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ToSeek
2007-Jun-28, 08:35 PM
Could You Pass 8th Grade Science? (http://mingle2.com/science-quiz)

92% for me - I think I got 11 and 13 wrong.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-28, 09:04 PM
I got 96%, probably because I had to guess on one of the answers. The test was annoyingly slow to respond to mouse clicks.

Fazor
2007-Jun-28, 09:05 PM
Holy Handgrenades (of Antioch, batman?), got a 100%! How's them apples? (sorry had to gloat, as traditionally I score about the lowest in the forums for these things).

PS: It's been a while since you linked one of these things ToSeek; glad they made a return.

PPS: Unless you've still posted some in Fun&Games, I don't venture into that section of BAUT much anymore.

Mister Earl
2007-Jun-28, 09:17 PM
96% as well. I think I got the meteor/meteorite/meteoroid one wrong.

Moose
2007-Jun-28, 09:19 PM
84%. One I got because I read too darn fast. The other three, well, I read the question wrong or simply could not remember.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-28, 09:25 PM
B-, but I think I defined a question or two differently than they did. (And yeah, that is a very slow site.)

Trebuchet
2007-Jun-28, 09:41 PM
92%. I didn't figure out to watch the "thermometer" bar for a change to see if I'd gotten it right until near the end so I'm not sure what I missed.

Some of the questions are incomplete at best. The tides, for instance, are apparently caused only by the moon's gravity, without assistance from the sun. And the acceleration of gravity is exactly 10 m/sec. I suppose the value of pi is exactly 3 as well.

folkhemmet
2007-Jun-28, 09:44 PM
Fun quiz, as science always tied with social studies for my favorite subject.

Mister Earl said: "I think I got the meteor/meteorite/meteoroid one wrong." Yup, I am pretty sure I also missed that one. But hey, it's hard to complain about an A- (92%).

Noclevername
2007-Jun-28, 09:44 PM
92%, and I'm not sure all the questions were 8th grade material. I'm pretty sure I learned some of that stuff in 5th grade-- not sure it was from school, though.

Moose
2007-Jun-28, 09:45 PM
And the acceleration of gravity is exactly 10 m/sec. I suppose the value of pi is exactly 3 as well.

Well, that one's fair enough. Yeah, it's not good enough for engineering, but it's good enough to demonstrate 8th grade knowledge of acceleration. Then again, it's not like it's especially hard to multiply 9.8 by 10.

pghnative
2007-Jun-28, 10:00 PM
B+ (88%). Some quibbles:

a) the rock question depends on one's definition of "deep", though if i knew more about some of the types of rock, maybe I'd have known the right answer. Spoiler (highlight to read: After all, sedimentary rock is buried in the crust too)

b) the tide question, though i got it right, seems to technically have two correct answers, though one answer is "more right". (Spoiler: The sun also affects tides)

c) I'm not sure i agree with the muscle/tendon answer. (Spoiler: Seems to me that muscles are more like a pulley than a lever)

edited to add: i see Trebuchet already commented about the tides whilst I was typing. But I'm OK with the 10m/s/s question --- after all, to one significant figure, that is the correct value. My actual first thought on reading that question was "Gee, what about air resistance")

Lord Jubjub
2007-Jun-28, 10:18 PM
92% A-. But I challenge one question!

Their question of respiration is hazy. Respiration in mammals usually refers to the exchange of oxygen in the lungs. As such it is purely aerobic. The overwhelming amount of energy produced by mammals is done by aerobic processes. I was tempted to give the answer they wanted, but wasn't sure of the context. The other one I missed was the meteor/meteroid question and I knew I had guessed wrong as soon as I clicked.

As for the elbow question, I helped my 8th grade nephew review a worksheet with that question on it.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-28, 10:23 PM
c) I'm not sure i agree with the muscle/tendon answer.

Spoiler: Well, a pulley needs a wheel.

Jim
2007-Jun-28, 10:36 PM
I haven't taken it... too many bad memories.

No, no, not that kind!

My stepmother taught 8th grade science for several years after she married my father. She'd bring papers home with her and sometimes I'd help her grade them. (I was in college at the time.)

Our family name can be difficult to spell, so I wasn't bothered by the test papers that had it wrong. But, I reached my limit with the poor student (both meanings of the word) who misspelled his own last name!

mike alexander
2007-Jun-28, 10:47 PM
You can tell either a nonscientist or a committee came up with those. The rock one was annoying; plenty of metamorphic outcroppings right on the surface, or we wouldn't see many marble statues. Tectonic plates sliding past each other can certianly produce volcanoes; I see one from my driveway every day it's clear enough. The mammal respiration one is a sneaky gotcha; some guy with a false sense of superiority must've had a real chuckle writing that one.

cjl
2007-Jun-28, 11:05 PM
96%...

