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phaishazamkhan
2007-Jul-17, 12:59 AM
Would I be correct guessing that water has chirality? Would water that is a different chirality than my body's chirality quench my thirst and rehydrate me or would it simply be unusuable mass in my alimentary canal? Has such a beast been discovered on Earth or created in a laboratory or is it purely theoretical?

snarkophilus
2007-Jul-17, 01:39 AM
Water does not have chirality. (The molecule has C2v symmetry.)

Hornblower
2007-Jul-17, 01:50 AM
Would I be correct guessing that water has chirality? Would water that is a different chirality than my body's chirality quench my thirst and rehydrate me or would it simply be unusuable mass in my alimentary canal? Has such a beast been discovered on Earth or created in a laboratory or is it purely theoretical?

No.

It isn't even theoretical. A water molecule, consisting of three atoms in a triangular pattern, is inherently non-chiral. It is a two-dimensional pattern, as is any triangular object, and the third dimension is needed before chirality can happen.

See the following Wiki article on chirality.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_(chemistry)

01101001
2007-Jul-17, 02:43 AM
left handed water

Just curious. Which did you think is the "left-handed" water, the one you thought you consumed every day, or the one whose existence you wondered about?

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 04:02 AM
Could he be thinking of heavy water toxicity? D2O is very bad for you to drink.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D2O

Noclevername
2007-Jul-17, 04:52 AM
You're looking at it from the wrong side. Turn it over. ;)

snarkophilus
2007-Jul-17, 07:38 AM
It is a two-dimensional pattern, as is any triangular object, and the third dimension is needed before chirality can happen.
When considering chirality, you have to count the lone electron pairs, which make it three dimensional, so it looks like the CH2Cl2 molecule as shown here (http://www.cas.astate.edu/draganjac/pointgroupanswers.html) (but it's still achiral).

mfumbesi
2007-Jul-17, 09:35 AM
You're looking at it from the wrong side. Turn it over. ;)

As always that was hilarious:lol:

Tobin Dax
2007-Jul-17, 10:19 AM
Could he be thinking of heavy water toxicity? D2O is very bad for you to drink.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D2O
Maybe, but D2O is still symmetrical. HDO isn't, but it's still not chiral.

BigDon
2007-Jul-17, 10:27 AM
Truth to tell I don't know what chiral means. Too tired to look it up ATM.

grant hutchison
2007-Jul-17, 10:41 AM
Truth to tell I don't know what chiral means. Too tired to look it up ATM.it comes from the Greek word for "hand". It refers to molecules that exist in two mirror-image forms (like your left and right hand, or left and right gloves). You need a certain level of complexity to produce such an object, and water isn't complex enough. Lots of biological molecules are chiral, including most amino acids and sugars, and we can generally metabolize one mirror-form but not the other.

Grant Hutchison

Swift
2007-Jul-17, 01:22 PM
it comes from the Greek word for "hand". It refers to molecules that exist in two mirror-image forms (like your left and right hand, or left and right gloves). You need a certain level of complexity to produce such an object, and water isn't complex enough. Lots of biological molecules are chiral, including most amino acids and sugars, and we can generally metabolize one mirror-form but not the other.

Grant Hutchison
And chiral molecules are optically active, they rotate the plane of plane-polarized light. This very nice website from SUNY-Buffalo (http://www.nsm.buffalo.edu/~jochena/research/opticalactivity.html) has a good explanation and some nice animations.

snarkophilus
2007-Jul-17, 07:56 PM
Maybe, but D2O is still symmetrical. HDO isn't, but it's still not chiral.
HDO is symmetrical: it has a symmetry plane through the O, H, and D. It's less symmetric than H2O, though.

m1omg
2007-Jul-17, 09:09 PM
Water has hands :lol:?

mike alexander
2007-Jul-17, 09:45 PM
Not exactly. Since people tend to wash both hands at once the mirror-image effects cancel out and the water they use remains achiral.

DyerWolf
2007-Jul-17, 10:10 PM
No.

It isn't even theoretical. A water molecule, consisting of three atoms in a triangular pattern, is inherently non-chiral. It is a two-dimensional pattern, as is any triangular object, and the third dimension is needed before chirality can happen.

See the following Wiki article on chirality.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_(chemistry)

That is a great link! I found this part especially enlightening:

"Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name."

01101001
2007-Jul-17, 10:28 PM
"Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name."

Did you then try: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirality_(chemistry) ?

Peter Wilson
2007-Jul-17, 10:43 PM
Not exactly. Since people tend to wash both hands at once the mirror-image effects cancel out and the water they use remains achiral.
Unless they drink it through a left-handed straw ;)

Gemini
2007-Jul-18, 04:19 AM
Is left handed water like a left handed cigarette?

Glom
2007-Jul-18, 11:35 AM
Truth to tell I don't know what chiral means. Too tired to look it up ATM.

The examples of chirality I learnt were C molecules where a C atom has something different on every bond, such as Chloro-Fluoro-Bromo-Methane (where the carbon bonds to chlorine, fluorine, bromine and hydrogen) or 2-chloro-butane (where you have a carbon bonded to a methyl group, a hydrogen, a chlorine and an ethyl group). You'll find that such molecules have no reflective symmetry. No matter how you turn it around, you cannot make it into the reflection of itself.

One Skunk Todd
2007-Jul-18, 04:41 PM
Water has hands :lol:?

Well, water has music, and Water Music was by "Hand"el, so.... :)