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View Full Version : YUCK! Do people really do things this wacky??



Paracelsus
2007-Jul-19, 10:23 PM
Via Yahoo! News: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070719/ap_on_he_me/placenta_lawsuit;_ylt=ApJT4eH.cjKPSNXyiYFJubPVJRIF


LAS VEGAS - A woman has won a court fight to keep the placenta after her daughter's birth. She had planned to grind it up and ingest it as a way to fight postpartum depression, but now plans to bury it.
Clark County District Court Judge Susan Johnson granted a preliminary injunction Tuesday, ordering Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center in southern Nevada to return the placenta to Anne Swanson.

As far as the claim that eating one's own placenta prevents post-partum depression goes, I found this during a quick lit search on Google Scholar: http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~kristal/DiPirro_and_Kristal.pdf.

Apparantly, ingesting one's own placenta after giving birth enhances the pain-relieving actions of one's endogeous opioids, if you happen to be a mother rat.

I didn't do an extensive google search, so there may be more out there.

Still...YUCK!! :sick::sick::sick::sick::sick::sick:

Nicolas
2007-Jul-19, 10:29 PM
Never will be a point of discussion for me, as I'm never hungry the first few hours after I fainted. ;)

Moose
2007-Jul-19, 10:34 PM
Heh. Whenever I read thread subjects phrased like this one, I invariably think: "If you gotta ask, the answer is 'YES!'"

I've yet to be wrong on this one.

mike alexander
2007-Jul-19, 10:38 PM
On the other hand, why shouldn't she be allowed to have her placenta? I mean, they gave her the baby, right?

I state here that I am firmly on the side of maternal placental rights. Even if she cooks it up with onions.

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-19, 10:47 PM
Here's an interesting article on posrpartum depression: http://www.obgyn.net/femalepatient/default.asp?page=leopold

This article summarizes the result of a small clinical trial, in which transdermal estrogen delivery postpartum seemed to ameliorate PPD:


However, the only prospective treatment trial aimed at a potential etiologic factor in postpartum depression was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial by Gregoire and colleagues,13 who randomly treated 61 patients affected by postpartum depression with either transdermal estrogen or placebo for 6 months. They showed a significant, rapid, and stable fall in the patient- and clinician-rated depression scores of the estrogen-treated group, with only 50% and 20% of treated patients depressed at 1 and 4 months, respectively. By contrast, 74% and 69% remained depressed in the placebo group.

BigDon
2007-Jul-19, 11:45 PM
If the French have a name for it, that means they're doing it

It's called placentophagy (sp) its in wikipedia, saw it last night while looking up cannibalism. (It's not considered cannibalism)

pzkpfw
2007-Jul-20, 12:23 AM
My wife and I considered it after our second child was born. (At home, that's an epic story in itself).

In the end it just stayed in the freezer for a few weeks too long, then got buried up our hill behind some wildling pines.

I need to cut down those (now much larger) pines, but have an "attachment" to them.

Darn. Should've just eaten it.

(It's like liver, apparently, which I like.)

Moose
2007-Jul-20, 01:28 AM
(It's like liver, apparently, which I like.)

(Egh). Well, at least now we know what goes well with placenta. Fava beans and a nice Chianti.

Captain Kidd
2007-Jul-20, 01:35 AM
...saw it last night while looking up cannibalism.There's a question there that I'm not wanting to ask. ;)

Gotta say, this is a new one on me and I thought we had been given most of the ... rather interesting recommendations.

Lord Jubjub
2007-Jul-20, 02:16 AM
If the French have a name for it, that means they're doing it

It's called placentophagy (sp) its in wikipedia, saw it last night while looking up cannibalism. (It's not considered cannibalism)

I was going to ask if eating your own flesh would be considered cannibalism but never mind . . .:hand:

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 02:33 AM
There's a question there that I'm not wanting to ask. ;)

Gotta say, this is a new one on me and I thought we had been given most of the ... rather interesting recommendations.


Well I was just trying to find out if they had any better treatment for wendigo psychosis, as I'm running out of places to hide all the bones. :whistle:

(Don't worry, I'm good until at least the end of August.)

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Jul-20, 04:32 AM
I knew there was a reason for Placenta HelperTM! Mmmm!

Maksutov
2007-Jul-20, 04:36 AM
Blast it, C M! You beat me to it by three minutes! (http://static.flickr.com/135/326652464_c9be104ded.jpg)

mike alexander
2007-Jul-20, 04:40 AM
At least we seem to have one exotic food that nobody claims tastes like chicken.

publius
2007-Jul-20, 04:41 AM
Pardon me while I get a bucket and go puker my guts out......

Hasten, Jason, bring the basin! Plop, too late, bring the mop.....


-Richard

Nicolas
2007-Jul-20, 08:11 AM
Lol :D

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 08:25 AM
Pardon me while I get a bucket and go puker my guts out......

Hasten, Jason, bring the basin! Plop, too late, bring the mop.....


-Richard


Don't you hate it when you're seriously nauseated at the hospital and they bring you one of those silly*** kidney basins? Its like excuse me nurse, I'm a big boy, I need a bucket!

