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Disinfo Agent
2007-Jun-29, 10:13 PM
Which one would you pick? (http://www.new7wonders.com/index.php)

Lianachan
2007-Jun-29, 11:16 PM
I'd forgotten all about that - I voted ages and ages ago. So long ago, in fact, that I can't remember what I voted for!

Not Stonehenge, anyway, for two reasons:

1) It's older than all of the original 7 wonders, and
2) It's rubbish anyway. Far more impressive, and less busy, stone arrangements up here.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-30, 05:17 AM
I'd forgotten all about that - I voted ages and ages ago. So long ago, in fact, that I can't remember what I voted for!

Ditto. I wish the Pyramids weren't an option, as they are indeed one of the old wonders, and the only one still standing at that. (As I recall, when I voted, they weren't, more sort of an honourable mention thing.)

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jun-30, 05:03 PM
The Pyramids are no longer an option. They've been included as an honorary wonder.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-30, 05:09 PM
I'd forgotten all about that - I voted ages and ages ago. So long ago, in fact, that I can't remember what I voted for!

Not Stonehenge, anyway, for two reasons:

1) It's older than all of the original 7 wonders, and
2) It's rubbish anyway. Far more impressive, and less busy, stone arrangements up here.

Where are the predecessors: Woodhenge and Strawhenge?

Lianachan
2007-Jun-30, 05:19 PM
Where are the predecessors: Woodhenge and Strawhenge?

There are few places called Woodhenge, as it happens. The one in England is actually near to Stonehenge.

Perhaps some of the (many) plain, earth bank and ditch henges have simply had their straw blown away.......

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-30, 05:21 PM
There are few places called Woodhenge, as it happens. The one in England is actually near to Stonehenge.

Perhaps some of the (many) plain, earth bank and ditch henges have simply had their straw blown away.......

It was an Eddie Izzard joke. :)

EDIT: From his stand-up routine "Dress to Kill"

Lianachan
2007-Jun-30, 05:54 PM
It was an Eddie Izzard joke. :)

EDIT: From his stand-up routine "Dress to Kill"

Yes, I know. My sister in law thinks he's great.

cjl
2007-Jun-30, 10:27 PM
Well, there's always Carhenge:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/61/A_Yool_Carhenge1_02Sep03_exif.jpg/800px-A_Yool_Carhenge1_02Sep03_exif.jpg

foreignkid
2007-Jul-01, 07:41 AM
I'd go for the Alhambra. It is really breathtaking, much "moor" so than the rest of the wonders.

jumbo
2007-Jul-01, 12:13 PM
Macchu Picchu is a fantastic place. Did the trail to it last year. It was a let down at first that after 4 days walk in good conditions it rained as we got there but then seeing the clouds pass below the settlement and the drop offs in most directions its an impressive place to be.

foreignkid
2007-Jul-02, 04:23 AM
Wow, I just realized I've seen (personally) 10 out of the 21 up for grabs. I feel good...

Nicolas
2007-Jul-02, 04:06 PM
I've seen the Eiffel tower from a large distance (from the highway near Charles de Gaulle IIRC), and Stonehenge also from the highway. So that's not a lot :).

However, there are many very impressive structures. When I first entered the (still unfinished atm) renewed Antwerp Central Station I said to my SO: "it doesn't hurt people when they build something slightly over the top from time to time". And that's the feeling I get with anything that IMO would form a candidate for "wonder of the world": something really impressive, more than strictly necessary or than the easiest solution, something that makes you think about the effort/creativity it cost to create it and/or design it and makes you proud that humans created this.

I can't really pick 7 from the 21 candidates, never mind from every candidate I could come up with.

Peter Wilson
2007-Jul-02, 04:21 PM
I wonder where socks lost in the laundry go?

I wonder why the grass is always greener on the other side?

I wonder if the U.S. was the only country to be hit by the Pet Rock epidemic?

I wonder what women really want :confused:

NEOWatcher
2007-Jul-02, 04:35 PM
I've seen the Eiffel tower from a large distance (from the highway near Charles de Gaulle IIRC), and Stonehenge also from the highway. So that's not a lot :).
I've been in 4, and seen another.

...And that's the feeling I get with anything that IMO would form a candidate for "wonder of the world"
My sentiments too:
Basically; I consider a wonder of the world to be: "I wonder how they were able to do that considering..."

Now for this particular "contest", I think there should be a better description of what the list is supposed to convey.
There is no definition as to what a wonder should be. There is an exclusion for technology, and they don't make it clear what the word "new" refers to.
Is it a new list (therefore the pyramid applies)
Is it for new things (like things built after the original list - apparently not)
Is it for new things that were not considered for the original list.
There is no knowledgable authoritative sponsor.
They also say it should be "universally recognizable"... Why? If it is a little known wonder, then why not nominate it?

The original list was a "must see" list. Now, in that vain, it fits to be a popularity contest. But; why take that intermediate step of having a panel of "experts" take it from 77 places down to 21?

I have heard people say ancient stuff is not applicable because it's not new.

