to make the bowl water-tight, you could soften another LP and then cut an appropriately-sized (1/4" IIRC) plug from it and place it in the hole. 45s would present more of a challenge.

Chuck
2007-Jun-27, 01:46 AM
You're supposed to make flower pots, not bowls.

sarongsong
2007-Jun-27, 01:51 AM
...There must be other ways to get additional life/uses out of similar things such as 386SX-16 chips, etc.Don't forget the special NASA-supplier pricing!
...When Mission 5A carries the U.S. Lab up to the space station, it will bring more than a dozen computers (based on an Intel 386 SX chip) and about one million lines of code. The computers control practically everything except locking the hatches and flushing the toilets...
James Oberg (http://www.jamesoberg.com/push.html)

Vermonter
2007-Jun-27, 04:20 AM
I use an old SIMM as a keychain. Works pretty well, too! I also had decorated my dorm door with various old computer parts - a laptop hard drive, an old DIMM, and a heatsink from a defunct video card.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-27, 05:26 AM
I'm sure if you wanted to make the bowl water-tight, you could soften another LP and then cut an appropriately-sized (1/4" IIRC) plug from it and place it in the hole. 45s would present more of a challenge.


Arrrgh! First they're warping them intentionally, now you want them to cut them up! Have you no mercy?

mickal555
2007-Jun-27, 07:20 AM
Hmm

You don't want to see what I did to a record I bought once.


I think you may be able to do a similar thing to CD's, they melt pretty easy too, although they tend to bubble.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-27, 07:30 AM
Hmm

You don't want to see what I did to a record I bought once.


I think you may be able to do a similar thing to CD's, they melt pretty easy too, although they tend to bubble.

:lol:

Reminds me of a test my Physics teacher told me about, he said that one of his previous students had drilled little holes in cds to see how much cd he could drill out before it stopped working.

Aparently it took over 10% of the cd to be gone before it stopped working

Gillianren
2007-Jun-27, 07:42 AM
Arrrgh! First they're warping them intentionally, now you want them to cut them up! Have you no mercy?

Or shame? I'm going to have to hide my box of records if you people come over; I can see this now.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-27, 09:20 AM
Or shame? I'm going to have to hide my box of records if you people come over; I can see this now.

Don't worry, I wouldn't do anything to them (except maybe ask you to copy them for me)

Nicolas
2007-Jun-27, 10:47 AM
Or shame? I'm going to have to hide my box of records if you people come over; I can see this now.

Box? I'm still figuring out how to take my records with me when I move in a couple of months. No one box will be able to do that job, unless you refer to sea containers as "a box" ;).

Oh btw the first guy to make a bowl from one of my records without my permission, can be sure he'll get a nice 1/4" spindle hole in his hands. ;)

Maksutov
2007-Jun-27, 12:04 PM
Box? I'm still figuring out how to take my records with me when I move in a couple of months. No one box will be able to do that job, unless you refer to sea containers as "a box" ;).If the sea container is subject to non-climate controlled conditions, you might find yourself with a large volume of bowl-making material.
Oh btw the first guy to make a bowl from one of my records without my permission, can be sure he'll get a nice 1/4" spindle hole in his hands. ;)That's OK, most of those folks have converted to digital and metric.

:)

Maksutov
2007-Jun-27, 01:04 PM
Meanwhile, lots of folks in their 50s and 60s are turning their turntables into pottery wheels. Some are even using them to make solar cookers (http://www.solarcooking.org/research/SpinningParaboicConcentrators.htm).

Swift
2007-Jun-27, 01:16 PM
Box? I'm still figuring out how to take my records with me when I move in a couple of months. No one box will be able to do that job, unless you refer to sea containers as "a box" ;).

I don't know if this is true in Europe, but the boxes that wine bottles or liquor bottles come in are very good sturdy boxes that are almost the perfect size for records. Most liquor stores in the the US just throw them out, so they are happy to give them to you.

djellison
2007-Jun-27, 01:25 PM
I turned the core from a Geforce 3 graphics card into a keyring once.

I tried it with an old Athlon processor - but the ceramic housing it sat on was just impossible to put a hole through - nothing would drill it!

Doug

SeanF
2007-Jun-27, 01:42 PM
:lol:

Reminds me of a test my Physics teacher told me about, he said that one of his previous students had drilled little holes in cds to see how much cd he could drill out before it stopped working.

