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Paracelsus
2007-Jul-30, 10:28 PM
I was looking at one of my back molars this evening and saw a bit of food stuck in the middle of one after I'd already brushed my teeth. Had to brush the heck out of it to get the food particle out. When I finally got it clean, I saw what looked like a tiny hole on the grinding surface of the molar in question.

I have a dentist's appt coming up.


Urgghh. :(

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-30, 10:29 PM
Another grooming thread. :lol:

Van Rijn
2007-Jul-31, 03:20 AM
Well, I've recently had a couple of dental implants and a root canal. It will be some time before I can tell how well the dental implants have turned out. It takes three months for the bone to build up around the titanium screw. Then you get the crown.

Noclevername
2007-Jul-31, 03:31 AM
I'm not looking forward to my tooth-related issues, I need to see an oral surgeon and get my back teeth removed. The furthest-back molars came in facing forward instead of upward, and they've pushed all the other teeth together, top and bottom. Not looking forward to that, but it's got to be done sometime.

publius
2007-Jul-31, 03:34 AM
Well, I've recently had a couple of dental implants and a root canal. It will be some time before I can tell how well the dental implants have turned out. It takes three months for the bone to build up around the titanium screw. Then you get the crown.


I've got a couple of implants that anchor a bridge. They've done pretty darn well. It feels sort of strange until you get used to it. You're used to feeling in your teeth with pressure and chewing. With the implants, you just get pressure on the bone and it will feel strange until you get used to it.

What happenned with me was I had the bridge filling a gap, and one of the anchors just broke off underneath, which put stress on the other one which broke off as well (it was over an upper eye tooth which takes a lot of stress). So, it was either a partial or implant time. The old bridge wouldn't work and a new one had to be made. That gets expensive.

Like I tell my dentist, I need the novacaine more when he gives me the bill than when he's grinding. :lol:

-Richard

galaxygirl
2007-Jul-31, 04:22 AM
Sorry to hear about the cavity. I had my first cavity around 2 years ago and was nervous about getting it filled, so I asked a friend I was working with at the time what it was like and she told me "you know those guys who are always drilling holes on the side of the highway... it's like that but on your teeth." Let's just say that she didn't really help settle my nerves. Honestly, it isn't anything like that and if you do have a cavity, fillings don't hurt at all.

I went to the dentist about a week ago and he told me that I'm going to have to get my wisdom teeth out probably sometime this winter. I am sooo scared beyond belief because I've never had anything like this done before. Just the thought of being knocked out, having my teeth being dug out from under my gums, and waking up with gaping holes in my mouth while being in tons of pain gets me a little freaked out. As you can probably tell I'm a total pain wimp who is afraid of any type of medical/dental procedure. For those of you familiar with this type of thing, do you reccomend local anesthesia or being completely out?

Van Rijn
2007-Jul-31, 05:34 AM
Sorry to hear about the cavity. I had my first cavity around 2 years ago and was nervous about getting it filled, so I asked a friend I was working with at the time what it was like and she told me "you know those guys who are always drilling holes on the side of the highway... it's like that but on your teeth." Let's just say that she didn't really help settle my nerves. Honestly, it isn't anything like that and if you do have a cavity, fillings don't hurt at all.


Heh. My father never had cavities, but my mother lost all her teeth by the time she was an adult. My teeth are kind of in between - I still have most of them, but I had metal fillings in more than half my teeth by the time I was 20. Sometimes, dental work does hurt - some nerves are harder to block than others.



I went to the dentist about a week ago and he told me that I'm going to have to get my wisdom teeth out probably sometime this winter. I am sooo scared beyond belief because I've never had anything like this done before. Just the thought of being knocked out, having my teeth being dug out from under my gums, and waking up with gaping holes in my mouth while being in tons of pain gets me a little freaked out. As you can probably tell I'm a total pain wimp who is afraid of any type of medical/dental procedure. For those of you familiar with this type of thing, do you reccomend local anesthesia or being completely out?

Ask your doctor. Are they impacted? How many are you going to have removed? Does he think a local will effectively block the nerves?

I had four impacted wisdom teeth removed at one time, and I had conscious sedation. That isn't as extreme as general sedation, but I didn't remember the procedure. I didn't have much pain at all until a couple days afterwards, when the bruised tissue decided it wanted to let me know it wasn't happy. For all that, it wasn't that bad - an ache, but nothing compared to, for instance, an abscessed tooth. The biggest danger is dry socket, which I haven't had, but I've heard can be very painful, so it's important to follow instructions and allow the socket to heal properly.