I can't really pick 7 from the 21 candidates, never mind from every candidate I could come up with.[/quote]

Gillianren
2007-Jul-02, 06:51 PM
I wonder what women really want :confused:

To be asked?

Nicolas
2007-Jul-02, 07:39 PM
The question is not what women really want, the question is who women really want.

The answer involves an astronomy board and over 10.000 posts, or so I hope ;)

Doodler
2007-Jul-02, 07:55 PM
1) The Chunnel (Britain/France)
2) Eiffel Tower (France)
3) The Palm Islands (Dubai)
4) Golden Gate Bridge (USA)
5) Panama Canal (Panama)
6) Three Gorges Dam (China)
7) International Space Station (various, pending completion)


To heck with the old crap. The wonders of the old world were living breathing parts of their era. As should the modern wonders be.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-02, 09:15 PM
The question is not what women really want, the question is who women really want.

The answer involves an astronomy board and over 10.000 posts, or so I hope ;)

I couldn't handle it unless one of us were willing to move to the other's country, Nicolas. I hate long-distance relationships!

Nicolas
2007-Jul-02, 09:35 PM
I couldn't handle it unless your current boyfriend wasn't in the military :D ;)

Seriously though, for 5 years my SO has been living at a distance that allowed us to only see each other in the weekends, and I'm quite tired of that. Working on the problem though, in a few months time I'm moving! :)

I can only praise myself lucky there's fully open borders and the same currency now, so moving across the border is no different than traveling inside the country. But still, it's time I have 1 living place instead of 3. I go across the border like some people go to the mall :).

edit: erm just how far off topic are we! :D

To get this back on topic: traveling that much means that I visit the earlier mentioned Antwerp Central Station twice a week on average. There you have it, back to a minor Wonder of the World.

I hope they'll put some good pics online when it's completely finished. On one hand you've got the old station which is very impressive. It used to have more metal ornaments on the main train hall than nowadays and two clock towers, but other than that it's still in original condition, and the access bridge including all towers is being completely renovated. On the other hand you've got a new section involving 3 underground levels, two of which have train platforms (seeing large trains at 3 levels on top of each other is impressive!). And all that in a visually stunning way: you can see from the bottom of the lowest level train platforms upto the top of the "cathedral" hangar, and the internal facade of the station building.

Even the original (over 100 years old IIRC) bumpers at the end of the top level platforms are a mini wonder. They're huge bumpers with hydraulic dampers, massively strong and extremely well anchored into the floor, and their purpose is to slow down and preferably stop a train that would enter the station and not break enough. Because if that happens on the top level and the train isn't stopped, it goes straight inside the main station building and with enough speed, may end up in front of the entrance of the Zoo ; :).

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-02, 09:54 PM
1) The Chunnel (Britain/France)
2) Eiffel Tower (France)
3) The Palm Islands (Dubai)
4) Golden Gate Bridge (USA)
5) Panama Canal (Panama)
6) Three Gorges Dam (China)
7) International Space Station (various, pending completion)


To heck with the old crap. The wonders of the old world were living breathing parts of their era. As should the modern wonders be.

I completely agree!! Where are the Hubble Space Telescope and the Large Hadron Collider? What about the Human Genome Project? What about the Space Shuttle?

Where are the natural wonders? Where are the Great Barrier Reef and the Amazon Rainforest?

All the objects on that list are rehashed from old world wonders. Yes, they are wonderful, but let's get some new blood in the list. Bah!

Nicolas
2007-Jul-02, 09:55 PM
1) The Chunnel (Britain/France)
2) Eiffel Tower (France)
3) The Palm Islands (Dubai)
4) Golden Gate Bridge (USA)
5) Panama Canal (Panama)
6) Three Gorges Dam (China)
7) International Space Station (various, pending completion)


To heck with the old crap. The wonders of the old world were living breathing parts of their era. As should the modern wonders be.

Your take on it only underlines my point that I could come up with so many small and large "wonders of the world", even when sticking to buildings/monuments.

The Saturn V on display. The VAB. Nuclear power plants with huge cooling towers. That beautiful new bridge in France. The Chrysler building (because its prrrrrrrrrrretty!!). etcetcetc.

foreignkid
2007-Jul-03, 03:36 AM
Where are the natural wonders? Where are the Great Barrier Reef and the Amazon Rainforest?

But that's not really the point. It's like making a list of the greatest cars on the planet (theoretically). Then, someone jumps out of the the (theoretical) audience and yells "Hey, what about boats, why not include them in the list?"

The Wonders of the World are meant to be HUMAN-made, and to impress the Average Joe. I doubt ol' Joey knows what the Large Hadron Collider does. And he definitely doesn't care for the HST, 'cause hey, it's just a friggin' big piece of glass, right?

I do agree that it has become more of a popularity contest than a thorough judging of "inspiration" (Latin: in + spiro = in + breath: given breath)

Doodler
2007-Jul-03, 12:03 PM
I completely agree!! Where are the Hubble Space Telescope and the Large Hadron Collider? What about the Human Genome Project? What about the Space Shuttle?

