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dgavin
2007-Jul-16, 02:34 PM
Do dogs preceive a change in TV quality when upgrading to HD?

Well I think they do. We got out first 50inch Plasma yesterday, and this mornign I turned in onto Discovery HD Theater.

There was an un-narrated show on with brown bears in alaska.

One of my dogs was -so- instrested in the bears, she actualy will stand on her hind legs to get better look at them on the new TV.

She never did that with the old one.

If nothing else the new TV is going to be hours of laughs when the Dog's are watching it like this LOL

antoniseb
2007-Jul-16, 02:45 PM
I didn't see the connection from this to Astronomy or Spaceflight, so I moved it to OTB from Q&A.

Noclevername
2007-Jul-16, 02:52 PM
If nothing else the new TV is going to be hours of laughs when the Dog's are watching it like this LOL


Good to know that all that money wasn't wasted. :rolleyes: ;)

Fazor
2007-Jul-16, 03:08 PM
Well, keep in mind that if your dogs are anything like mine, they might have been just trying to get a better look/sniff at the new *thing* that's taking up 50+ inches of their home. They are very aware of their invironment, and they get curious when something new moves in. I know mine do anyway. About a month ago I built a new computer desk (IKEA style, I'm not *that* much of a handyman). My dogs spent a good hour sniffing and walking around it, then spent another hour or more laying there looking at it.

Of course, maybe they were intrigued by the pictures of the bears. I know once starwars was on tv and my cat would sit there staring at the screen, and every dime Vader would come on, he'd run and hide behind the couch, and wouldn't come back out 'till Vader was gone. Was quite funny.

SeanF
2007-Jul-16, 03:47 PM
Of course, maybe they were intrigued by the pictures of the bears. I know once starwars was on tv and my cat would sit there staring at the screen, and every dime Vader would come on, he'd run and hide behind the couch, and wouldn't come back out 'till Vader was gone. Was quite funny.
:lol: That is funny.

I would suspect that Vader's breathing sound effect was what he found so disconcerting - similar to a snake's hiss, perhaps?

Nicolas
2007-Jul-16, 04:47 PM
...or a cat's hiss...

Swift
2007-Jul-16, 06:32 PM
Of course, maybe they were intrigued by the pictures of the bears. I know once starwars was on tv and my cat would sit there staring at the screen, and every dime Vader would come on, he'd run and hide behind the couch, and wouldn't come back out 'till Vader was gone. Was quite funny.
Strong in this feline is Force.
http://www.comixfan.com/xfan/forums/images/smilies/yoda.gif

SeanF
2007-Jul-16, 06:34 PM
...or a cat's hiss...
:doh: Yeah, that's probably more likely.

Lurker
2007-Jul-16, 06:36 PM
I didn't see the connection from this to Astronomy or Spaceflight, so I moved it to OTB from Q&A.
Well... I think this could have serious repercussions if dogs were taken on spaceflights with HDTV's on board. They might not realize that these were not real images and that bouncing about in the spacecraft might not be wise!! :whistle:

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 04:42 AM
Dogs cannot percieve tv images as humans do. 24 frames per second is too slow and its just a bunch of flickering stills. A tv made for dogs would have to have a rate approaching 100 frames per second.

BUT I know zip point squat about how HD works.

01101001
2007-Jul-17, 04:52 AM
Dogs cannot percieve tv images as humans do. 24 frames per second is too slow and its just a bunch of flickering stills. A tv made for dogs would have to have a rate approaching 100 frames per second.

TV's not 24 frames/second. But, TVs probably flicker for dogs.

What do dogs see? (http://psychlops.psy.uconn.edu/eric/class/dogvision.html)


The frequency at which rapidly flickering light fuses appears to fuse into a constantly illuminated light is termed "flicker fusion" and can be used by investigators to gain information about the retinal rods and cones. In most humans, flicker fusion occurs at around 50 to 60 Hz, although some people can detect flicker up to about 70 Hz. It appears that the flicker fusion rate for most dogs may be as high as 70 to 80 Hz. How is this important to hunting retrievers? This may explain why our dogs don't spend much time watching television! The refresh rate on televisions is about 60 Hz, hence we perceive the television image as a smooth image, but to our dogs it may appear as a rapidly flickering image.

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 05:11 AM
Well, at least I halfassed the explaination, thanks 011. I always know that if I'm off a little bit someone here will correct me and show me the error of my ways.

(Don't read any of that as hostile)

dgavin
2007-Jul-17, 05:57 AM
Well I just looked up some information and the model I have has a 200mhz refresh rate at 1080i (or 100mhz interlaced).

From what I read at various web site for CRT TV's 22-36 inches typicaly are 70mhz minimum, 36-44 are 80-100mhz.

Plasmas, LCD and DLP HDTV's all seem to sport 100mhz minimum, with anything over 44inches usualy 200mhz (100mhz interlaced) or 100mhz progressive.

This might partly explain why my dog was so intent on the picture, as it was an HD channel. They defiately don't care about the non HD channels. She definately was curious about the bears though, as she would follow them with her eyes.

That cat hiding from Vader though, that would of been even funnier to see. Maybe it knows something we don't? lol

EricM407
2007-Jul-17, 01:44 PM
TV's not 24 frames/second. But, TVs probably flicker for dogs.

What do dogs see? (http://psychlops.psy.uconn.edu/eric/class/dogvision.html)

This is discussing two separate things, and not very clearly. Don't know about dogs, but humans only need 24 fps to perceive motion as opposed to a series of still frames. If the light output is cycling (as in a projector when the blade passes, or a CRT when it scans), then they need 60+ Hz to not see flicker. Seeing flicker does not mean motion isn't being perceived, it's just annoying.

Movie theaters run film at 24 fps and open and close the shutter multiple times per frame to get rid of flicker.

TVs, for the most part, refresh at 60 Hz in US and 50 Hz in PAL countries. But with modern progressive displays, that's really not needed. The screen updates frame after frame with no blank in between, so there's no light cycling, no flicker. 24 Hz would look fine, if that's the frame rate the source was sampled at, which is pretty much all movies.

EricM407
2007-Jul-17, 02:12 PM
Well I just looked up some information and the model I have has a 200mhz refresh rate at 1080i (or 100mhz interlaced).

From what I read at various web site for CRT TV's 22-36 inches typicaly are 70mhz minimum, 36-44 are 80-100mhz.

Plasmas, LCD and DLP HDTV's all seem to sport 100mhz minimum, with anything over 44inches usualy 200mhz (100mhz interlaced) or 100mhz progressive.

I'm not sure what you were looking at, but those aren't refresh rates. Your plasma most likely refreshes at 60 Hz.

There's little benefit to refreshing a plasma (or LCD or DLP) at rates higher than the sample rate of the source, because they don't flicker. A 24 fps source refreshed at 24 Hz, 48 Hz, 120 Hz or 1200 Hz will look exactly the same.

The only real benefit of a higher rate is to choose one (because it's very costly to build a TV capable of doing multiple rates, and they don't) that's a multiple of the common sampling rates used in film and video (24, 30, 60 fps), so that lopsided cadences don't have to be used to fit the source to your display. There are a few 120 Hz displays out right now that do this, and more coming in the near future.

dgavin
2007-Jul-17, 02:42 PM
Well either way, i turned on the Discovery HD Sunrise Earth again this morning. And the dog is totaly into it. Seals, seaguls and Augustin Volcano this morning.

She seemed to like the Seal's most lol