PDA

View Full Version : Robotic policemen



Paracelsus
2007-Jul-08, 08:42 PM
Via 'New Scientist': http://www.newscientisttech.com/article/dn12207-armed-autonomous-robots-cause-concern.html


A MOVE to arm police robots with stun guns has been condemned by weapons researchers.

On 28 June, Taser International of Arizona announced plans to equip robots with stun guns.

Remember how well that worked out in 'Robocop'?? The prospect of having armed robots patrolling the streets freaks me out. I don't like this idea at all. :eek:

sarongsong
2007-Jul-08, 09:03 PM
What happens when they encounter armed criminal robots?

Noclevername
2007-Jul-08, 09:07 PM
Since police "robots" are actually radio-controlled waldoes anyway, it's not like the taserbot would be rolling around the streets going *bleep* "make-my-day-punk" *bleep*

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-08, 09:09 PM
These did not say 'radio-controlled'. We'll see. The article did not give very many details.

Jeff Root
2007-Jul-08, 11:40 PM
Paracelsus,
If they weren't radio-controlled, how would they work?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Alan G. Archer
2007-Jul-09, 01:26 AM
If they weren't radio-controlled, how would they work?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

AI bot code from Unreal Tournament 2004, perhaps?

The robots would need a remote shutdown feature when they go beyond the ownage stage.

Alan G. Archer
2007-Jul-09, 01:28 AM
What happens when they encounter armed criminal robots?

Transform and roll out!

01101001
2007-Jul-09, 02:02 AM
These did not say 'radio-controlled'. We'll see. The article did not give very many details.

If NewScientist didn't say radio-controlled, it was probably NewScientist being NewScientist -- proud publisher of the ridiculous-puddles-on-martian-crater-walls claim. (No, it's not yet time to let that go. They haven't suffered enough.) May I suggest trying other more respectable journals for science news?

More from a certain horse's mouth:

iRobot press release: iRobot and TASER Team to Deliver New Robot Capabilities for Military, Law Enforcement (http://www.irobot.com/sp.cfm?pageid=86&id=344&referrer=28)


iRobot Corp. (NASDAQ: IRBT) today announced a strategic alliance with TASER International, Inc. to develop new robots that can remotely engage, incapacitate and control dangerous suspects with integrated TASER electronic control devices. Built on iRobot's combat-proven PackBot® robot platforms, the new TASER-equipped robots will add a new ability to control dangerous suspects while keeping personnel, the suspect and bystanders out of harm's way.
[...]
The PackBot Explorer is a rugged and lightweight robot that can be hand-carried and deployed by a single operator.

iRobot PackBot Explorer overview (http://www.irobot.com/sp.cfm?pageid=139)

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-09, 08:28 AM
If NewScientist didn't say radio-controlled, it was probably NewScientist being NewScientist -- proud publisher of the ridiculous-puddles-on-martian-crater-walls claim. (No, it's not yet time to let that go. They haven't suffered enough.) May I suggest trying other more respectable journals for science news?

Ooooh, I wasn't aware of that!! And here I was, disparaging 'SciAm'....

I've subscribed to 'Science' and can access their articles online; you'll be seeing a lot more of their stuff from me in future.

Thanks for the tip, 01101001! :)

Ronald Brak
2007-Jul-09, 09:03 AM
Call me crazy, but why not arm the robots with smelly yellow spray paint instead of darts that can jab into your eyeball and send an electric charge down your optic nerve? That way the suspect will be very visible, easy to track visual trails (yellow paint) and easy to track by smell using either human noses, dog noses or cut down versions of chemical sniffing bomb detectors. More work for laundrys, less work for lawers and doctors that way.

Ilya
2007-Jul-09, 12:49 PM
Call me crazy, but why not arm the robots with smelly yellow spray paint instead of darts that can jab into your eyeball and send an electric charge down your optic nerve? That way the suspect will be very visible, easy to track visual trails (yellow paint) and easy to track by smell using either human noses, dog noses or cut down versions of chemical sniffing bomb detectors. More work for laundrys, less work for lawers and doctors that way.

Because more often than not, the suspect needs to be immobilized at once, rather than "tagged" for someone else to immobilize him later.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jul-09, 12:55 PM
Because more often than not, the suspect needs to be immobilized at once, rather than "tagged" for someone else to immobilize him later.

That's some pretty advanced cognitive processing going on there, working out who needs to be immobilized and who doesn't. Call me a pessermist but being on par with a human in that regard is over a decade away.

01101001
2007-Jul-09, 01:05 PM
That's some pretty advanced cognitive processing going on there, working out who needs to be immobilized and who doesn't.

Are you talking about the actual human-operated iRobot with Taser announced, or the sensationalistic Taser-equipped autonomous fantasy robot described by fiction-reporter NewScientist?

Ronald Brak
2007-Jul-09, 01:25 PM
Are you talking about the actual human-operated iRobot with Taser announced, or the sensationalistic Taser-equipped autonomous fantasy robot described by fiction-reporter NewScientist?

I have no idea what I'm talking about. But personally I tend not to think of remotely controlled devices as robots. I generally think of them as remotely controlled devices. If it's like a remote operated grabby thing I call it a waldo.

Swift
2007-Jul-09, 03:15 PM
I, for one, welcome our new Robotic Policemen Overlords.

JustAFriend
2007-Jul-10, 03:35 PM
They won't be effective...

Everyone knows their root password will be "Klatu berada nicto".....

;-))

01101001
2007-Jul-10, 03:49 PM
I have no idea what I'm talking about. But personally I tend not to think of remotely controlled devices as robots. I generally think of them as remotely controlled devices. If it's like a remote operated grabby thing I call it a waldo.

So the actual news report -- not the fictional one from NewScientist -- appears to be about remotely controlled devices (even if their manufacturer refers to them as robots), so "pretty advanced cognitive processing going on there, working out who needs to be immobilized and who doesn't" would be done by a human, just like the good ol' days.