PDA

View Full Version : escaped snake please help



MechTech
2007-Jul-13, 04:27 PM
My sons baby African garden snake escaped from his terrarium last night :doh:. I have looked everywhere but considering how small he is i cannot find him. I am looking for suggestions on luring him out of hiding. I am going to try placing his sleeping cave and a pinkie on the floor to see if he will eat and then hide in the cave.

Anyone have any suggestions ?

thanks in advance

Moose
2007-Jul-13, 04:34 PM
That's as good an idea as any I'd come up with, I'm afraid.

There are probably snake-enthusiast forums out there somewhere, filled with people with one heck-of-a-lot more experience thinking like snakes than we'd likely have.

Drawing on what very little I know about snakes, it is likely to be attracted to warm spots. Under or behind the fridge is one place I'd check. If you have a humidifier or dehumidifier, that's another possibility.

MechTech
2007-Jul-13, 04:46 PM
Thanks I didnt think of that. He is going to kill me when he gets home and finds it gone.

Moose
2007-Jul-13, 04:50 PM
You might try inside the couch or the box spring of any beds as well. I've heard of pythons snuggling up in places like that. Laundry hampers, linen closets if there's any sort of room. Kittens are notorious for that as well. Enclosed closets. That sort of place.

Depending on how small the critter is and if there are gaps anywhere, you might even try inside the computer. It's possible for a very small snake to get in through a cooling vent. Most mini-towers would be safe enough for a small snake even while operating, so long as it's off when it enters/exits.

JustAFriend
2007-Jul-13, 04:52 PM
Weasels. Definitely weasels....

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-13, 05:11 PM
Ummm...what's a 'pinkie'? The only kind of 'pinkie' I can think of is the end finger on your hand.

I'm assuming you meant a different kind of pinkie.

I've never had a snake, hence my naive question.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jul-13, 05:30 PM
Pinkie - hairless dead frozen baby mouse.

Yum.

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-13, 06:51 PM
Ugh.

Well, to each his own. Must taste good to the snake. ;)

jfribrg
2007-Jul-13, 07:34 PM
I can't help you much, other than to suggest you look in high places, but I have had 3 experiences with lost snakes. The worst one was when my brother let our pet rat snake get too close to a crack in our concrete steps and it got its head into the crack and slowly slithered into the ground never to be seen again. When it was half way into the ground we had the choice of pulling it out and probably killing it, or watch it finish its escape. we chose the latter.

A couple years later we had a 5 foot pine snake that disappeared for a few hours. We found it of all places in my mothers nightgown that was hanging on a hook on her bedroom door. I assume the snake instinctively looked for a high location to hide (in the wild it probably holes up in tree cavities), and a nightgown on a door was the best it could find. We all breathed a sigh of relief that we found it before my mother would have that evening.

My earliest experience was with a garter snake I had. It got loose and slithered downstairs and across the rug. I just happened to be sitting there as I noticed it sliding past me, so I grabbed it and returned it to the terrarium.

Lurker
2007-Jul-13, 07:44 PM
My sons baby African garden snake escaped from his terrarium last night :doh:. I have looked everywhere but considering how small he is i cannot find him. I am looking for suggestions on luring him out of hiding. I am going to try placing his sleeping cave and a pinkie on the floor to see if he will eat and then hide in the cave.

Anyone have any suggestions ?

thanks in advance

PARENTS!!! Children can't leave 'em alone for a second!!! :mad:

mike alexander
2007-Jul-13, 08:50 PM
I'd just start by looking behind and beneath everything. Dark and warm spots: under bed, in the bed sheets, behind dressers, etc. Best of luck. Putting a snack in the middle of the floor and the watching from a hidden place might be a good idea, as noted.

Coincidence. Was pulling the cover off the pool last night and my wife found a 2' long rubber boa in one of the folds. Cool looking snakes, they are.

rebel
2007-Jul-14, 04:51 AM
My sons baby African garden snake escaped from his terrarium last night :doh:. I have looked everywhere but considering how small he is i cannot find him. I am looking for suggestions on luring him out of hiding. I am going to try placing his sleeping cave and a pinkie on the floor to see if he will eat and then hide in the cave.

Anyone have any suggestions ?

thanks in advance

If you build it he will come!:lol: But seriously, snakes will be attracted to the warmest things around. They need to warm up their blood, because they are cold blooded animals. Unfortunately it's summer time and your snake will survive outside just fine (for now). The truth being unless you lower the temperature in the house, you may never find him. After you've brought your room temperature down, then make one and only one warm spot for him to warm his blood. You might want to check your car engine, top to bottom, before you start it. I've heard of people chopping up cats and snakes before, :sick: they were trying to keep warm under the hood.

EDG
2007-Jul-14, 06:02 AM
Women are critter magnets :). I'd suggest accosting the nearest available lady (eg wife, mother, etc) - the more squeamish and critter-phobic the better. Place them in the house without telling them there's a snake on the loose. When you hear the screaming, she's found the snake :).