Van Rijn
2007-Jul-31, 05:38 AM
What happenned with me was I had the bridge filling a gap, and one of the anchors just broke off underneath, which put stress on the other one which broke off as well (it was over an upper eye tooth which takes a lot of stress). So, it was either a partial or implant time. The old bridge wouldn't work and a new one had to be made. That gets expensive.

Like I tell my dentist, I need the novacaine more when he gives me the bill than when he's grinding. :lol:

-Richard

It sure does! I have dental insurance, but they don't cover implants. One spot could have been handled with a bridge (which is covered) but since I was doing one implant I decided to go ahead with the other. Ah, well. I'll be happy as long as it works.

sarongsong
2007-Jul-31, 07:28 AM
...As you can probably tell I'm a total pain wimp...Me, too! and I've even convinced the dental hygienist to crank up the (optional) nitrous to "10" when cleaning. http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

suntrack2
2007-Jul-31, 06:01 PM
in some cases gingivitis may also occur if the problem persists in the gum swelling and having a cavity over there. the dentist can easily do a skelling(please check the correct spelling for this word) :) and later they remove the plack at the sight by driving a very small roter on the teeths to remove the plack. In only one seating the problem will remove.

and Hey I am not a dentist. :)

sunil

Paracelsus
2007-Jul-31, 06:23 PM
Well, that tooth with the little hole hurts a bit.

Ugh, I see drilling in my future...:(


I went to the dentist about a week ago and he told me that I'm going to have to get my wisdom teeth out probably sometime this winter. I am sooo scared beyond belief because I've never had anything like this done before. Just the thought of being knocked out, having my teeth being dug out from under my gums, and waking up with gaping holes in my mouth while being in tons of pain gets me a little freaked out. As you can probably tell I'm a total pain wimp who is afraid of any type of medical/dental procedure. For those of you familiar with this type of thing, do you reccomend local anesthesia or being completely out?


Galaxygirl, I had local with sedation when I had my wisdom teeth out. I didn't feel any pain, but I was treated to a long, involved convo between my oral surgeon and his assistant RE his golf game and the foibles of his golf buddies--all while he was yanking my head around trying to get my teeth out. It was a very odd experience all the way around. :lol:

I'd recommend the above. Local won't be enough, and general is a little much, IMHO, as there are always risks to general anesthesia.

Trebuchet
2007-Jul-31, 06:33 PM
Ugh. Reading this is causing the tooth I broke Saturday to hurt. I can't get into the dentist until Thursday. Probably another crown coming.

I think they're called "wisdom teeth" because when you get them, you wise up to the fact that you'd have been better off if you didn't. Mine were lying flat on their sides and were removed in two separate procedures, a few months apart. For the first ones, uppers, they laid me out flat and numbed it up good. I was lying there with my eyes closed and could just feel scraping. Finally I decided to open my eyes just in time to see a hammer descending onto the chisel the dentist was using to break up the tooth, since it couldn't be extracted in one piece. It felt like it was going to come out the back of my skull.

For those with the upcoming extractions, sorry!

publius
2007-Aug-01, 05:17 AM
I had to have 4 wisdom yanked out (with a crowbar, most likely) back in Dec. 2005 at age 39. They had developed cysts, which will eat into the bone and weaken it, and there's a small risk of it becoming cancerous.

I made the decision not to have them pulled, which turned out to be wrong. If the suckers never erupt, partial eruptions are the ones that cause problems, they can be left in there and never cause any trouble at all. However, if they do cause trouble, it will most likely be later on in life, and the risk of complications are much higher. It's best to have them yanked no later than the early 20s. The bone is still "green" and it's much easier.

So that's the choice. Take 'em out early or take the chance.

Me, as the oral surgeon put it, I'm tough as nails and mine healed up as fast as he's ever seen, he said. And he was worried about it. My jaw swelled up like some cartoon caricature (peaks about 3 days afterwards, and boy is it something).