The wonders tended to be physical objects, so the HGP is out, the shuttles aren't singular objects. The Discovery alone might qualify, considering that its lead something of a charmed life having flown us back into space after both critical setbacks in the program.

Aircraft are tough in that regard, at least to me. Maybe one would be the Wright Flyer.

Hubble would certainly be an interesting entry, but the ISS trumps it in my mind because of its more intrinsically human element. Seeing the edge of space is one thing, actually putting humans into space full time with cooperation across so many borders, that's impressive. But then again, here comes Bigelow Aerospace with the first privately financed space stations coming up. So there again, we have another REALLY extraordinary achievement.

The big problem with the modern world is so few things are permanent enough to qualify. Buildings are kinda trite, because they're going up so fast, with newer technology, what was once a monumental undertaking is just another day at the office. To qualify as a wonder, you've really got to go over the top.

Ships? Again, hardly unique, even if monumental. Big ships are just another part of our lives, so none really stand out.

As far as the ones I selected, considering them "modern" wonders, I've limited myself to 1900 on.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-03, 12:18 PM
I didn't see any space exploration rockets or telescopes in there, or dams, freighters, skyscrapers, computers, PET scan equipment, etc., (just a lot of churches and so on), so I didn't vote for any of them.

Makes you wonder.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-03, 12:21 PM
[edit]I wonder what women really want :confused:I have a cartoon from The New Yorker that answers that question.

It shows two guys at a bar. One is listening while the other is talking. He's saying
I know what women want. Her lawyer told me.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jul-03, 02:31 PM
I wonder why the grass is always greener on the other side?

I wonder what women really want :confused:

Something they don't have. Whatever they have, they want something else.

Closely related to grass-is-greener issue.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-03, 06:41 PM
Something they don't have. Whatever they have, they want something else.

Yeah. I want my boyfriend to come home.

edward2007
2007-Jul-04, 03:28 PM
1] a budding flower
2] every newborn child
3] the rainbow
4] a lover's kiss
5] the stars in the nightsky
6] human's ability to admire beauty
7] love

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-04, 03:33 PM
Spoil sport. :p ;)

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-04, 03:36 PM
Macchu Picchu is a fantastic place. Did the trail to it last year. It was a let down at first that after 4 days walk in good conditions it rained as we got there but then seeing the clouds pass below the settlement and the drop offs in most directions its an impressive place to be.

Yes! :clap: I"ve seen it so many times in docs and movies. It's on my list of places to visit. It must be breath-taking to see in person.

Argos
2007-Jul-04, 05:01 PM
Theyīve included Rioīs Christ, the redeemer (http://www.new7wonders.com/fileadmin/resources/candidates/Christ_the_Redeemer-lge2.jpg) [by Paul Landowski]. I donīt like it. A dreadful example of art deco, IMO, and the fact that itīs placed atop a mountain does not make it a wonder. We brazilians would be better off with Itaipu dam (http://www.britannica.com/ebc/art/print?id=73273&articleTypeId=0), which is the same order of magnitude of 3 gorges, and has been around for 30 years, or the Rio-Niteroi bridge (http://www.transportes.gov.br/bit/pontes/RJ/rio_niteroi/Ptrnit01.jpg).

From the 'official' list Iīd go with the Eiffel tower, the statue of liberty, Alhambra, Petra, The great Chinese wall, Neuschwanstein Castle, and Iīm divided between the Acropolis and the Taj Mahal.

Yeah, itīs a shame that scientific and technologial wonders, like the ITER and the LHC are not on the list.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-04, 05:09 PM
Christ the redeemer indeed is a bit a strange entry. The statue is not especially large, or over the top, or extremely beautiful [subjective]. Sure, it's got a huge impact as a landmark, but so do the HOLLYWOOD letters.

As for castles/fortresses, aren't there a lot more possibilities than just Neuschwanstein?

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-04, 05:13 PM
The Alhambra itself was built around a castle, but Neuschwanstein is the Romantic epitome -- or stereotype -- of a medieval European castle, and was built with that goal in mind. I heard that Disneyworld's castle was based on it.

Argos
2007-Jul-04, 05:39 PM
Neuschwanstein is the Romantic epitome -- or stereotype -- of a medieval European castle,

And it was also a big engineering challenge.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-04, 05:45 PM
Versailles or Ludwigshafen (I've probably just spelled that wrong) would also be pretty impressive engineering choices, because of the waterworks.

Argos
2007-Jul-04, 05:51 PM
Itīs also strange that big buildings, like the Petronas towers, are not included on the list. They are fully entitled to a place there. The organizers of the contest seem to have an architectural bias, I mean, theyīre evaluating architecture, not great engineering feats, like the seven wonders of the ancient world. That would explain the presence of the Sydney opera on the list, which is not a wonder to me, beautiful as it may be.

Well, thatīs why I donīt appreciate lists...

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-04, 05:54 PM
The seven wonders of the ancient world were all architectural (or in some cases arguably sculptural) feats.

