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a1call
2007-Jul-16, 12:18 AM
I like shiny stuff. :)


An Apollo 11 stereo view showing a close-up of a small lump of lunar surface powder about a half inch across, with various small pieces of different color. Many small, shiny spherical particles can be seen. The picture is three inches across. The exposure was made by the Apollo 11 35mm stereo close-up camera.

Source (http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=925531&id=7&qs=No%3D100%26N%3D219%2B4294964632#bctop)

Bigger image here (http://starryskies.com/The_sky/events/lunar-2003/3d.apollo11.rocks.html)

Any ideas of what they could be?
Perhaps melted iron drops cooled at low Lunar gravity?

01101001
2007-Jul-16, 12:45 AM
Any ideas of what they could be?

The usual glassy spheres?

Clavius.org: Envionment :: soil (http://www.clavius.org/envsoil.html)


Fig. 1 - The orange lunar soil discovered by Apollo 17 astronauts, as seen through a microscope. Some particles are spherical, indicating they were formed as molten drops ejected from an impact. Others are irregular, formed by mechanical fractures.

National Air and Space Museum: Soil, the surface layer (http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/ATTM/nojs/wl.so.1.html)


Lunar soil contains fragments of the major lunar rock types: basalt (A), anorthosite (B), and breccia (C). In addition, round glass particles (D) are common. The fragments that make up lunar soil are the products of the ceaseless bombardment of the Moon by meteoroids which smash and grind rocks into soil and weld soil into new rocks.

http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/ATTM/nojs/nsthumbs/ns_S70-55663.t.jpg (http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/ATTM/atmimages/S70-55663.f.jpg)

a1call
2007-Jul-16, 01:14 AM
Well the glass would explain "various small pieces of different color" as well as "shiny".

Thanks for the links and the info.

The Apollo 11 crew must have felt like Alice in the wonderland. It's probably unimaginable how they must have felt. :)

Ufonaut99
2007-Jul-16, 01:58 AM
If you want a really close up look :
"A Spherule from the Earth's Moon" (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070520.html)

a1call
2007-Jul-16, 04:07 PM
Couldn't load the image yesterday, but works today.
Quite fascinating.

Grashtel
2007-Jul-17, 02:08 PM
Couldn't load the image yesterday, but works today.
Quite fascinating.
There was a message saying that the server was having problems, it is presumably fixed now as everything seems to be working.

John Mendenhall
2007-Jul-17, 02:54 PM
If you want a really close up look :
"A Spherule from the Earth's Moon" (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap070520.html)

Everything we normally handle, except for hydrogen and helium and maybe some other gases, has probably been in a supernova, and then in a mineral form, and impacted, blasted, crunched, heated, etc. What a thought!