PDA

View Full Version : # of worlds ?



CAPT CRUSTY
2007-Jul-18, 05:36 PM
what is the total current count of celestial bodies in the solar system.......planets and moons ?

pumpkinpie
2007-Jul-18, 05:44 PM
Planets: 8
Moons: Around the eight planets there is a total of 165 moons, according to this website (http://www.madison.k12.wi.us/planetarium/teachers.htm#moons).
However, that doesn't take into account the moons around dwarf planets, asteroids, etc. I'm not sure of that number, but I know there is one moon around Ida, three around Pluto, and some of the recent KBOs have moons.

Other celestial bodies: Too numerous to count. Asteroids, comets, KBOs, interplanetary dust grains, satellites, space junk. I wouldn't want to be in charge of coming up with an exact number!

01101001
2007-Jul-18, 05:59 PM
Welcome to the BAUT Forum, CAPT CRUSTY.


Other celestial bodies: Too numerous to count. Asteroids, comets, KBOs, interplanetary dust grains, satellites, space junk.

Wikipedia: Astronomical object (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomical_object) lists some types of objects not all of which are bodies (and tries to define celestial body, too).

But, "planets and moons" is a good qualifier to the question. Trouble is, 'moon' isn't a solidly defined concept, so you have to be flexible on accepting who's counting what.

grant hutchison
2007-Jul-18, 06:06 PM
Planets: 8
Moons: Around the eight planets there is a total of 165 moons, according to this website (http://www.madison.k12.wi.us/planetarium/teachers.htm#moons). Another reported today, in IAU Circular 8857. :)
Provisionally designated S/2007 S4, it was found by the Cassini team.

Edit: There are also three additional Saturnian satellite designations that are not listed by Scott Sheppard on his Saturnian satellite page (http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/~sheppard/satellites/satsatdata.html), which is a data source for the website you link to: these are S/2004 S3, S/2004 S4 and S/2004 S6, all from the Cassini team. They were originally reported as possible satellites but possibly just clumps of F-ring material. I don't know whether they are awaiting confirmation, or have definitely been dismissed as ring clumps. Their orbits were expected to be chaotic, so recovery may be difficult.

So the count (as of today!) for the eight planets is: Mercury 0; Venus 0; Earth 1; Mars 2; Jupiter 63; Saturn 60+?3; Uranus 27; Neptune 13.
For the three dwarf planets we have: Ceres 0; Pluto 3; Eris 1.

Grant Hutchison

Lord Jubjub
2007-Jul-18, 11:12 PM
The count of asteroids in the Main Belts count is in the hundreds at least.

The Centaurs (between Jupiter and Neptune) account for about a hundred.

KBOs appear to be in the low hundreds.

I'm not quite sure what the comet count is.

antoniseb
2007-Jul-19, 12:00 PM
The count of asteroids in the Main Belts count is in the hundreds at least.

You can look these things up. The number of asteroids known now with confirmed orbits is quite high. So is the number of trojans. Take a look at this map (http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/lists/InnerPlot.html).

The number of main belt asteroids known so far is well over 100,000.

EDG
2007-Jul-19, 04:05 PM
http://ciclops.org/view.php?id=3352

Saturn just got satellite #60.

grant hutchison
2007-Jul-19, 04:07 PM
Saturn just got satellite #60.
ToSeeked, and in this very thread :):

Another reported today, in IAU Circular 8857.
Provisionally designated S/2007 S4, it was found by the Cassini team.
Grant Hutchison

01101001
2007-Jul-20, 12:23 AM
At least 8 hours have passed.

Now, how many moons does Saturn have?

grant hutchison
2007-Jul-20, 11:11 AM
At least 8 hours have passed.

Now, how many moons does Saturn have?Still 60, and those three possibles.
The discovery rate is clearly tapering off ...

Grant Hutchison