Jim
2007-Jul-14, 01:39 PM
Hmm, somewhat reminiscent of an episode of Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. They lost a snake under the stage floor boards and sent in a ferret to get it. The ferret wouldn't come out, so they sent in a coyote. The coyote wouldn't come out so they started tearing up the floor.

Your idea sounds better.

Whirlpool
2007-Jul-14, 01:42 PM
My sons baby African garden snake escaped from his terrarium last night :doh:. I have looked everywhere but considering how small he is i cannot find him. I am looking for suggestions on luring him out of hiding. I am going to try placing his sleeping cave and a pinkie on the floor to see if he will eat and then hide in the cave.

Anyone have any suggestions ?

thanks in advance

Uhh.. Mechtech, how old is your son?

BigDon
2007-Jul-15, 10:38 PM
Check the underside of the refridgerator first. My friends and I have kept tanks and critters for decades. He will be drawn to the warm air at the bottom and may crawl up the back. How big is he? Any other warm air source like the aforementioned computer on the floor will draw it as well.

Tobin Dax
2007-Jul-16, 02:27 AM
Hmm, somewhat reminiscent of an episode of Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. They lost a snake under the stage floor boards and sent in a ferret to get it. The ferret wouldn't come out, so they sent in a coyote. The coyote wouldn't come out so they started tearing up the floor.

Your idea sounds better.

"I don't know why / She swallowed a fly. / Perhaps she'll die."
It's been years since I've thought of that song, but it was the first thing to pop in my head when reading Jim's post.

BigDon
2007-Jul-16, 08:34 AM
"I don't know why / She swallowed a fly. / Perhaps she'll die."
It's been years since I've thought of that song, but it was the first thing to pop in my head when reading Jim's post.

I used to sing that one to my children, my mother sang it to me, her mother...

How old is that song? Ooops nevermind hijack sorry. Snake is the issue.

Tog
2007-Jul-16, 10:02 AM
I had a ball python for about 8 years, he got out twice. Once I found him curled up next to his cage, and the second time I found him when he fell on my while I was sleeping.

My guess is, you will probably have to just get lucky. Under the refrigerator as a good bet. Placing a plug in heat rock someplace might lure him out as well. Put out some water for him. Maybe put out an identical container somewhere where he can't reach so you can see if he's drinking of if the water is just evaporating. If he does drink, put some flour on the floor around the water to see of you can get an idea of which way he goes.

If you have a vacuum like a shop-vac with a burrow-like hose, check in there. Our tarantula used to love hanging out in ours when he'd get out. If it's a baby, it will probably like to stay hidden as much as possible. Again, under an appliance is a great place to hide.

Swift
2007-Jul-16, 01:26 PM
We had a pet garter snake that escaped when I was a kid. It was found in my mom's shoe, when she stuck her foot in the shoe! :surprised

DaveC426913
2007-Jul-16, 01:42 PM
We had a pet garter snake that escaped when I was a kid. It was found in my mom's shoe, when she stuck her foot in the shoe! :surprised
Yep. I'm thinkin' EDG's post #13 (http://www.bautforum.com/1029543-post13.html) is your best bet.

MechTech
2007-Jul-16, 05:11 PM
Got em

Put a nice sheet of paper with the warming pad under it. Placed his cave on that and put a nice Fresh pinkie in front. Waited untill morning and there he was fat and sleepy.
Boy am I glad i didnt have to tear the house apart he is only 6 inches long and there are probably a million places for him to Hide

Thanks for all your advice

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Jul-16, 05:22 PM
Let me be the first to congratulate you on the recovery of your snake, and to offer it with a bit of song:

My boa friend's back, there ain't gonna be no trouble.

Chorus: Hey la! Hey la! My boa friend's back!

A fresh Pinkie brought him back on the double.

Chorus: Hey la! Hey la! My boa friend's back!
:)

Moose
2007-Jul-16, 05:37 PM
Cool. :) Glad you found him.

Tobin Dax
2007-Jul-16, 10:12 PM
Cool. :) Glad you found him.
:confused: I thought there was a heating pad involved. Wouldn't it be warm? :whistle:

mike alexander
2007-Jul-16, 11:35 PM
CM, that was terrible. Well done.

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 05:07 AM
Nice Mech!

A friend of mine has a wee little snake she keeps in a custom lexan inclosure in her living room. Once a month she feeds it a goat. (Feeder goats are only 80 dollars a piece at the slaughterhouse, a bargain since thats cheaper than canned dog food.)

Came home one day to find it missing. Because of a break in and loss of a bunch of their reptiles years earlier they had a closed circuit tv system that activates when they set their burglar alarm. Seems the snake let himself out by pushing against two sides until the frame gave. (constrictors can squeeze or push with equal strength. When in underground passages that are too narrow to coil around their prey they crush their prey against the tunnel sides)

After accounting for the kids and the other pets they cleared the house and started looking cautiously. Found it coiled around the toilet of the downstairs bathroom. When they tried to induce it to move so they could recover it and return him to his cage it contracted down and crushed the toilet. The cold water then annoyed it into uncoiling wereupon hubby and the brother-in-laws corraled it again.

