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Palomar
2007-Jul-03, 02:32 PM
Endeavour moves to the VAB for Aug. 7 launch
In preparation for its first spaceflight in nearly five years, space shuttle Endeavour was transported from its hangar to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center Monday morning. The shuttle will be attached to its fuel tank and booster rockets inside the 52-story VAB. Rollout to pad 39A is scheduled for next week. Endeavour is targeted for launch to the space station August 7 at about 7 p.m. EDT.

I thought it was spelled the American way: ENDEAVOR. No "U". Have seen this for a 2nd day in a row.

That quote is from spaceflightnow.com, which I believe is a US site.

If not, if we spell OUR vehicle "Endeavor," everyone else should also spell it that way. Sorry, but it's also a nitpick that Brits/Canadians/Aussies often spell "Nasa" instead of NASA (an acronym).

If it originated in America, if we own it, spell it our way!

I'm going to check the NASA site to see which is the correct spelling for Endeavor [despite thinking I knew all this time previously]; I don't recall ever seeing a "u" in it before now, but maybe I forgot. This has got me wondering!

--just checked Google, both Web and Images. Endeavor and Endeavour are each used as spelling for that Shuttle, including at web pages connected to NASA. :rolleyes:

Nicolas
2007-Jul-03, 02:37 PM
After what ship was that shuttle named, from what country did that ship originate and how was its name written? :)

If you decide to name your US shuttle after a British ship having a name in British spelling, you end up with a US ship having a name in British spelling. Logical. If I call my home antenna after La Tour Eiffel, it will be called La Tour Eiffel even though I don't speak French. Logical.

One more thing to end the discussion on how it should officially be written:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a5/Shuttle_Endeavour_angedockt_an_der_ISS.jpg/800px-Shuttle_Endeavour_angedockt_an_der_ISS.jpg

As for NASA, it's an acronym and should ineed be written in all caps. Now that I think about it, maybe it's because NASA is in all caps that hoax theorists love it :).

CJSF
2007-Jul-03, 02:37 PM
It's Endeavour, because it's named after the British ship HMS Bark Endeavour, captained by James Cook. That is how it's spelled on the orbiter's exterior and all the official NASA information.

CJSF

Palomar
2007-Jul-03, 03:10 PM
After what ship was that shuttle named, from what country did that ship originate and how was its name written? :)

If you decide to name your US shuttle after a British ship having a name in British spelling, you end up with a US ship having a name in British spelling.

Well, I didn't know that. Haven't refreshed my memory of the Shuttle program/history in a long time (I'm not a fan of it), didn't know it was named after the British ship.

I'm suddenly seeing this Shuttle spelled two different ways; it drew this question.

Thanks.

Palomar
2007-Jul-03, 03:11 PM
I do still wish, however, that Brits (and others) would use "NASA." It is an acronym. It's not "Nasa."

They might have invented the language; don't begrudge us for having improved it. :D

SeanF
2007-Jul-03, 03:30 PM
I do still wish, however, that Brits (and others) would use "NASA." It is an acronym. It's not "Nasa."
Radar and scuba are both acronyms, too, but they're not generally written in all capitals.

Don't get me wrong, I agree it should be "NASA" rather than "Nasa." But "it's an acronym" isn't a reason why.

Dave J
2007-Jul-03, 03:53 PM
Discovery was also named after a British ship, though apparently there were "several" Discoverys. I think the two main trips of note were the Arctic expedition and an extensive survey voyage to the Pacific Northwest.

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-03, 04:18 PM
As for NASA, it's an acronym and should ineed be written in all caps.Then again, so are "laser" and "radar", and you don't write those in all caps...

P.S. SeanF beat me to it. :doh:

Eta C
2007-Jul-03, 04:25 PM
Then again, so are "laser" and "radar", and you don't write those in all caps...

P.S. SeanF beat me to it. :doh:

At one time they were written in all caps, as was sonar or as the British used to call it asdic. As time goes on languages evolve and as an acronym enters the language as a word, the capitalization vanishes. For other military examples there's snafu and fubar which one would not expect to see in all caps.

Jim
2007-Jul-03, 04:45 PM
Nicolas, that picture's a fake. Where are the stars?

Nicolas
2007-Jul-03, 04:48 PM
Then again, so are "laser" and "radar", and you don't write those in all caps...