(Missed one by going too fast...)

Nicolas
2007-Jun-28, 11:16 PM
A mere 80%...

SPOILERS!!!

The ones I got wrong: the respiration thing (forgot about muscular anaerobic activity), the meteor(oid) thing (my bad :)), the transpiration thing (I didn't understand who was losing water: the atmosphere or the plant, from the way the question was formulated). The arm: I don't think that's a particularly good example of a lever. Especially since attached pulleys, which resemble arms, are both pulley and lever systems. Eat that, 8th graders ;). And metamorphic rock. Never even heard that word, might be a language thing. Oh, and I've had a 10 hour day of programming behind me and it's 1:30 in the night overhere. :D

One last thing, 8th graders should know that 21/26 is 81% and not 80% as the site claims...

cjl
2007-Jun-28, 11:23 PM
Arms are fairly definitely levers. Not the standard first class levers, admittedly, with the fulcrum between the load and the force, but rather a third class lever, with the force between the fulcrum and the load.

(Actually, if you really want to look at it, they are third class when using the biceps, and first class when using the triceps)

pghnative
2007-Jun-28, 11:37 PM
Arms are fairly definitely levers. Not the standard first class levers, admittedly, with the fulcrum between the load and the force, but rather a third class lever, with the force between the fulcrum and the load. Interesting -- will need to look up this class business of levers. I've never learned (or don't remember) anything other than the standard "crowbar" kind of lever.

mike alexander
2007-Jun-28, 11:43 PM
Glad to hear that my triceps is first class.

I agree my biceps is third class, though. Never could do chinups worth a darn.

Nicolas
2007-Jun-28, 11:46 PM
I still find it a bad example. As you say, this simple machine isn't a first class lever, and with the force application points that close to the joint (especially the triceps which goes partially around the elbow) it starts to resemble this kind of limited rotation angle, fixed cable end pulley system (http://www.aerokopter.co.za/Pictures&buttons/Pictures/Large%20pixel%20photos/Component%20photos%20Doc/Anti%20torque%20cable%20control%20pulley.JPG). Of course that pulley also applies lever principles. Which only underlines this thing is not a good example. They say "when you bend your arm" so in that case only the biceps applies and it becomes clearer they mean a lever. But if you want a clear lever example, take a seesaw. :) The arm example clearly doesn't work after midnight, while I can safely say I know what a lever is. :)

btw here, with only the biceps drawn, it is far more clearly:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13910/13910-h/images/fig09b-25.png

pghnative: classes or orders of levers are determined by the order of applied force, load and pivot. Obviously "first" and "third" are sometimes defined the other way around...but anyway here's one definition:
FPL = 3rd order (seesaw)
FLP = 2nd order (wheelbarrow)
LFP = first order (erm, erm tweezers, but the load here is a pressure force rather than a gravitational one. The arm drawing above also is this kind of system, cjl simply used the other definition.)

)

yuzuha
2007-Jun-29, 12:06 AM
I got this one wrong "Is the offspring of an asexual organism genetically identical to its parent? " They have "yes," which is normally true, but I was thinking that some asexual organisms do exchange some genetic material and would not be genetically identical in the sense of a clone. Aspergillus niger for example (soil fungus) can exchange genetic material via parasexual reproduction. Bacteria also sometimes share genetic material via conjugation.

Chuck
2007-Jun-29, 12:14 AM
I got 100%. I've read a lot of popular science books so I have a good overview but no depth. I can pass an 8th grade test but am unlikely to win a Nobel prize any time soon.

publius
2007-Jun-29, 01:07 AM
96%. I blew transpiration. No fair, cause transpiration is a type of evaporation...... :lol:

-Richard

Maksutov
2007-Jun-29, 01:11 AM
Got 96%.

Messed up on the aerobic, etc., one

But as Peter Noone once sang, "Don't know much biology..."

As usual with a lot of quizzes the questions could have been worded better and as is are subject to interpretations.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-29, 01:14 AM
I got 100%. I've read a lot of popular science books so I have a good overview but no depth. I can pass an 8th grade test but am unlikely to win a Nobel prize any time soon.No big deal there. Remember, the Nobel Prizes are a conspiracy by mainstream science to keep the wonderful and significant findings of ATMers out of the spotlight.

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif

Hornblower
2007-Jun-29, 01:54 AM
I missed 11 and 14. I did not know exactly what they meant by "respire". I figured no air, no respiration, and that anaerobic activity was a drawdown on nutrients and oxygen already in place.

I stand by my answer on 14. To me "final" means the velocity after the stone sinks and comes to rest on the bottom.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-29, 02:42 AM
And metamorphic rock. Never even heard that word, might be a language thing.