Aparently it took over 10% of the cd to be gone before it stopped working
I think you could probably do it with one hole if you drilled it in the right place, but I'm not entirely sure.

For one thing, many CDs don't use nearly all the available space, so any holes drilled outside the used area won't have any effect on reading the CD at all. That's why those mini-CDs work in regular CD players. In that case, they've literally removed more than half the CD and it still plays. :)

Doodler
2007-Jun-27, 01:45 PM
I know several club DJs who would shoot those fools dead for desecrating vinyl like that. Some of the better drum & bass mixers swear by vinyl.

Nicolas
2007-Jun-27, 02:05 PM
If the sea container is subject to non-climate controlled conditions, you might find yourself with a large volume of bowl-making material.

------------------

That's OK, most of those folks have converted to digital and metric.

:)


Re the sea container thing, if those records survived years of basements and early mornings on carboot sales from the previous owners, they will survive a 2 hour drive. I said I was going to move, not that I was going interstellar. ;) :D As long as you keep them out of sunlight, heat and pressure (like, two hundred other records on top of it) and obviously away from aggressive products, you're fine. You can wash off whatever dirt gets spoiled over the records while moving them, no sweat. Well, also sweat of course, I didn't mean that, it's an expression. You can get sweat off, no sweat. *gets his medication*

Re being converted to metric: this part of the world didn't need to be converted, we saw the light just by ourselves. That's why we don't call them 12"ers but 30cm vinyl.
:)

You can indeed use an old turntable as a pottery spin table, but the bearing isn't meant to carry heavy loads so expect to have a broken table relatively soon if you place heavy pots on it. There's a reason why pottery tables aren't built exactly the same as turntables. :) For loads up to say 700g you should be fine and not cause any damage to the bearing. But a wet, thick clay pot tends to weigh "a bit more". But as most tables don't have the torque required to do this kind of pottery, it isn't relevant. You can stop even a strong turntable already when cleaning the platter with a cloth, so don't expect a free full blown pottery table from your old turntable. In order to "dry clean" light pots or spin for parabolic surfaces such as shown on that site, it's perfect of course. If you've got a nice old turntable, you can also sell it and make some good money on it, depending on the type.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-27, 02:40 PM
If it's still in use, it ain't "dead technology."

Soup Fan
2007-Jun-27, 03:04 PM
If any of you buggers come near my copy of 2112 I am bustin' out my shank!

Maksutov
2007-Jun-27, 03:06 PM
If it's still in use, it ain't "dead technology."Tell that to your 286.

Or your 8087 math coprocessor.

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Jun-27, 03:22 PM
Tell that to your 286. Or your 8087 math coprocessor.
But if those items are still in use, what's there to tell them?

One of the computers in my network (Parsifal II) is an almost 11 year old AMD 486 DX-100 based system. Got anything you'd like to tell it? :)

I have an even older and slower 486 system set aside for operating system experiments. (Imagine "experiments" being said here with a Peter Lorre-type voice!)

Swift
2007-Jun-27, 04:10 PM
I turned the core from a Geforce 3 graphics card into a keyring once.

I tried it with an old Athlon processor - but the ceramic housing it sat on was just impossible to put a hole through - nothing would drill it!

Doug
I turned an old RAM chip into a pin for my wife by glueing a pin-back onto it. Looks like some sort of high-tech insect, with the pin connectors as legs.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-27, 04:12 PM
But if those items are still in use, what's there to tell them?

One of the computers in my network (Parsifal II) is an almost 11 year old AMD 486 DX-100 based system. Got anything you'd like to tell it? :)

I have an even older and slower 486 system set aside for operating system experiments. (Imagine "experiments" being said here with a Peter Lorre-type voice!)"286", not "486"! :)

Meanwhile I imagine there are 8086s out there being used for word processing and Lotus 1,2,3 in companies so cheap they won't even buy toilet paper for their empoyees.

Whiny high-pitched voice:
And what kind of experiments would those be? Could you provide perhaps details? I would be very interested. Indeed, very interested.

(starts whistling "In The Hall Of The Mountain King")

Gillianren
2007-Jun-27, 06:58 PM
Box? I'm still figuring out how to take my records with me when I move in a couple of months. No one box will be able to do that job, unless you refer to sea containers as "a box" ;).