Argos
2007-Jul-04, 05:57 PM
Well, except that it is hard to tell engineering from archicture in the ancient world. They´re equivalent, and they are engineering to me.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-04, 09:10 PM
Well, thatīs why I donīt appreciate lists...

I love lists, even when I don't agree with 'em. It's an easy insight into other people's minds.

Hydro
2007-Jul-04, 10:32 PM
I didn't see any space exploration rockets or telescopes in there, or dams, freighters, skyscrapers, computers, PET scan equipment, etc., (just a lot of churches and so on), so I didn't vote for any of them.

Makes you wonder.

My bold. You rang? Who mentioned Three Gorges? That place is a environmental disaster. The link below is my wonder of the world. I wonder why anyone would let me operate it day after day, year after year! :D

Anyway, for all you rat-racers, this is my getaway (http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/5295/rayburndam1jt8.jpg). :)

Maksutov
2007-Jul-05, 11:09 AM
So how are things in the Neches River Basin?

Argos
2007-Jul-05, 12:56 PM
I love lists, even when I don't agree with 'em. It's an easy insight into other people's minds.

Yeah, you may have a point here...

Gillianren
2007-Jul-05, 06:16 PM
Yeah, you may have a point here...

I am sadly, sadly addicted to VH1's list shows. I will watch Michael Ian Black and Hal Sparks love various decades as often as they'll show them to me, even though I don't love the 70s. (VH1 is one of America's great "we used to show music" channels; they're currently fond of nostalgia shows called I Love the <insert decade here>, often part two or three. They also do lists of the 100 greatest fill-in-the-blank. I've wasted many a full day on these shows.)

Nicolas
2007-Jul-05, 06:26 PM
If it makes you feel better, we also have some of "we used to show music" channels. In fact, any music channel nowadays is a WUTSM channel. The running joke here is when tuning in to one of the music channels and they play music, to shout "HEY music!!!!". And when they spot them showing a good song, you're allowed to mark it on the calendar.

Hydro
2007-Jul-06, 03:42 AM
So how are things in the Neches River Basin?

Still flowing downstream. :) Actually, it rather full due to the inordinate amount of rain in Texas this summer.

hhEb09'1
2007-Jul-07, 11:59 PM
New 'wonders of the world' named (http://www.thestar.com/News/article/233570) Jul 07, 2007 07:29 PM


Brazil's Statue of Christ Redeemer, Peru's Machu Picchu, and Mexico's Chichen Itza pyramid were chosen alongside the Great Wall of China, Jordan's Petra, the Colosseum in Rome and India's Taj Mahal.The pyraminds were grandfathered in.

Nick
2007-Jul-08, 12:29 AM
The BBC report is terrible. How about this:

"The original list of seven wonders was established more than 2,000 years ago by Greek scholars.

It included the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Colossus of Rhodes, the ancient lighthouse outside Alexandria, the great pyramid at Giza - the only survivor - and three other long-vanished edifices."

Errr... and three 'others'. What a load of crap - oh dear, oh dear.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/low/world/6281284.stm

Nick

Damien Evans
2007-Jul-08, 02:36 PM
Did anyone else notice that most of the nominations weren't, well, new?

Argos
2007-Jul-08, 04:47 PM
Only the Great wall and maybe Petra are real wonders, IMO. What goes on in the minds of these folks is unfathomable.

MG1962A
2007-Jul-08, 06:28 PM
For me - a Wonder has to be something that takes your breath away - makes you simply go wow. I can say I have experienced that three times

1/ The Sydney Opera House. I can still remember clearly the first time I saw the building after the tiles where installed

2/ Monument Rock, in Kansas USA - as some one who was with us said. Gods been playing again

3/ Eagle Nebula image taken by Hubble - often referred to as the Pillars of creation

Gillianren
2007-Jul-08, 06:31 PM
That stupid statue . . . .

No, I don't remember what I voted for long months ago. I do remember that I didn't vote for that. Probably Petra, though.

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-08, 06:44 PM
IMO, Machu Pichu, the Great Wall of China, Petra and the Taj Mahal fully deserved to win. Chichen Itz&#225; and the Colosseum maybe, but they don't seem as impressive as the others.
A shame they didn't pick Angkor Vat. :( Then again, I never voted... :o

Alan G. Archer
2007-Jul-09, 02:06 AM
My pair of modern wonders would be the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center and New York City's skirt-raising (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDEY4M9_hqs) Fuller Building.

peter eldergill
2007-Jul-09, 02:30 AM
I can't believe that statue made it. Personally, I would have chosen the Hoover Dam over the statue

Pete

NEOWatcher
2007-Jul-09, 12:53 PM
I said it before, and this discussion has solidified it. Nobody really knows what the intent of the new list is. The original one was the "must sees" of the time. Basically a travel brochure.
So; since this is a popularity contest, it's going to create a lot of controversy, thus, a lot of media coverage, which is probably the end goal anyway.

Now if the media can cover it right. I heard on TV (Fox, of course) that the Great Wall of China is the only survivor of the previous list. :rolleyes:
But then again, this morning, they said yesterday was 7/7/7, and even mentioned "Sunday".