"Metamorphic" refers to rock that started as sedimentary or igneous and was changed by heat and pressure into different kinds of rock. I got it wrong because it is wrong; there's igneous a-plenty deep underground, and as mentioned, there's metamorphic a-plenty on the surface.

Further, asexual organisms aren't automatically identical to their parents, as a moment's thought would make perfectly clear--if all asexual organisms were identical to their parents, there would be no evolution of asexual organisms, and we would not be around to ask the question in the first place. They are very, very close to their parents, but mutations do occur.

Jens
2007-Jun-29, 02:59 AM
84%. But I also got one wrong because I read it too fast (come to think of it, I probably did the same in 8th grade!). I misread "tides" as "waves" and chose the wind.

hhEb09'1
2007-Jun-29, 04:38 AM
100%, but yeah you had to know where they're coming from. I've taught some 8th grade science. :)

I don't usually think of seismic waves as shock waves, but the gravity question did say "assume g is 10/m/s2"

Maksutov
2007-Jun-29, 05:33 AM
100%, but yeah you had to know where they're coming from. I've taught some 8th grade science. :)...Eighth grade is definitely not high school, junior!

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-29, 12:03 PM
Could You Pass 8th Grade Science? (http://mingle2.com/science-quiz)

92% for me - I think I got 11 and 13 wrong.
I got the same score and same wrong answers, does that mean I'm toseeked?

I took it before reading the thread, and hhEb09'1 is right. You do have to consider the level. Some of you are correct, but out of context (IMO).

Fazor
2007-Jun-29, 01:23 PM
I'm not complaining. As long as they stay "8th-Grade Superficial" then I'm golden. Come to think of it, I got a perfect score on the science section of the ACT as well. But that was then. Taking the test now would probably put me in some sort of "special" post-secondary school. :-P

tlbs101
2007-Jun-29, 03:57 PM
My work-server is blocking that website. :(

I guess I'll never know if I'm smarter than an 8th-grader.

.

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-29, 04:16 PM
My work-server is blocking that website. :(
I guess I'll never know if I'm smarter than an 8th-grader.
.
At least we know you're not smarter than a firewall. :lol:

jfribrg
2007-Jun-29, 06:09 PM
96% for me, although if it were a real test, I would argue that a couple of the questions were nebulous. I also would have gotten 100% if I had sat through the classes that preceeded this test.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-29, 08:41 PM
88% for me. Got the simple machine question, the meteorite question, and the respiration question wrong (go figure).

I thought the correct term for the 'meteorite' question was 'asteroid' until the rock actually entered the atmosphere.

Oh well.

Jerry
2007-Jun-29, 09:16 PM
No big deal there. Remember, the Nobel Prizes are a conspiracy by mainstream science to keep the wonderful and significant findings of ATMers out of the spotlight.

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif
Nobody ever tells me anything!

My wife tutors eighth grade science, so we go over the questions quite often. It's not unusual for the technically correct answer to be different from the eighth grade answer; likewise freshmen physics is qualified...but then,
some of the graduate level concepts are wrong, too;)

Jerry
2007-Jun-29, 09:22 PM
No big deal there. Remember, the Nobel Prizes are a conspiracy by mainstream science to keep the wonderful and significant findings of ATMers out of the spotlight.

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif
Nobody ever tells me anything!

My wife tutors eighth grade science, so we go over the questions quite often. It's not unusual for the technically correct answer to be different from the eighth grade answer; likewise freshmen physics is qualified...but then,
some of the graduate level concepts are wrong, too;)

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-30, 12:38 AM
Nobody ever tells me anything!

My wife tutors eighth grade science, so we go over the questions quite often. It's not unusual for the technically correct answer to be different from the eighth grade answer; likewise freshmen physics is qualified...but then,
some of the graduate level concepts are wrong, too;)

How did you post the same post twice??

Noclevername
2007-Jun-30, 12:50 AM
Nobody ever tells me anything!

My wife tutors eighth grade science, so we go over the questions quite often. It's not unusual for the technically correct answer to be different from the eighth grade answer; likewise freshmen physics is qualified...but then,
some of the graduate level concepts are wrong, too;)

So they're teaching kids inaccurate information. So what else is new?

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-30, 02:03 AM
B+ (88%). Some quibbles:

a) the rock question depends on one's definition of "deep", though if i knew more about some of the types of rock, maybe I'd have known the right answer. Spoiler (highlight to read: After all, sedimentary rock is buried in the crust too)

b) the tide question, though i got it right, seems to technically have two correct answers, though one answer is "more right". (Spoiler: The sun also affects tides)

c) I'm not sure i agree with the muscle/tendon answer. (Spoiler: Seems to me that muscles are more like a pulley than a lever)

edited to add: i see Trebuchet already commented about the tides whilst I was typing. But I'm OK with the 10m/s/s question --- after all, to one significant figure, that is the correct value. My actual first thought on reading that question was "Gee, what about air resistance")
Pretty much what pghnative said. I missed three: the rock one (which isn't surprising), the muscle/tendon one (when I didn't read all the answers) and the respiration one (which I second-guessed).

