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suntrack2
2007-Jul-07, 10:21 AM
I won't like to do a ditto copy of other book, but I would like to write a book on any of the following topic.

a. evolution of feather
b. the blue moon
c. Interiors of sun

Please guide me accordingly, about book writing starting tips etc,because before this I have never tried to write a book, is all books are required to get a ISBN number, and how the book can be register there, lot of questions are there in my mind.

would you like to share any ideas!

is there a ready made software to write book which will enable to check out the mistakes and gramer and composition!

WaxRubiks
2007-Jul-07, 10:34 AM
write the book in MSword
spell check it.
find a publisher who will then have it proof read
and then it will be published and get its ISBN.

simple!

Gillianren
2007-Jul-07, 05:44 PM
The first thing to remember about writing a book is that you must be interested in the thing you're writing about. Writing just because people online have suggested one of your topics isn't enough; if I tried that, I'd get bored pretty quickly and move on to something else. Write about what you love. Write about what you know. And, if I may suggest, either write in your native language or work really hard on improving your English before trying to write in it.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jul-07, 06:47 PM
I would second Gillian's point about writing it in your own language.

If you want to write in English, you have to really know English.

I don't say this to be insulting. I say it because editors and publishers have a great many manuscripts sent to them, and they have to decide which ones are worth publishing. There is a lot of pressure on them, and not much time. So, rather than read every single submission from start to finish, they will look for excuses to reject manuscripts.

Sometimes the editor or publisher will flick through a few pages to check if the author is using the correct form of "its" or "it's", and might reject the manuscript for that reason.

Tog
2007-Jul-10, 07:21 AM
I would second Gillian's point about writing it in your own language.

If you want to write in English, you have to really know English.

I don't say this to be insulting. I say it because editors and publishers have a great many manuscripts sent to them, and they have to decide which ones are worth publishing. There is a lot of pressure on them, and not much time. So, rather than read every single submission from start to finish, they will look for excuses to reject manuscripts.

Sometimes the editor or publisher will flick through a few pages to check if the author is using the correct form of "its" or "it's", and might reject the manuscript for that reason.

A book I have about writing says basically the same thing, but there is a story from an editor where he said that most of the time he decides after the first paragraph. If he has no interest in moving on to the second, the book goes to the reject pile straight away.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jul-11, 06:35 PM
A book I have about writing says basically the same thing, but there is a story from an editor where he said that most of the time he decides after the first paragraph. If he has no interest in moving on to the second, the book goes to the reject pile straight away.

Yes, I've heard that. I believe the editor is William F. Nolan, co-author of Logan's Run.

suntrack2
2007-Jul-12, 12:12 PM
thanks for sharing the remarks here, I respect all of you in advising the material facts of writing. And as you said that writing in brief is much good in the own language, that's a really good advice, as my native language is marathi, and sometime it is very difficult to express in english ditto. Hence I am asking that is there any software which can translate the marathi into english directly alongwith the spell checks etc! Because if I am writing in pure engish the editor or publisher will throw away my script, by quoting a "great head-ache." :) is it not! There is a need to acquire a "enterpreter software which can solve the debacle of poor english", few people even the juniors too are very lavishly speaks and write the engish with a clean appearance and expressions and impression. So language may be one barrier, second barrier may come about through knowledge as the same is inadiquate with me, so will that book neat and good one, no not, hence I have to improve, for improvements time is require and if the time is require means I can loose the chance to write precisely.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-12, 06:45 PM
Interpreter software is awful. If anything, your English may be better.

mr obvious
2007-Jul-14, 02:05 AM
Have you considered writing the book in Marathi?

Besides a topic, have you thought about your potential readers (e.g., children, laypersons, technical people)?

Spacemad
2007-Aug-07, 09:43 AM
Interpreter software is awful. If anything, your English may be better.

Hi, Suntrack, I think Gillianren is right, translation software IS, unfortunately, terrible. I speak Spanish fluently, after living in the country for more than 20 years, but on the odd occasion, more out of curiosity & laziness than anything else, I've translated an article from English to Spanish using a couple of the translation services available on the internet. I've later had to correct them & it cost me almost as much time as if I'd translated them myself directly!

Earlier Gillianren posted that you must be INTERESTED in what you would like to write about. I think that's probably one of the best pieces of advice you can be given by anyone. If you are not REALLY interested you will write a poor book that will probably never get published. You will also be dissatisfied with your book & that may put you off ever writing again.

Write a book by all means but perhaps it would better if you wrote it in your own language. If it is going to be non-fiction your fellow country folk will get more benefit from it than if you were to write it in English. There are plenty of native English speakers writing books - more so than probably in any other language!

Have you thought about possibly translating FROM English into your language? Perhaps you could do more for your own people by translating English works than writing a book yourself in English.