Nicolas
2007-Jul-09, 02:47 PM
I assume they did the same in many other countries, but a local Belgian paper made a list of Belgian Wonders. They did not mean 7 Belgian things which should be considered world wonders, just the 7 best from and for belgium only. In contrary to the wonders of the world selection, they clearly stated the criteria. Which I forgot. But anyway, something about structures made by human "hands" (optionally using tools, obviously), breathtaking/inspiring/extraordinary effort or beauty, and saying something about who we are. They finished the article with "this is a list that could be expanded". Nice ending to both start and stop some discussion on it :).

One example of possible expansion:

They did not include this one (http://users.telenet.be/smart-shop/atomium03.jpg) in the list.

They did include Antwerp Central Station though, so I'm happy. :) ;)

As for the 7 wonders of the world:

Pyramids of Cheops (the whole site or just the largest one?) agreed, in fact the whole site including sphinx, or just include the whole culture as an entry. Too bad it didn't go through all these years without damage, but that's life for you and the fact that so much remains is part of the wonderous nature of the structures.

I see Petra, and certainly it's main building teh Treasury, as comparable to the Egyptian culture which I just listed, so agreed :). OK, some Egyptian buildings were larger, there's more of them too, but that doesn't make Petra any less special and beautiful. And then there's the location, which greatly adds to the breathtaking effect. And it's not just the Treasury, the whole site has very nice and impressive buildings, again comparable to Egyptian sites.

Great Wall: quite clearly a wonder of the world. The length, people, the length. :)

Christ Redeemer statue? Erm, no. Never did anything to me, nor do I find it particularly breathtaking: it doesn't seem to be particularly difficult to build it as nice or large as it is. I've seen far more beautiful statues, so what remains is that it's not too small. OK, but it's not like it's HUGE.

Machu Picchu is a wonder because of it's location: beautiful and extreme. The city itself isn't the pinnacle of its kind, it's the whole package that counts :). Maybe they used the same reasoning for Christ Redeemer, but I disagree on that. Sure the view is nice, but was it that extreme to put the statue there? No. So instead of amazing object, extreme and beautiful location, you only have nice view. Hm.. Anyway, next.

Chichen Itza pyramid. Quite impressive. But 30m high including the temple on top, built somewhere between the 11th and 13th century. Cheops main pyramid: built around 2570 BC (more than 3500 years before chichen itza), originally 146m high, until 1311 the highest building in the world (that's for nearly 4000 years!!). THAT is a wonder. I'd rather replace Chichen Itza with Angkor Wat. IMO a more impressive city.

Taj Mahal: surely a really impressive piece of art. Not exactly my style and hence not my favourite, but because it's strong point is subjective beauty and apparently many people do think it's is beatiful, I understand that it is considered a wonder.

Colosseum: 2000 years old now, biggest ancient "stadium", huge, room for 50.000 people, could open or close its roof (!), beautiful (though somewhat damaged now, no surprise given its age and, just like Cheops, the combination of natural disasters and people seeing ruins as cheap resources for building materials). OK as an entry.

As for the importance of age: IMO old isn't necessarily amazing. The tools available at a given time are though, in order to judge how much effort it cost to build something. For example, I would be happy with a Wonder that isn't even 40 years old: the Apollo 18 Saturn V. (I take apollo 18, because it still is completely existing, albeit spread over multiple locations). Originally a craft, being stored and displayed for 40 years while knowing 100&#37; sure it would never be used again has made it a monument, a sort of statue. And what a statue. Now, say 50 years in the future we build an expendable launcher of roughly saturnV dimensions and power, I wouldn't call it a wonder. By then, we'll have had SaturnV, AresV, possibly other equally large or larger launcher. So then, SaturnV being "older" IS of importance to me, because for StarunV it was an amazing, new step, while for a future launcher it's still impressive, but known and mastered technology. Just like the first huge skyscrapers are some sort of miracles, while your average, uninspired but maybe equally large modern skyscraper just is big :).

Doodler
2007-Jul-09, 07:26 PM
*yawn* Ancient garbage replacing ancient garbage.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-09, 08:18 PM
OK then, we're BAUT, the epitome of freedom. As long as the mods agree.

Time for the All New 7 wonders of the world! Structures/buildings no more than 100 years old and located below the edge of space. Hence no ISS or Hubble, sorry. And no vehicles, not even those put firmly fixed on display.

OK, let's see. I'll start with some suggestions.

* The Chrysler building. When finished in 1930, the tallest building in the world at 319m. Construction involved the top "folding out" of the rest of the tower. IMO the most beautiful skyscraper ever built. Decorated with Chrysler references both on the exterior and interior. Features a beautiful lobby in the same art deco style as the exterior. Even the elevator doors are magnificent example of art deco design.