I came of age in the five years that tapes held sway; most of my music (still!) is on tape. But I've collected records in a minor way as well. It's a very heavy box.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-29, 10:14 AM
Tapes are great, too!

Combine them with toilet paper on Hallowe'en and one has produced a uniquely decorated house.

http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/figuren/k020.gif

Nicolas
2007-Jun-29, 10:47 AM
I came of age in the five years that tapes held sway; most of my music (still!) is on tape. But I've collected records in a minor way as well. It's a very heavy box.

Compact cassette or reel to reel tapes?

I've stayed away from RtR, but I've got a collection of compact cassettes. Legal, official MC's that is. About 50-60 I think.

Last year, IIRC 200 prerecorded compact cassettes (MusiCassettes or MC's) were sold in Belgium. I bought two (new in store, carboot sales obviously don't count) in that year. That's right, and I think it's very cool: I lived in a time where I was responsible for 1% of the annual MC sales in Belgium. :D And it cost me the whole 4 or 5 euros...

Gillianren
2007-Jun-29, 06:34 PM
Compact cassette or reel to reel tapes?

I've stayed away from RtR, but I've got a collection of compact cassettes. Legal, official MC's that is. About 50-60 I think.

Oh, reel-to-reel is far more work than I'm capable of. Besides, Pearl Jam and REM didn't release on reel-to-reel.

Fazor
2007-Jun-29, 06:50 PM
Oh, reel-to-reel is far more work than I'm capable of. Besides, Pearl Jam and REM didn't release on reel-to-reel.
PJ was really popular when I was in school, but I never listened to them. Now that I've picked up the guitar, I'm getting more into their stuff. It's funny, there's some stuff that is alright, and then you learn how fun it is to play and sing and suddenly you see it in a whole new light.

Peter Wilson
2007-Jun-29, 07:13 PM
Agreed! Its like looking at the moon through a telescope: suddenly, your hear it in a whole new sound!

:)

Fazor
2007-Jun-29, 07:38 PM
Speaking of old music (okay, so still relatively young), I grabbed my Full Devil Jacket cd and threw it in today for a listen. Man I love this CD. I never knew much (okay, I never knew anything) about this band. But they were at Ozzfest the first year I went ('99 I think), and we missed their performance. So I got the CD. Very good stuff. Too bad the band disbanded shortly after. Lead singer's near fatal OD turned him christian. Gave up rockstar life. yadda yadda yadda. :(

(Okay, okay. I'm happy for him, atleast about the giving up drugs part).

Despite the name, they're not a particularly obsene band. I suggest check'n them out if you can find it. I'm just dissapointed they never published a guitar tab book (or if they did, it's long gone now). I'll haveta figure some of these out myself, but as a guitar novice, thats not the easiest for me.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-30, 01:13 AM
I can think of a number of bands that should be obscene and not heard.

ktesibios
2007-Jun-30, 07:42 AM
I think you could probably do it with one hole if you drilled it in the right place, but I'm not entirely sure.


Unlikely. The data on a CD is interleaved in such a way as to prevent a short burst error from knocking out more data than the error correction scheme can restore. A gouge that follows an arc of a circle concentric with the CD would do a better job of creating an audible artifact. Of course, if you made the hole big enough...

Digital storage systems can be remarkably robust. Back in the days when we were still using reel-to-reel digital multitrack recorders, I saw a Mitsubishi X-850 32-track machine play a tape that had a 1/4" hole punched right on its centerline without any audible effect. When the hole went over the repro head the CRC error LEDs lit up like a casino, but the sound was unaffected. The PD format had some good error-correction processing.

BTW, in the pro audio world tube gear made for the recording and broadcast industries in the '50s and '60s is not only still in use, some items are so popular and pricey that DSP plug-ins to emulate them on a digital workstation are selling well. Since I make my living by working on this stuff, my idea of "dead" technology might be a bit different from most peoples'.

m1omg
2007-Jun-30, 08:58 PM
www.lowendmac.com , even BW compact Mac Plus could be used for net

SeanF
2007-Jul-01, 04:57 AM
Unlikely. The data on a CD is interleaved in such a way as to prevent a short burst error from knocking out more data than the error correction scheme can restore. A gouge that follows an arc of a circle concentric with the CD would do a better job of creating an audible artifact. Of course, if you made the hole big enough...
I was thinking of a hole that corrupted the TOC...