Tog
2007-Jul-20, 08:38 AM
Well, this seems like a good time to bring this up, so to speak. From time to time I get something I call "The Oobe" (Open on both ends, stolen from a TV show) I'm not sure what brings it on, but it hits every 1.5 to 4 years, usually about bed time. I end up throwing up 5 to 7 times total, the first two or three are almost always while seated in a special chair. (See definition for Oobe). I have learned something that, while disgusting to many, might come in handy.

If you know you will be throwing up more than once, drink about a pint of water as soon as you've finished the first one. The first thing this does is stops the dry heave, but the second, and much more important thing it does is to wash out your nose the next time you throw up. By the third trip in, you should no longer have have any of that sticky, nasty smell lodged up there.

Nicolas
2007-Jul-20, 08:39 AM
I don't have personal experience with the kidney bassins, but they do seem really small to me too.

Tog
2007-Jul-20, 08:47 AM
I don't have personal experience with the kidney bassins, but they do seem really small to me too.

And they seem to be an amazingly poor shape as well. One time, with the Oobe, I managed to force 1/2 a macadamia nut through a nostril. I felt it rattle though my sinuses, then felt it stick, the pressure build, "then FOOM, like a rat out of an aqueduct". I can't see one of those little things containing that much stuff coming out with that much force, without either blowing it out of your hand or having it hit the far side and spraying all over the area in front and proabably to both sides too.

snarkophilus
2007-Jul-20, 08:58 AM
I had a girlfriend who offered me placenta soup once. It was made after her mom had her last child, and had been frozen since, kept for special occasions. Apparently they did this after every child was born. I countered by suggesting we go out somewhere nice for dinner.

I did have trouble kissing her good-bye that night, knowing that she'd eaten placenta soup on several occasions. It's made of babies! Ewwwww. In truth, I'd have considered eating it if I trusted her mom's cooking, but I had heard way too many horror stories, and once experienced it myself. I could have pretended it was soylent green, which would be awesome.

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 09:01 AM
Well I was present for both my kids coming into the world and I've seen placentas. I'll add that to balut as something I'll never voluntarily eat.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jul-20, 09:48 AM
You shouldn't eat other people's placentas. It's a health hazard. If you want to eat your own placenta that's up to you, after all, you're not going to catch something you haven't already got, but don't go offering it to other people.

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 10:33 AM
Yeah folks don't realize you can catch the flu from eating someone who has it. Then again, cannibals aren't know to be picky eaters. (Not counting the taboo agaist eating long pig with metal utensils)

crosscountry
2007-Jul-20, 10:38 AM
well cats do it. I've seen one, but I suspect it's more out of survival. the cat puts months into making that placenta and it is full of nutrients. This helps the animal recover from the incredible strain put on its body while carrying the litter.

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-20, 10:41 AM
One time, with the Oobe, I managed to force 1/2 a macadamia nut through a nostril. I felt it rattle though my sinuses, then felt it stick, the pressure build, "then FOOM, like a rat out of an aqueduct".

ROFLMAO!! :lol::lol::lol:

BigDon
2007-Jul-20, 10:42 AM
CC, thats common for even herbivores to do that.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jul-20, 11:03 AM
Yeah folks don't realize you can catch the flu from eating someone who has it. Then again, cannibals aren't know to be picky eaters. (Not counting the taboo agaist eating long pig with metal utensils)

Just look at all the trouble eating our chimpanzee cousins has caused.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-20, 11:15 AM
Oobes are pretty normal fare for migraneurs. BTW, for us the "oo" stands for "out of".

One of the first I experienced was when my wife and I were driving to Vermont one Saturday. She asked why I looked so distressed and was driving so fast. I explained I needed to find a gas station or restaurant pronto.

Fortunately the Mobil station had a setup where the sink was a short lean away from the toilet.

So much for our drive to Vermont.

Doodler
2007-Jul-20, 11:43 AM
I had a girlfriend who offered me placenta soup once. It was made after her mom had her last child, and had been frozen since, kept for special occasions. Apparently they did this after every child was born. I countered by suggesting we go out somewhere nice for dinner.

No less than three sexual innuendo responses arose in my mind after reading this, not one of them fit for this forum. However, I'm dying over here.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-20, 06:49 PM
http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a3_104.html

Trust Unca Cecil for all your placenta-related questions!

When my daughter was born, my doctor asked, in far more cheerful tones than I thought the question merited, if anyone wanted to see the placenta. Of the five of us in the delivery room at that point (my sister, my daughter's adoptive parents, a friend of mine, and me), only my sister took him up on the offer, and I doubt even she would've eaten the stuff. Even my raised-by-hippies, wants-to-be-a-midwife friend who complains when they don't show placenta on A Baby Story wouldn't eat it. She thinks it's gross.

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Jul-20, 07:22 PM
And then there's always ... the meconium.

No, it's not some obscure element on the periodic table. Look it up. But not within 2 hours of meal-time.

Can't imagine anyone wanting to eat that! :eek:

Nicolas
2007-Jul-20, 07:26 PM
I did not look it up, but I'm quite sure I have a good idea what it is. It's dark coloured, right? Say no more.

m1omg
2007-Jul-20, 09:43 PM
Yuck