It's no dishonour to translate another person's work, but before you publish it you must make sure you have all the correct permissions. I wrote to an English magazine, when I was living in Spain, asking them for permission to translate, & publish, articles from their magazine into Spanish. I got a nice reply giving me permission to do so as long as I mentioned the original source.

Many of Man's best works have been translated into any number of languages & mankind has benefited as a whole from their work!

So you might like to consider that as an option when thinking about writing a book.

Good luck to you, Sunil.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Aug-07, 11:56 AM
Very nice post, Spacemad.


Earlier Gillianren posted that you must be INTERESTED in what you would like to write about. I think that's probably one of the best pieces of advice you can be given by anyone. If you are not REALLY interested you will write a poor book that will probably never get published. You will also be dissatisfied with your book & that may put you off ever writing again.

I read this and thought about some authors who write on a diverse range of topics. Asimov, for instance, writing about many different branches of science, cookery, theology, history... oh, and science fiction, fantasy and mystery. It made me appreciate him anew to think he could have been that interested!

djellison
2007-Aug-10, 07:43 AM
I'd highly recommend this:
http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Handbook-2007/dp/1405049375/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-5859721-9662818?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186731761&sr=8-1

Doug

Hilton Ratcliffe
2007-Aug-25, 09:30 AM
I have recently published a book titled "The Virtue of Heresy - Confessions of a Dissident Astronomer". It's about the bad science (mostly) that we are taught to use to try to explain what we see. It covers all three of Suntrack2's proposed topics - very lightly in two cases, and fairly comprehensively in the third.

Publishing a book, especially in the popular science genre, and even more especially one that calls some of the heroes of cosmology half-blind sissies, is a testing task, one that will take your fortitude and tenacity to the brink of collapse.

I wish you the very best of luck. As others have stated here, if you have a passion for it, do it, otherwise don't.

With kind regards
Hilton Ratcliffe
Astronomical Society of Southern Africa
Alternative Cosmology Group

man on the moon
2007-Dec-15, 11:39 PM
And as you said that writing in brief is much good in the own language, that's a really good advice, as my native language is marathi, and sometime it is very difficult to express in english ditto. Hence I am asking that is there any software which can translate the marathi into english directly alongwith the spell checks etc! Because if I am writing in pure engish the editor or publisher will throw away my script, by quoting a "great head-ache." :) is it not!

From a couple other posts it sounds like you may want to write in your marathi. That's great!

If english is your choice though, I would advise skipping the translator software and go for a live person. Either find an english/marathi translator, or a native english speaker willing to work with you. You may find a student studying your language, for example, and the two of you could collaborate on the book. In the meanwhile you would both go leaps and bounds beyond what a class can teach you about a language!

Another note on english is many books have already been written on the subjects you mentioned--check that you are not going to be more "white noise" before you put so much effort into a piece of literature. Or translate one of those aforementioned books to marathi! I think that has been mentioned as well.

Tricky Woo
2008-Feb-18, 12:32 AM
An ex-girlfriend once commented that everyone who thinks they have a decent novel in them should read John Irving - and if they reckon they can match it, then proceed. If not? Take up painting... or write an autobiography.

I can't paint for toffee, so that leaves me...

But I'd also say that every successful book has at least a touch of entertainment about it. The libraries are full of unread books written in the driest and most correct language. Lighten yours up a little.

TW

Occam
2008-Feb-18, 06:35 AM
An ex-girlfriend once commented that everyone who thinks they have a decent novel in them should read John Irving - and if they reckon they can match it, then proceed. If not? Take up painting... or write an autobiography.

I can't paint for toffee, so that leaves me...

But I'd also say that every successful book has at least a touch of entertainment about it. The libraries are full of unread books written in the driest and most correct language. Lighten yours up a little.

TW
In case no-one has said it, welcome to BAUT Tricky Woo. Irving notwithstanding, you are clearly also a student of Herriot :lol:
(edit - or Canadian Indie Rock)

Paul Beardsley
2008-Feb-18, 04:01 PM
An ex-girlfriend once commented that everyone who thinks they have a decent novel in them should read John Irving - and if they reckon they can match it, then proceed. If not? Take up painting... or write an autobiography.

I can't paint for toffee, so that leaves me...

But I'd also say that every successful book has at least a touch of entertainment about it. The libraries are full of unread books written in the driest and most correct language. Lighten yours up a little.

TW

Interesting thoughts there, TW.

Despite having been given a copy of A Prayer for Owen Meaney, I haven't read any John Irving. Perhaps I will. However, even if JI blows my socks off, I doubt I would want to limit my reading to just that one author. I think I am like most readers in that occasionally I want something a bit highbrow, occasionally I want something trashy, and various degrees in between.

In short, I agree with you about "at least a touch of entertainment". I'm currently working on my second novel (which has a long way to go before I submit it) and I do hope that if I get it published, readers will find it suspenseful, scary and moving. If it keeps them turning the pages to find out what happens next, and if it leaves them satisfied yet wanting more, I will have achieved what I set out to do. I have no idea if that is what counts as a "decent" novel!