* Viaduct de Millau. Bridge over the river Tarn in France. A very light, natural bridge that does not interfere with the landscape in which it is placed. The largest vehicle bridge in the world, featuring the tallest bridge pylon, mast and the highest road deck, second highest bridge deck. Opened in 2004

* Large Hadron Collider, Genčve. Particle accelerator placed 100m (50min, 175 max) beneath Genčve, on the French/Swiss border. Total length of the circular tunnel is 27km. The tunnel dwarfs the Genčve airport. Accelerates particles upto almost light speed (27 km circle in 88 microseconds...). To be finished next year, it will be the most powerful accelerator in the world.

OK, who continues :).

aurora
2007-Jul-09, 10:10 PM
<100 years old, human built?

Golden Gate Bridge

Sydney Opera House

Keck observatory, Mauna Kea

Mt Rushmore (although I wish they wouldn't have built it)

I suppose we'd have to pick a dam, but the large ones tend to cause lots of problems, so I'm not nominating one

That big ferris wheel thing in London (I forget what it is called)

The Chunnel

One of the really long bridges in Denmark, the one from jutland to the island that Copenhagen is on, although I have never seen the one to Sweden

Doodler
2007-Jul-09, 10:19 PM
The BBC report is terrible. How about this:

"The original list of seven wonders was established more than 2,000 years ago by Greek scholars.

It included the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Colossus of Rhodes, the ancient lighthouse outside Alexandria, the great pyramid at Giza - the only survivor - and three other long-vanished edifices."

Errr... and three 'others'. What a load of crap - oh dear, oh dear.

BBC NEWS | World | Global vote picks Seven Wonders (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/low/world/6281284.stm)

Nick

The Seven Wonders List (http://ce.eng.usf.edu/pharos/wonders/list.html)

Argos
2007-Jul-09, 10:49 PM
@ Aurora:

So, all the wonders would be in the anglosphere? :)

Nicolas
2007-Jul-09, 10:59 PM
Let's see, southern hemisphere modern wonders...

That "james bond" radio scope between the mountains? (arecibo)

The palm islands/world islands/whatever they come up with to start a tourist industry by the time they run out of oil (oh wait, that's still northern hemisphere, sorry...)

Erm, hint... what amazing things were built in the upside down hemisphere ;) the last 100 years? Oh, panama canal, I thought it was older, but it was finished less than 100 years ago. Never mind those 9°. Add to list. Opera house in Sydney? Doesn't really move me, but OK add for the many fans :).

Trebuchet
2007-Jul-09, 11:12 PM
Boeing factory in Everett, WA. About 200 yards from where I'm sitting. Not beautiful, just BIG.

peter eldergill
2007-Jul-09, 11:52 PM
How about the internet as a wonder? I think it's pretty cool that I'm chatting with you folks from all over the world! Except Nicholas (HA!)

ALso, I'd rather pick the terracotta warriors as a wonder (I met the guy who discovered the tomb)

As for the great wall of China? Been there, it was AWESOME (note allcaps for effect).

Also impressive, if you've ever been there, are the city walls in Xian. Being fom Canada, I've never seen city wall before (Quebec City doen NOT count)

L8R

Pete

Lianachan
2007-Jul-10, 12:12 AM
Probably Petra, though.

I think that's probably what I voted for too.

Always been a big Indiana Jones fan ;)

Doodler
2007-Jul-10, 12:35 AM
@ Aurora:

So, all the wonders would be in the anglosphere? :)

Aside from a dead guy flapping his wings on top of a mountain, whatchy'all got down there that's been built in the last hundred years worthy of note?

On a civic scale, Brasilia's a potential entry in terms of city planning, but in terms of actual monuments of structural acumen, the 'anglosphere' has a massive headstart. Though there are a couple contenders on my list that are nonanglo-euro-american.

I won't say it'll never happen that something awesome will arise, its just not there yet.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 07:26 AM
How about the internet as a wonder? I think it's pretty cool that I'm chatting with you folks from all over the world! Except Nicholas (HA!)

It would have hurt if you'd have typed my name correctly. HA! ;)

The internet certainly is a wonder, but it doesn't fit the criteria (criteria!! :D) I proposed for the new wonders of the world.

New entry for new wonders of the world: VAB.

Alan G. Archer
2007-Jul-10, 12:37 PM
Time for the All New 7 wonders of the world! Structures/buildings no more than 100 years old and visitable....

Well, there goes my two choices out the window.

peter eldergill
2007-Jul-10, 12:56 PM
I think that's the second time I'm misspelled your name! :doh:

Pete

Argos
2007-Jul-10, 02:01 PM
Aside from a dead guy flapping his wings on top of a mountain, whatchy'all got down there that's been built in the last hundred years worthy of note?

Itaipu dam is the biggest Hydroelectric plant in the world currently. It makes Hoover dam look like a puddle. :)

Argos
2007-Jul-10, 02:06 PM
Hey, btw, how about that arc in St Louis, MO? It looks quite impressive to me...

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 02:08 PM
Well, there goes my two choices out the window.

