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banquo's_bumble_puppy
2007-Jul-23, 01:27 PM
I found this CNN story interesting in that there is no mention of the WTC-

"Previous skyscraper record-holders include New York's Empire State Building at 1,250 feet; Shanghai's Jin Mao Building at 1,381 feet; Chicago's Sears Tower at 1,451 feet; and Malaysia's Petronas Towers at 1,483 feet."

http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/07/22/dubai.building.ap/index.html

01101001
2007-Jul-23, 01:44 PM
I found this CNN story interesting in that there is no mention of the WTC

It was tallest for such a short time after being built, quickly eclipsed by Sears.

I'm wondering about Jin Mao. Was it ever tallest? I thought it went WTC, Sears, Petronas, Taipei 101, and now Burj Dubai.

Jin Mao was shorter, and newer, than Sears, no? Did it hold any interesting record?

triplebird
2007-Jul-23, 04:16 PM
"Previous skyscraper record-holders include New York's Empire State Building at 1,250 feet; Shanghai's Jin Mao Building at 1,381 feet; Chicago's Sears Tower at 1,451 feet; and Malaysia's Petronas Towers at 1,483 feet."

I'd imagine CNN is only including skyscrapers that still stand in their report.

soylentgreen
2007-Jul-23, 04:55 PM
Edited from history? I found this CNN story interesting in that there is no mention of the WTC...

I don't see that being the case with this article...but it is a creeping reality in many other areas. Something I'm a bit sensitive to personally.

Most people are long familiar with the SPIDERMAN teaser controversy, but this "removal" process has occurred in all sorts of crazy corners. I, myself, managed to get my mitts on a Chock full 'o Nuts can with it's original skyline before they became scarce around here.

Similarly, some of the more recent monuments placed in towns and on battlefields show this continuing trend of, not necessarily rewriting history, but unremembering it. Monuments and memorials have always involved a great degree of self-serving sentimentalizing(go ask the Spartans!), but in the last few decades this has taken a twist in an Orwellian direction.

The study of "American Memory" is a fascinating, if not frequently heart-breaking area of sociolgy. The aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11th has been almost a field test of this trend. A chance to see the forces that warp social memory at work. Before the end of that Tuesday afternoon, many people rushed to draw parallels to the attack on Pearl Harbor, when in fact, the real parallels are with the immediate and short term (relatively speaking) effects in it's aftermath. We haven't gone as far as interning 'questionable patriots' but lurking under the headlines for the last six years has been all the same panicky business. :o

All helped by a kind of fickle sense of what's important. Think about it next time you're at a traffic light behind some SUV with it's faded-nearly-to-gone Twin Towers inside the Pentagon 9/11 sticker, or next to the fellow with just the white plastic rod sticking out of his rear window...'Old Glory' long blown off on some interstate. We appear to be great at instant memorialization(candle-light vigils, flag lapel pins, rock/celeb pr stunts...) but rather poor at long term commitment. These colors don't run...but they do forget. Sometimes, on purpose.

triplebird
2007-Jul-23, 07:06 PM
We...do forget. Sometimes, on purpose.

I know a little psychology, and it's a common defense mechanism to block out memories of traumatic events. Perhaps that's what is at work with the 9/11 memorials; people don't want to be reminded.

OTOH, people also are highly motivated by what's "in fashion" at the moment (as you allude to with "a...fickle sense of what's important.") Memorializing 9/11 and proclaiming "United We Stand" was fashionable five years ago, but out of style now. So people just move on to the next trend.
Too bad one of the worst disasters in American history goes down as little more than a fad in the minds of some--even those whose t-shirts and bumper stickers proclaim "9-11-01, never forget."