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Jens
2007-Jul-05, 02:34 AM
I wonder what people think of this (particularly Gillianren). I am editing a document, and person used the term "most unforgettable." My reaction to that is, I hate it. Or rather, I find it illogical. It's like being dead or pregnant, in my view. If something is unforgettable, then it can't be forgotten, and there can't be any "more" or "less". You could say "easier to forget" or "harder to forget," I think.

But I googled it, and it seems quite common as a phrase. I'm wondering, am I the only one to be bothered by this?

sarongsong
2007-Jul-05, 02:44 AM
My money's on least unforgettable :)
(and why two t's?)

Amber Robot
2007-Jul-05, 03:14 AM
Is it kind of like "more unique"?

Jeff Root
2007-Jul-05, 03:17 AM
I doubt that you're the only one bothered by it, but I think there
isn't much reason to be bothered by it. Just ignore it. It won't
go away, but it won't bite, either.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-05, 03:52 PM
Hey, I once heard a speech made by a coach to his team upon his retirement from coaching football.

He said, "Thanks for all the memorable memories!"

:D

CJSF
2007-Jul-05, 04:09 PM
I'm not bothered by it. In my opinion, since forgettable merely means "able to be forgotten," not that it IS or WILL be forgotten, if something is most unforgettable, it just means it has the highest chance of not being forgotten.

CJSF

Fazor
2007-Jul-05, 04:11 PM
Yeah, personally instead of saying "Most unforgetable" I'd use "most memorable", but I *think* it's more a matter of personal preference than it being incorrect (I'll let Gillian make the final judgment ;)).

CJSF
2007-Jul-05, 04:50 PM
I thought about this some more. I would say "most unforgettable" instead of "most memorable" or "least forgettable" depending on context and where I wanted to stress the meaning. All are valid, in my opinion.

CJSF

Gillianren
2007-Jul-05, 06:06 PM
I'd go with "most memorable," because I like the sound better; neither is, in my opinion at least, actually wrong. It is possible, after all, to forget things in bits; the most memorable or most unforgettable thing is the thing you are least likely to lose bits of.

But if you want to watch my best friend's head explode, refer in her presence to something as "most unique."

Argos
2007-Jul-05, 06:13 PM
I wonder what people think of this (particularly Gillianren). I am editing a document, and person used the term "most unforgettable." My reaction to that is, I hate it. Or rather, I find it illogical. It's like being dead or pregnant, in my view. If something is unforgettable, then it can't be forgotten, and there can't be any "more" or "less". You could say "easier to forget" or "harder to forget," I think.

But I googled it, and it seems quite common as a phrase. I'm wondering, am I the only one to be bothered by this?

Yeah, not the only one. This kind of oxymoronic expression does exist in all languages...

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-05, 08:43 PM
But if you want to watch my best friend's head explode, refer in her presence to something as "most unique."

:lol:

Yeah, that'd be me, too. "Unique" is a linguistic Boolean - something either is or isn't unique, it (uniqueness) cannot be possessed in degrees.

Anyway, I also can't find any technical objection to "most unforgettable", but from a stylistic perspective, it sets my teeth on edge! "Most memorable" isn't necessarily any better grammatically, but it is far better prose.

Noclevername
2007-Jul-05, 09:14 PM
One could always use a simile; "It sticks in your mind like gum in the hair."

On second thought, forget it.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-06, 05:08 PM
One could always use a simile; "It sticks in your mind like gum in the hair."

Ew.


On second thought, forget it.
Rest assured, I shall do my utmost.