Which were?

edit: found. Fuller building indeed is 5 years too old. :)

While the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center isn't really visitable to ordinary people, it doesn't require ultra expensive tools and vehicles to get there, so I'm willing to let that one pass :). In fact what I intended was to exclude things like Hubble and ISS which aren't really vehicles but still miss "something" to be a world wonder. I think I could better catch that something in "located below the edge of space". I'll change it.

aurora
2007-Jul-10, 02:32 PM
@ Aurora:

So, all the wonders would be in the anglosphere? :)

My suggestions were all things that I have seen in person. I had no intention to propose that it was a final or complete list. It was just my suggestions. The previous poster was asking for suggestions, I assumed several people would respond.

Doodler
2007-Jul-10, 03:09 PM
Itaipu dam is the biggest Hydroelectric plant in the world currently. It makes Hoover dam look like a puddle. :)

*bow*

Touche` :)

hhEb09'1
2007-Jul-10, 03:18 PM
While the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center isn't really visitable to ordinary people,Groups can sign up for the unclassified tour, if you plan a few months in advance.

At least, you used to be able to, I haven't been there in twenty years. :)

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 03:45 PM
In that case, it certainly is a valid entry. :)

But just FYI, I changed my pet criteria for this little survey to

-structures or buildings made by human hands (so for example these gates (http://www.watermarkt.nl/TIW/webs/TIW006/TIW0061601.gif) still are a structure, but this (http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/fa/1956/0/) and mobile oil platforms are vehicles.)
-less than 100 years old
-situated below the edge of space
-no vehicles

So fixed oil platforms are buildings/structures rather than vehicles, in which case one could for example propose the Hibernia platform as a new world wonder.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jul-10, 05:11 PM
Based on that, I'd go with the land reclamation/seawalls in The Netherlands.

Lianachan
2007-Jul-10, 05:14 PM
Why less than 100 years old!?

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 05:29 PM
Because Doodler asked, well, cried, for NEW wonders of the world instead of ancient things. So I decided to ask for some recent entries.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 05:52 PM
Based on that, I'd go with the land reclamation/seawalls in The Netherlands.

So that would be this:

Land reclamation/storm protection:

Afsluitdijk (http://www.minbuza.nl/binaries/afbeeldingen-nieuw/foto-album/nederland-in-beelden/detailfoto-s/067.jpg) made the Zuiderzee into the Ijsselmeer. The closed part of the salt former Zuiderzee now is a freshwater lake. Originaly planned to completely fill the IJsselmeer part for polders (which the fishers did not like...), later plans changed and it remained a lake with the dike protecting against floods. The floods of 1916 helped in making the decision for building the Afsluitdijk. Length: 32km, built in what was at the time open sea.

The Deltawerken are a series of measures to protect against floods, decided after the floods of 1953. Some major elements:

Nieuwe Waterweg Stormvloedkering gates (http://www.watermarkt.nl/TIW/webs/TIW006/TIW0061601.gif) shutting off Rotterdam if tides get dangerously high and only then, because it shuts off this huge harbour foir all naval traffic. Size: think of the Eiffel tower (width of the river is 360m). Now make it 4 times as heavy and rotateable. Some people call it "the 8th world wonder" btw :).

Oosterschelde Stormvloedkering (http://www.delftgeosystems.nl/files/images_org/stormvloedkering.jpg) shutting off the Oosterschelde if tides get dangerously high. Two series of vertical steel gates with an artificial island in the middle. Used such that the nature of the tidal, salt Oosterschelde does not get disturbed. Boat passage possible. Length: 9km, of which 4km gates.

There's an awful lot more to the Deltawerken. And to other land reclamation/protection systems. All dikes, gates, locks, bridges etc directly related to the deltawerken or earlier projects in total make sure that the original and "won" land is protected against the water. The total length of "waterkeringen" in the Netherlands is 3000 km. Some of it is older than 100 years (many of the smaller, and often noadays more inland dikes), but the afsluitdijk and everything related to the Deltaplan not.

BTW there's another nice story here: as you may have noticed, 1953 is quite soon after WW2. During WW2, 90m*20m rectangular concrete (!!) boats were built for an invasion in Oostende, which never took place. In 1953, they took the boats called "caissons", sailed them to the flooded Ouwerkerk, and filled them with sand to make them sink. These sunken boats helped in repairing the broken dike. These days, you can still see them embedded as part of the dikes (http://http://www.bus-idee.nl/OuwerkerkWatersnoodmuseumLuchtfoto.jpg). But they're vehicles :).

Gillianren
2007-Jul-10, 08:36 PM
I think that's probably what I voted for too.

Always been a big Indiana Jones fan ;)

Bingo!

Let me add a vote for the Chrysler Building; it's so much prettier than the Empire State Building!

Lianachan
2007-Jul-10, 09:46 PM
Because Doodler asked, well, cried, for NEW wonders of the world instead of ancient things. So I decided to ask for some recent entries.

Still, that's discounting centuries of other contenders - which are, after all, recent in comparison to the last lot :)

Nicolas
2007-Jul-10, 10:17 PM
The Miss Universe election is also discounting 3 billion people from the very start. That's the point of criteria: limiting the contenders. New as in recent wonders of the world, our own little BAUT election, limits in age. Quite simple :).