P.S. SeanF beat me to it. :doh:

You're right, it's a name written as NASA originally, so you should write it like that. Just like LaTeX. 'it's an acronym' indeed is not the reason. 'someone decided to write the acronym name all caps' is the reason :). NASA still is a name, where laser and radar became words. So I think we should stick to the original spelling, NASA.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-03, 04:49 PM
Nicolas, that picture's a fake. Where are the stars?

There are no stars because the shuttle is on the dayside of the Universe. Obviously the sky is black because it's flying above the atmosphere, but what you're looking at is the same starless side of the Universe we see during the day.





Happy now? :D

01101001
2007-Jul-03, 06:39 PM
I do still wish, however, that Brits (and others) would use "NASA." It is an acronym. It's not "Nasa."

British English. For instance, the Guardian style guide (http://www.guardian.co.uk/styleguide/page/0,,184844,00.html):


acronyms
take initial cap: Aids, Isa, Mori, Nato

Once in a while someone tries to change that and fails. It might be easier on you if you just get used to it.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-03, 09:26 PM
That looks wrong to me. Is Guardian style universal throughout the country?

01101001
2007-Jul-03, 10:16 PM
That looks wrong to me. Is Guardian style universal throughout the country?

Not universal. I think there are outposts that do it American-style.

answers.com: abbreviations (http://www.answers.com/topic/abbreviation)


In Britain
[...]

Acronyms are often referred to with only the first letter of the abbreviation capitalised. For instance, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation can be abbreviated as "Nato" or "NATO", and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome as "Sars" or "SARS" (compare with "laser" which has made the full transition to an English word and is rarely capitalised at all).
Initialisms are always written in capitals; for example the "British Broadcasting Corporation" is abbreviated to "BBC", never "Bbc". An initialism is similar to acronym but is not pronounced as a word.

speedfreek
2007-Jul-03, 10:44 PM
Maybe it should be spelt out, like the BBC then..

The N A S A ;)

Gillianren
2007-Jul-04, 04:52 AM
Maybe it should be spelt out, like the BBC then..

The N A S A ;)

The difference between the two is that "NASA" can be said as a word; "BBC" cannot. See the other examples.

Jens
2007-Jul-04, 05:08 AM
If it originated in America, if we own it, spell it our way!



I hope you mean that as a joke. But I have a feeling perhaps you didn't.

I hope you'll stop using poor transliterations like Munich, Venice, and Brittany, for example.

The fact is, people can spell things however they please. If an American newspaper wants to use the Ministry of Defense to describe the UK ministry, I don't see any problem with that either.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-04, 09:43 AM
Here's the authoritative word on the OP. (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/resources/orbiters/endeavour.html)

Although now, due to some within NASA ignoring the concerns of "foamologists", it's a three orbiter fleet.

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-04, 01:50 PM
The difference between the two is that "NASA" can be said as a word; "BBC" cannot.I can say it: 'Bebecee'... ;)

grant hutchison
2007-Jul-04, 02:04 PM
That looks wrong to me. Is Guardian style universal throughout the country?It has to be said that using the Guardian as a touchstone for spelling and punctuation is probably not recommended. They make such a hash of both that the paper has long been ironically known as the Grauniad. :)

Grant Hutchison

Gillianren
2007-Jul-04, 05:54 PM
It has to be said that using the Guardian as a touchstone for spelling and punctuation is probably not recommended. They make such a hash of both that the paper has long been ironically known as the Grauniad. :)

Ah, yes. I'm familiar with that sort of thing.

SeanF
2007-Jul-13, 03:01 PM
Referring back to the OP, I present this article (http://www.local6.com/news/13675075/detail.html).


When the shuttle rolled out from the Vehicle Assembly Building Wednesday, a giant "Go Endeavour" sign was put on a fence in front of the craft.

However, one item was missing from the sign: the "u" in Endeavour.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-13, 03:26 PM
Referring back to the OP, I present this article (http://www.local6.com/news/13675075/detail.html).
When the shuttle rolled out from the Vehicle Assembly Building Wednesday, a giant "Go Endeavour" sign was put on a fence in front of the craft.

However, one item was missing from the sign: the "u" in Endeavour.Well, maybe there's no "u" in Endeavour, but there's definitely an "our"!

mike alexander
2007-Jul-13, 09:03 PM
I do smell an Amazing Untrue Fact brewing around here...

I think we would be better off dropping the 'a' and having 'Endevour'.

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jul-13, 09:13 PM
That would seriously risk being mispronounced.

mike alexander
2007-Jul-13, 09:39 PM
Excatly.

So to Speake.