Gillianren
2008-Feb-18, 10:17 PM
I have pretty catholic (with a small "c," naturally) tastes, but the only Irving I've read was The Hotel New Hampshire, and I wasn't overly impressed. I do, however, agree that you needn't set your standards all that high before you decide to write something. Writing for publication is one thing, but I've written a lot that isn't great. Heck, even my movie reviews, which are online for all to see, are things that generally take me half an hour tops to write; every once in a while, when I'm reading back over them, I have to go fix typos. Heck, I own the complete set of Quantum Leap novels, and some of those are very bad.

Entertainment is important, yes. I read a lot of nonfiction, too, but I've stopped reading a fair amount because of dryness of style.

Fazor
2008-Feb-19, 03:18 PM
Heck, I own the complete set of Quantum Leap novels, and some of those are very bad.

After mentioning them in another thread, I felt compelled to go re-read a childhood favorite, the Redwall series by Brian Jacques. I have to say, as fond of them as my memories were, it's not the most beautiful prose I've ever read. But the stories are okay, and still keep me turning the pages.

The Supreme Canuck
2008-Feb-21, 11:21 PM
Oh, yeah. I did the same over the Christmas holiday last year. Well, I tried. It's probably best not to ruin Redwall for myself like that.

m74z00219
2009-Sep-26, 07:36 PM
If I may recommend a tool for writing novels, I would recommend "ywriter". It's perfect for organizing large blocks of text and it is free.

http://www.spacejock.com/yWriter.html

It runs on windows, linux, and, if you're savvy enough, mac os.

Good luck!
M74

eburacum45
2009-Oct-04, 07:01 PM
Does 'ywriter' convert text into .pdf form, or does it allow that conversion easily? For the next OA book, I'm thinking that it might save editing time if we convert the text into .pdf format before sending it off to the publishers. Easier to convert into an e-book format too, no doubt.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Oct-04, 09:06 PM
Unless it's a direct to print, vanity press type of thing, you can be rather sure the publisher would hate you for using .pdf.

What they're likely to want is a non-formatted text-only format that can be easily edited to fix your spelling and grammar mistakes, and can be broken up in pages based on their decisions on fonts and page sizes.
Possibly one with functional rather than layout based markup.

They definitely don't want you to force the layout decisions, especially for something that might be published in different layouts.

Converting from .pdf is a hellish nightmare compared to a clean textbased markup format.

Tobin Dax
2009-Oct-04, 10:02 PM
eburacum, the best format to deliver something in sounds like a question you should ask your publisher. While your intentions may be good, you could end up making much more work for them.

eburacum45
2009-Oct-04, 10:29 PM
It would be nice to have more control over layout and so on, but perhaps I'll have to take advice on this one.

John Jaksich
2009-Oct-07, 01:21 PM
I am trying to be helpful here-- obviously so-- I attempted to learn LaTeX and that may be an option -- the font and control afforded to the writer seem superior to almost anything that I have experienced.

m74z00219
2009-Oct-18, 03:03 AM
I am trying to be helpful here-- obviously so-- I attempted to learn LaTeX and that may be an option -- the font and control afforded to the writer seem superior to almost anything that I have experienced.

I agree with you there, but it's not kind of annoying to use for something that doesn't incorporate figures, equations, and stuff.

M74

caerdydd
2011-May-19, 11:24 AM
I won't like to do a ditto copy of other book, but I would like to write a book on any of the following topic.

a. evolution of feather
b. the blue moon
c. Interiors of sun

Please guide me accordingly, about book writing starting tips etc,because before this I have never tried to write a book, is all books are required to get a ISBN number, and how the book can be register there, lot of questions are there in my mind.

would you like to share any ideas!

is there a ready made software to write book which will enable to check out the mistakes and gramer and composition!


Hi suntrack2,

General authoring advice (in my opinion).

Enjoy the process.

Try to avoid writing from a personal reactionary agenda (avoid ‘chippiness’ however well disguised).

Enjoy the freedom that composition provides.

Be honest with yourself and your readership, you are and author, not a salesman.

Highlight all assumptions.

When you fall into the loop that you are continually editing/re-editing and deleting ... have the confidence to draw that line in the sand and say "that will do".

Why are you writing? For yourself? Or to gain intellectual acceptance? True authorship is not a badge of honour to wave (however modestly) in front of your peers. It is to live thrive and create a world within your mind where every choice is yours. You define your own limits by your choice of topic.

Regarding your question: "is there ready made software to write book which will enable to check out the mistakes and gramer and composition?" This 'software' is your neuroplastic brain, use it to the best of your ability.

Lastly, if you are agonising about what to include, you are not yet ready, if however you are agonising about what to leave out, because everything seems too important, then you have the gift.

Regards,

C