ASEI
2007-Aug-02, 03:00 AM
Lets see...
The flag on the moon

The modern supermarket (what would any emperor of the ancient world think of commoners being able to choose from among 300 brands of ice cream? Of endless rows and columns of varieties of food, far more than what is required merely so that they can enjoy the convenience of choice? When you think about it, it's a triumph of human civilization!)

Modern computer storage - you can't even find a hard drive small enough anymore these days that it can't store every book mankind has ever written. (Assuming low-res pictures, ect).

I suppose part of the things I find wonderful about the modern world are so because they are ubiquitous and useful. They aren't just tombs for dead kings, built at tremendous expense, but things anyone can get their hands on which can improve their lives. Hmm, lets see...

The assembly line that built the model-T ford.

The Wright flyer

The telegraph

Banking! (Okay, banking sort of dates back to medieval europe. Venice and Holland and all those guys - but making credit available to borrowers and interest available to lenders was a critical economic ability, providing much needed funding for capital expansion)

Nicolas
2007-Aug-02, 12:15 PM
Modern computer storage - you can't even find a hard drive small enough anymore these days that it can't store every book mankind has ever written. (Assuming low-res pictures, ect).

Sure about that?

publiusr
2007-Aug-10, 10:12 PM
My List:

American Electrical-telecom grid
VAB/Baikonur (Saturn V moonshot/Automated Buran flight)
Itaipu/Three Gorges/TVA
Troll Platform
burj Dubai/al Burj
Large Hadron/CERN
OWL telescope

sarongsong
2009-Jan-08, 02:47 AM
I'd forgotten all about that - I voted ages and ages ago....It's the "Energizer-Bunny" of contests!
January 7, 2009
...The Swiss-based nonprofit foundation collected 441 nominations over the Internet since it opened the selection process in 2007...then chose the top vote-getter from each country, making a list of 222 sites. The overall list rose to 261 with the inclusion of sites shared by two or more countries...Votes can be cast until July 7...
North County Times (http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2009/01/06/backpage/z8b882bb03507377a88257536007e1b28.txt)

Salty
2009-Jan-08, 06:28 AM
Although the Itaipu dam is bigger and newer, I still nominate Hoover Dam as among the first really big dams. It was a magnificent project, for its time.

ParaDoctor
2009-Jan-08, 07:25 AM
The modern supermarket (what would any emperor of the ancient world think of commoners being able to choose from among 300 brands of ice cream? Of endless rows and columns of varieties of food, far more than what is required merely so that they can enjoy the convenience of choice? When you think about it, it's a triumph of human civilization!)Well put. :) We should not forget, though, that this is not yet true for the majority of the world population, just a significant minority.


Modern computer storage - you can't even find a hard drive small enough anymore these days that it can't store every book mankind has ever written. (Assuming low-res pictures, ect).You underestimate the power of the market and the amount of stuff produced (http://www2.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info/print.html). The smallest drive I found was a 2 GB SSD. The smallest mechanical disk is 20 GB, the biggest 1.5 TB. Using their estimate of 64 TB, you need at least 42 HDDs for storing all books ever written. Which is a pretty amazing coincidence. :lol:

Anyway, much more impressive than the storage medium is the content. Any sizable university library has on-site the core of almost the entire knowledge of mankind. To me, that is a greater accomplishment than the supermarket.

mugaliens
2009-Jan-09, 09:43 PM
Why isn't Hogwarts on the list? I think that's quite impressive!

sarongsong
2009-Jan-09, 09:56 PM
From the OP link:
...the New7Wonders of Nature...

danscope
2009-Jan-10, 02:27 AM
They should consider the stonework of Sacsayhuaman. The people that built
this were in a class by themselves and have never been equaled.
Should be a good pick.
Best regards, Dan

Cougar
2009-Jan-10, 03:33 AM
The Old World had 7 wonders. Apparently our world has 777.

Chuck
2009-Jan-10, 04:07 PM
I nominate the cosmetics industry. Billions of dollars are being taken in by selling something that nobody needs. It's incredible.

Disinfo Agent
2009-Jan-10, 04:13 PM
But hardly wonderful.

mugaliens
2009-Jan-10, 04:47 PM
Speaking of making wonders contemporary, here's one (http://www.bautforum.com/astronomy/83396-brightest-moon-2009-tonight-media-warning-high-bandwidth-required.html#post1406893)that's good only for tonight for all of 2009. An oldie, but a goodie.

sarongsong
2009-Jan-10, 06:52 PM
ToSeeked (http://www.bautforum.com/1403196-post2245.html) :)

mugaliens
2009-Jan-12, 12:58 AM
From the OP link:

Ah. The natural world. As opposed to the wizarding world.

Makes sense...

Whirlpool
2009-Jan-12, 04:42 AM
I voted our own Subterranean Underground River (http://www.new7wonders.com/nature/en/nominees/asia/c/PuertoPrincesa/)at Puerto Princesa, Palawan.