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View Full Version : can anyone answer this (Helium balloon to space)?



space101
2007-Jul-26, 12:24 AM
When a balloon is filled with helium & hypothetically if the helium is not going to be depleted from the balloon can the balloon reach into the space. If it can reach then how long will it take for it to reach?:lol: U may for sure find my doubts to be silly !! But I cant help it. I am just going nuts reading more and more abt our universe.:silenced:

pzkpfw
2007-Jul-26, 12:46 AM
No.

The weight of the balloon itself will mean the thing rises to a given height, and no more.

http://www.bautforum.com/questions-answers/61603-helium-space-launching.html

space101
2007-Jul-26, 01:34 AM
I did not understand. Can u please explain.:)

pzkpfw
2007-Jul-26, 01:39 AM
Get a ball filled with air.

Put it at the bottom of the swimming pool.

Let go.

It will rise to the surface of the pool, but will not continue rising into the air (apart from maybe it's initial "jump" out of the water).

The overall density of the ball is less than water but more than air.


Helium is not "anti-gravity" - it is simply lighter than air and makes the ballon less dense than the same volume of air. The ballon will not go into space, it will reach a point where it is no longer less dense than the stuff around it.


Please use the search feature, that thread I linked to is not the only one on this topic.

space101
2007-Jul-26, 01:49 AM
:clap:that was easy to understand. Thanx so much!!!

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-27, 05:04 PM
There's also the possibility that the balloon will burst. As it rises, the pressure of the air around the balloon will decrease. In response to this lessening of the surrounding pressure, the balloon will expand a bit. As this happens, the skin of the balloon will get thinner. There may come a point at which these two effects (i.e. thinning of the skin of the ballooon as it expands and reduced outside pressure and hence a larger gradient of pressure from inside to outside) in combination cause the balloon to burst.

RussT
2007-Jul-27, 08:11 PM
Moral to the story......

If you don't want your Bubble to burst, you better have Thick skin ;)))

EvilEye
2007-Jul-27, 11:26 PM
A balloon with a theoretical skin able to withstand the decreasing pressure outside would just be..... A space capsule.

Jeff Root
2007-Jul-28, 04:51 AM
Is a bathyscaph or submarine also a space capsule?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

astromark
2007-Jul-28, 11:31 AM
Yes, if its outside Earths atmosphere it could be described as a space capsule. Getting it there might be another issue. As a point of difference I sagest that a satellite is not a space capsule unless it has a pressurized interior. The pressure bulkhead is the defining point. IMHO.

mugaliens
2007-Jul-30, 02:39 AM
Helium is not "anti-gravity" - it is simply lighter than air and makes the ballon less dense than the same volume of air. The ballon will not go into space, it will reach a point where it is no longer less dense than the stuff around it.

Given the fact that LOE (even intersteller space) is not a perfect vaccuum, and given an infinately thin but strong (lightweight) balloon material, and given that the helium would be reduced to match external pressure, yes, such a balloon would be carried up by the Earth's atmosphere to the point where solar winds would blow it out of Earth's orbit.

Practically, no such material exists.

In actuality, the Earth is constantly loosing atmosphere to space due to solar winds blowing off the upper reaches.