I went under general. The oral surgeon said that considering the shape of those teeth and the work he was going to have to do to get them out, there was no other option. He wouldn't do it without putting me under. And he did. Conscious time just stops. Inhale the gas looking at the clock and it's 12:00PM as you close your eyes and next thing you see is another wall clock saying 3:00PM, and then you realize your mouth is packed full of stuff... :lol:

-Richard

suntrack2
2007-Aug-01, 09:07 AM
there are several interesting examples about toothaches. patient 1. doctor please remove my teeth without showing it to me, 2nd one: doctor there is a great swelling and a plaque problem occured in the right upper second teeth in mouth, doctor ask him are you a doctor of teeths! 3rd one, oooooooh, don't remove harshly my teeth doctor ( by snatching the doctor's hand) :)

4th one: doctor please remove all my teeths, they are giving me accute trouble, doctor, ooohoo, don't think that, I am for you, now just do a aaaa..
(doctor use a giant driller in the teeths, later the suferer shout, oh, doctor, what are you doing!! ) .

paracelsus, your topic is nice one.

sunil

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-01, 01:26 PM
Why, thank you, Sunil! :)

I'll try to console myself with that thought while my dentist is grinding away. ;)

mugaliens
2007-Aug-01, 06:36 PM
Another grooming thread. :lol:

And with already eaten mouth food, to boot.

Dragon Star
2007-Aug-02, 12:05 AM
I actually had the rare event in which I had problems with fillings. As they drilled out my cavities, I experienced pain practically the entire time (sensation of freezing). To get my back teeth done, took 7 shots of Novocaine and two disgruntled dentists to get me numbed enough to bear the pain. They say I have some sort of thing that instead of having two nerves per tooth, I have four.

I still have more work to be done. Damn. :(

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-02, 12:15 AM
I think I have a zit.

galaxygirl
2007-Aug-02, 03:51 AM
Ask your doctor. Are they impacted? How many are you going to have removed? Does he think a local will effectively block the nerves?


I have to get four removed and they're all impacted. I'm going to meet with the oral surgeon later this month to get more x-rays done and to go over the procedure.


Paracelsus: was it a bit unnerving hearing and knowing what was going on as the surgeon was pulling out your teeth?


Richard: Did it really take 3 hours to get all four of them out?

publius
2007-Aug-02, 04:38 AM
Richard: Did it really take 3 hours to get all four of them out?

It was 3 hours from the time I went under until the time I woke up. "Missing time" there indeed as it seemed as though I just closed my eyes and then opened them. It took me a while to come back to, but you can figure a good 2 hours of surgery.

But that was for me, nearly 40 years old with hard bone, and all four of them buried deeply in that bone, and with cysts around them (well, 3 of them, I think). He had to section them to avoid cutting out too much bone. What that means is he cuts a little hole in the bone down to the tooth, then cuts the tooth in smaller pieces which he could get out through the hole.

All of that is why it took over 2 hours. In your case, with nice soft green bone, it won't be so much trouble if all goes well.

And remember this is your decision. If the teeth stay buried, it's possible they would never give you any trouble. But then they might, and it's much easier with less risk of complication if removed when you're young. It's a judgement call. Some dentists think they should always be removed. Some don't.

However, if the teeth are trying to erupt or look like they will soon, then it is indeed best to get them out. A partially erupted wisdom tooth will be nothing but trouble. It will let food an bacteria get underneath your gums and not only eat it up and the bone around, but can get into the adjacent molar and its socket.

If you're squeamish about working on your teeth, and don't like the sound and feel of all that drilling and grinding, or rather intimidating looking tools going in your mouth and the elbow greases required to use them somtime, best to go with general anesthesia.

If you're not squeamish, you might could stand it with local. But only the dentist and surgeon can really give you the best advice about that, knowing exactly how much elbow grease they might have to apply. :)

-Richard

publius
2007-Aug-02, 05:10 AM
GalaxyGirl,

I'd advise to Google up on wisdom teeth and the practice of "prophylactic extraction", that is taking them out just to prevent any future problems. Something called the Cochrane Collaboration, which does a bunch of reviews of clinical trial data, did a report on this in 2006. Their conclusion was it didn't do anything one way or the other. It didn't seem to really help, but didn't really hurt either. Since it doesn't help, some other outfits have said it shouldn't be done.

This goes contrary to the opinions of a lot of dentists. But the data seem to indicate there is no benefit to having them removed.

Now, this asymptomatic impacted wisdom teeth mind you. Symptomatic teeth, those giving you trouble, should indeed be removed.

