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Fraser
2007-Jul-19, 05:57 PM
Two X-Ray satellites have been studying one of the largest galaxy collisions in the Universe, gathering evidence that these clusters can collide much faster than astronomers previously believed. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/07/19/biggest-collisions-in-the-universe/)

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 06:44 AM
How can something like a gas heat to 50 million degrees C and still bear any resemblance to matter? As a furniture mover, I would have thought that all the stuff would be excited to sub-atomic particles at those energy levels.

thothicabob
2007-Jul-20, 06:57 AM
How can something like a gas heat to 50 million degrees C and still bear any resemblance to matter? As a furniture mover, I would have thought that all the stuff would be excited to sub-atomic particles at those energy levels.

As a furniture mover, huh? Hmm. Think really really REALLY powerful microwave oven.

Actually, those are just really really REALLY excited atoms looking for their lost electrons...and they're not only pretty sure they're missing...

...they're positive!


(couldn't resist...it's not often you find such an opening here.) :shifty:

m1omg
2007-Jul-20, 02:18 PM
How can something like a gas heat to 50 million degrees C and still bear any resemblance to matter? As a furniture mover, I would have thought that all the stuff would be excited to sub-atomic particles at those energy levels.

Actually, you must heat matter to more than billion degress Celsius to excite matter to nucleonic plasma.
The cores of supergiant stars are about 1GK and are still normal matter from chemical elements.

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 10:46 PM
m1, yeah but the core of a star has all the gravitic pressure to keep them that way. This is a free gas! (Not that I'm in a position to doubt your physics)