Lurker
2007-Jun-30, 02:20 AM
Could You Pass 8th Grade Science?

Noooooo, but I could be elected president of the United States!!! That's the beauty of this great country of ours!!!!! :razz:

ToSeek
2007-Jun-30, 03:34 AM
88% for me. Got the simple machine question, the meteorite question, and the respiration question wrong (go figure).

I thought the correct term for the 'meteorite' question was 'asteroid' until the rock actually entered the atmosphere.

Oh well.

No, it's a "meteoroid" when it's flying around in space. In the atmosphere, it's a "meteor", and when it lands it's a "meteorite."

Jerry
2007-Jun-30, 04:44 AM
How did you post the same post twice??
You know how teachers are: If you don't get it right the first time...

Gillianren
2007-Jun-30, 05:12 AM
So they're teaching kids inaccurate information. So what else is new?

The authors of The Science of Discworld (okay, the ones who aren't Terry Pratchett) refer to it as "lies-to-children," meaning explanations that are wrong but a step in the right direction toward the real answer. That said, I wouldn't want my eight-grader, assuming I had one, taught some of the things mentioned that we've known were wrong but the test said were right, even if it is a simpler explanation. In the case of the rock one, I don't see how it gets us to the right one. And I learned that distinction well before eighth grade; it isn't that complicated.

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-30, 05:51 AM
88% for me. Got the simple machine question, the meteorite question, and the respiration question wrong (go figure).

I thought the correct term for the 'meteorite' question was 'asteroid' until the rock actually entered the atmosphere.

Oh well.
No, it's a "meteoroid" when it's flying around in space. In the atmosphere, it's a "meteor", and when it lands it's a "meteorite."
In addition, these three terms do not describe only rocky objects, but any object that fits the definitions ToSeek gave. Most meteors, in fact, are chunks of ice that come from comets.

Chuck
2007-Jun-30, 06:05 AM
If a meteor lands in the water and is sinking, what is it called? It hasn't stopped yet so it's not a meteorite, but it's not in the atmosphere nor in space either.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-30, 06:13 AM
If a meteor lands in the water and is sinking, what is it called?...Wet.

cjl
2007-Jun-30, 06:53 AM
If a meteor lands in the water and is sinking, what is it called? It hasn't stopped yet so it's not a meteorite, but it's not in the atmosphere nor in space either.

I'd say it's landed, so it's a wet meteorite.

yuzuha
2007-Jun-30, 04:27 PM
"Metamorphic" refers to rock that started as sedimentary or igneous and was changed by heat and pressure into different kinds of rock. I got it wrong because it is wrong; there's igneous a-plenty deep underground, and as mentioned, there's metamorphic a-plenty on the surface.


True, but then I remembered all those tv shows and ed films where whenever they mention igneous rocks they show some volcano spewing lava, and when they talk metamorphic, they usually show some marble quarry so I figured they were looking for a dumbed down answer.

I probably would have got the asexual reproduction one correct if they'd have said "usually" or "nearly" identical to jolt me out of my nit-picky rut ^-^

hhEb09'1
2007-Jun-30, 04:33 PM
If a meteor lands in the water and is sinking, what is it called? It hasn't stopped yet so it's not a meteorite, but it's not in the atmosphere nor in space either.Did you get permission from the copyright holder (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=15418#post15418) for that post? :)

SeanF
2007-Jul-01, 02:08 AM
If a meteor lands in the water and is sinking, what is it called? It hasn't stopped yet so it's not a meteorite, but it's not in the atmosphere nor in space either.
How about we just say it's a meteorite once it's no longer in free-fall? :)

Which leads us to another question, though - at what point do we delineate the atmosphere from space, to separate meteors from meteoroids? Doesn't the atmosphere just get gradually and progressively thinner?

cjl
2007-Jul-01, 02:33 AM
Usually, the boundary is accepted to be about 100km, though there is some slight atmosphere above that. Nothing that is meaningful to anything but long term orbits though - aerodynamic heating of any significant amount doesn't really start until below 80km IIRC.

foreignkid
2007-Jul-01, 04:01 AM
100%

HOWEVER (there always is one), some of us may have unintentionally cheated. I found that if you clicked on the right answer twice before the page reloaded, the "thermometer" would jump up twice as much as it was supposed to. So, scores are most likely not reliable. I know for a fact that I missed the meteor/oid/ite question, so I could not have gotten 100%.

cjl
2007-Jul-01, 04:17 AM
Interesting - I can get it WAY past the A marking, but it still only says 100%...