-Richard

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-02, 07:22 AM
I have to get four removed and they're all impacted. I'm going to meet with the oral surgeon later this month to get more x-rays done and to go over the procedure.


Paracelsus: was it a bit unnerving hearing and knowing what was going on as the surgeon was pulling out your teeth?


Richard: Did it really take 3 hours to get all four of them out?

I was too zonked from the sedation to care that much, really. I was 16 when I had my wisdom teeth removed, so they didn't have to apply as much 'elbow grease' on me as they did on publius. ;)

Tuscon Tim: I'm sorry to hear about your zit. Looks like it's time to introduce the acne angle into this thread (rubs hands together and chuckles wickedly). :razz:

:lol::lol:

Michael Noonan
2007-Aug-02, 07:32 AM
The main thing is know your level of discomfort and make sure you trust your dentist. I went in and got an x-ray and apparently five were inflamed under the teeth.

Since none hurt at the time and I was a bit broke too my dentist said come back when they hurt. A year later for a checkup still five with clear infection under them no change, no pain.

Some people seem not to react as much as others. That was three years ago. I must go back some time. But hey I look like Shrek with matching teeth. The body is an amazing thing.

Best of luck and relax. Just don't take it too far, I was woken up by loud snoring (mine). :)

Trebuchet
2007-Aug-02, 06:58 PM
I don't think I'd be messing around with a known infection just because the tooth doesn't hurt. That infection could be spreading around your body and causing other symptoms the dentist wouldn't necessarily recognize.

Last year I was having chronic sinus difficulty. The doctor asked me "Do your teeth hurt?" They did, a bit, so I went to the dentist. I had an infected root on an upper molar and needed a root canal. The end of that root was less than a millimeter from the sinus. The sinuses are much better now.

By the way, the broken tooth I mentioned earlier turned out to be just the porcelain broken off an old crown. I still need to get it replaced, though.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Aug-02, 08:21 PM
Make sure to let us know when you get a sliver.

And boils too. I like to be notified of boils. Especially the really big ones that ooze puss for a couple weeks - I think they are properly called a carbuncle.





(This is where the smiley goes except that they are blocked here at the factory).

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-02, 10:07 PM
Make sure to let us know when you get a sliver.

And boils too. I like to be notified of boils. Especially the really big ones that ooze puss for a couple weeks - I think they are properly called a carbuncle.





(This is where the smiley goes except that they are blocked here at the factory).

Yeah, I will, thanks, along with any blisters, splinters, hangnails, corns on my toes, etc :sick:

:lol:

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-02, 11:21 PM
Yeah, I will, thanks, along with any blisters, splinters, hangnails, corns on my toes, etc :sick:

:lol:

Please don't. :hand:

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-03, 10:02 AM
:p

suntrack2
2007-Aug-03, 02:49 PM
GalaxyGirl,

I'd advise to Google up on wisdom teeth and the practice of "prophylactic extraction", that is taking them out just to prevent any future problems. Something called the Cochrane Collaboration, which does a bunch of reviews of clinical trial data, did a report on this in 2006. Their conclusion was it didn't do anything one way or the other. It didn't seem to really help, but didn't really hurt either. Since it doesn't help, some other outfits have said it shouldn't be done.

This goes contrary to the opinions of a lot of dentists. But the data seem to indicate there is no benefit to having them removed.

Now, this asymptomatic impacted wisdom teeth mind you. Symptomatic teeth, those giving you trouble, should indeed be removed.

-Richard

when I had been to a dentist some 8 years ago, to remove the teeth, the dentist was suggested me that Hey, sunil, do not remove teeth, now do a "root canaling", I immediately ask the Mr. Dentist that what is the definition of root canaling, they replied that they do a very small operation:( later they implant a silver or a special metal (not iron) :) in the root of the teeth where swelling and infection exists, then they call again and again to look into that root canal, only to see that whether it is "cooked properly" (sorry, fit properly or not), and later they suggest that do not eat a dry and solid food atleast for some days, then they (means that dentist) give the final certificate of "successful root canal in the teeth). I think they make a seperate way to save the teeth from its root!! is it not. I think taking multiple x-rays of teeth is not proper one, because if the rediation reach at the root of the teeth then in such case tooth will automatically displace from its place? ( :)

sunil (please read the above para as a fun only, except the advise of root canaling)

publiusr
2007-Aug-10, 10:16 PM
My blood pressure is too high for them to do anything.