Tog
2007-Jul-17, 06:31 AM
Heh heh, snakes are fun. The ex GF once mentioned to someone that I had a few snakes and lizards. This person told her that they were going out of the country for a while and would asked if I would be wiling to babysit their reticulated python.

Not simply "no". A very firm, slightly agitated, expletive laden "NO!" felt like the best response. I was told that it was still a juvenile so it was only about 18 feet long, and very well behaved, for a "re-tic".

I have a firm belief that no one should ever trust any creature that can fit its whole brain in its mouth.

Glad you found the little guy. Now that he's home safe, here's my not so happy, and kind of creepy, story. I had a Chinese water dragon for about 7 years. At one point it found itself without a cage, so I let it run around a bit. It never left the upper floor of the house. One day it turned up missing. I did almost of the things suggested here. Dragons like to be high up, so it never really occurred to me to look in the dark basement, under a set of shelves. The one thing that gave me a bit of hope that she was still alive was that there was never that smell. I found her 6 months later. Sitting on the carpet in the basement, under the shelf, totally mummified.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-17, 08:17 AM
After accounting for the kids and the other pets

I love to pull things out of context :D

mfumbesi
2007-Jul-17, 09:15 AM
I live in Africa, here there are people who keep hyenas as pets, but Its really beyond me why would anyone (white people :lol:) keep a python as a pet. Our local giant python (South African) is known to take (eat) young kids, I would grow an ulcer with worry if kept one of those as I have a five year old.

m1omg
2007-Jul-17, 09:15 AM
I'm glad that you caught him back :)

m1omg
2007-Jul-17, 09:17 AM
Heh heh, snakes are fun. The ex GF once mentioned to someone that I had a few snakes and lizards. This person told her that they were going out of the country for a while and would asked if I would be wiling to babysit their reticulated python.

Not simply "no". A very firm, slightly agitated, expletive laden "NO!" felt like the best response. I was told that it was still a juvenile so it was only about 18 feet long, and very well behaved, for a "re-tic".

I have a firm belief that no one should ever trust any creature that can fit its whole brain in its mouth.

Glad you found the little guy. Now that he's home safe, here's my not so happy, and kind of creepy, story. I had a Chinese water dragon for about 7 years. At one point it found itself without a cage, so I let it run around a bit. It never left the upper floor of the house. One day it turned up missing. I did almost of the things suggested here. Dragons like to be high up, so it never really occurred to me to look in the dark basement, under a set of shelves. The one thing that gave me a bit of hope that she was still alive was that there was never that smell. I found her 6 months later. Sitting on the carpet in the basement, under the shelf, totally mummified.

:sad: That's really a creepy (and sad) story.

Moose
2007-Jul-17, 09:42 AM
I live in Africa, here there are people who keep hyenas as pets, but Its really beyond me why would anyone (white people :lol:) keep a python as a pet. Our local giant python (South African) is known to take (eat) young kids, I would grow an ulcer with worry if kept one of those as I have a five year old.

As I understand it, the trick is to keep 'em well fed. If they go hungry, they're dangerous. If they get used to being fed by a human, they'll get lazy enough to no longer want to hunt.

mfumbesi
2007-Jul-17, 09:49 AM
As I understand it, the trick is to keep 'em well fed. If they go hungry, they're dangerous. If they get used to being fed by a human, they'll get lazy enough to no longer want to hunt.

Well I have read a local story where a python took the family cat. I suppose it was just trying to be the only pet.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-17, 10:18 AM
If I were a python that got enough easy or prekilled catches, I'd refrain from hunting a vicious ball of claws and teeth.

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 10:45 AM
Nick, you've never seen a python make a kill. I have a little ol' ball python and after it got to six feet I no longer let my kids put him around their necks. Tuby (Thats pronounced Toobie not Tubby. ) got startled one day and put the squeeze on my arm. He had more than enough strength to seperate cervical vertebra. Other wise he's perfectly sweet. Never tries to bite and loves to be handled.

mfumbesi - welcome, I don't think we've met yet. Yeah, I wonder about us too. Man down in a town south of me (San Jose) had an Egyptian Cobra, a very poor choice for a pet. It nailed him with a solid bite and the man was stone dead by the time the parmedics arrived 14 minutes after the 911 call. Thats one of the fastest deaths through envenomation I've ever heard of.

mfumbesi
2007-Jul-17, 10:52 AM
mfumbesi - welcome, I don't think we've met yet. Yeah, I wonder about us too. Man down in a town south of me (San Jose) had an Egyptian Cobra, a very poor choice for a pet. It nailed him with a solid bite and the man was stone dead by the time the parmedics arrived 14 minutes after the 911 call. Thats one of the fastest deaths through envenomation I've ever heard of.

Thanks BigDon, I've been around here for the past few (3-4 years lurking and joined in 2005) years, I am a slow typer.
Are there any Americans who keep Black Mambas, those are fast, with a bad attitude (they actually attack without any provocation) and deadly.

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 11:18 AM
Not that I know of, but I'd bet the rent money there is. (I type slow too)