PDA

View Full Version : Foot and Mouth disease in the UK



Sticks
2007-Aug-04, 05:50 AM
It's back (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/6930684.stm)

:(

The UK countryside is now effectively closed.

More news as we get it

01101001
2007-Aug-04, 06:09 AM
It's back (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/6930684.stm)

Seeing as how many are probably as unaware as I am of the former appearance, I provide, from Wikipedia Foot-and-mouth disease (http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot-and-mouth_disease):


Most European countries have been recognized as free, and countries belonging to the European Union have stopped FMD vaccination; however, in 2001, a serious outbreak of FMD in Britain resulted in the slaughter of many animals, the cancellation of many sporting events and leisure activities such as Ten Tors and the postponing of the general election for a month.

In depth: Wikipedia 2001 United Kingdom foot-and-mouth crisis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2001_United_Kingdom_foot-and-mouth_crisis)

JohnD
2007-Aug-04, 09:11 AM
Thanks, Sticks, you have blown what remains of the summer tourist season for visitors from the US!

First, the countryside is NOT "closed". That was a desperate measure, when DEFRA (Dept for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) and the Government, by extraordinary slow action, let the outbreak get away from control in 2001.

This time, there has been an immediate, national stop on ALL movement of cattle and other farm animals that can carry the disease, that they took a lot longer to impose last time. That let infected animals be carried the length of the country, and we hope won't happen this time. Hope.

As Stick's link to the Wiki mentions, last time vaccination was not used thanks to pressure from the farming lobby, who were simultaneously loudest in complaining at the injustice of the slaughter of animals. It is widely used in Europe, where FMD is endemic, but not epidemic. Let us hope (again) that this and the lessons of 2001 have been learnt .

Oh, and if you planned to come to the UK on holiday, don't worry. Humans can't catch it, if they do stop the outbreak this time you will be able to visit the places you want to see, though you may have to drive/walk through disinfectant troughs, and I understand that disposal of carcasses will not involve massive pyres this time.

John
(From Cumbria, the epicentre of 2001)

WaxRubiks
2007-Aug-04, 09:37 AM
yes we wont make you go through the decontamination process too many times.


http://www.schardt.org/kaltramps/folks/WaterBoy.jpg

Sticks
2007-Aug-04, 09:42 AM
Thanks, Sticks, you have blown what remains of the summer tourist season for visitors from the US!


Better the tourism industry suffer than means of food production. If a number of tourist related industries go under, so be it.

When it is over, if there is a market, others will fill it in time.

This is a highly contagious animal disease, and it is possible for a human to contract it (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1293094.stm)

Last time we had to close all public footpaths to help contain it, and for two months I was actually seconded to the DEFRA station at Kenton Bar to assist with the Disease Emergency Control Centre.

Better safe than sorry.

Dr Nigel
2007-Aug-04, 09:51 AM
Actually, Sticks, you might have that the wrong way round. I'm not sure of the figures, but I think tourism contributes more to our GDP than the rearing of livestock. It's probably worth checking before you make that claim.

And, since the movement of livestock was halted immediately this time, the countryside (except in the exclusion zone) has not been closed the way it was in 2001.

Thus, tourism should be able to proceed as normal, unless we discover outbreaks outside the exclusion zone. Only then will more widespread measures be required.

Also, while your link suggests that humans can contract FMDV infection, it should be pointed out that this is a rare event. It is principally a disease of ungulates (Note: knowledge of taxonomy a bit weak and fuzzily-remembered; please feel free to provide correction if this is wrong).

Sticks
2007-Aug-04, 08:39 PM
Actually, Sticks, you might have that the wrong way round. I'm not sure of the figures, but I think tourism contributes more to our GDP than the rearing of livestock.

Even if that is so, production of food is more strategic than tourism to national survival. (Remember all those football pitches dug up for dig for victory in WWII?)

Priority should always be food production even if the GDP is not as high as tourism.

Michael Noonan
2007-Aug-05, 12:07 AM
Even if that is so, production of food is more strategic than tourism to national survival. (Remember all those football pitches dug up for dig for victory in WWII?)

Priority should always be food production even if the GDP is not as high as tourism.

You have raised a very valid point here. I was looking at Wiki and one of the carriers is the rat. It is important to maintain FMD free without vaccination status for the export market.

So a quick containment of this incident shouldn't cause any major disruption because the intervention was very early.

As a future preventive how about a rat and hedgehog inoculation program as they are not a food source, that shouldn't invalidate FMD free without vaccination that is the highest priority for export markets. article here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot-and-mouth_disease)

01101001
2007-Aug-05, 06:38 AM
Could it be that the British have shot themselves in the foot... and mouth?

BBC: Foot-and-mouth strain identified (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6931639.stm)


The strain in infected cattle is identical to that used at the Institute for Animal Health, at Pirbright, about three miles from the farm.
[...]
An urgent assessment of biosecurity has begun at the institute.

The strain is not one normally found in animals but is used in vaccine production and in diagnostic laboratories.

WaxRubiks
2007-Aug-05, 07:00 AM
Even if that is so, production of food is more strategic than tourism to national survival. (Remember all those football pitches dug up for dig for victory in WWII?)

Priority should always be food production even if the GDP is not as high as tourism.


believe it or not but, it is possible to live without eating meat and even egg and dairy.

quite frankly, if you don't eat tofu, I don't know how you are getting enough protein.:D

djellison
2007-Aug-05, 03:20 PM
The UK countryside is now effectively closed.



"The National Farmers Union (NFU) in the North West said: "As far as members of the public are concerned, we want to be very clear that at this moment in time in 2007 it is a very different situation and the countryside is still open for them."

Don't make up stuff please. At no point has the countryside been declared closed. Stick to the facts. You should be ashamed of scaremongering like that.

Doug

JohnD
2007-Aug-05, 10:50 PM
Sticks,
I'm sorry, you're getting flamed here, but 'the means of food production'?
FMD is highly contagious, but rarely fatal to animals and is very, very hard for humans to catch, even if you eat the anaimal. Animals that catch FMD and survive - most of them - may have their growth impaired and not be as valuable when sold for meat or breeding. Worse, they or their products are unsalable outside thieir own country. But countries where it is endemic are not deprived of meat products.

Rats? Rats don't travel far. Deer are a more worrying species, as they can travel long distances and are difficult to shoot.

John

Michael Noonan
2007-Aug-23, 04:34 PM
Sticks,
I'm sorry, you're getting flamed here, but 'the means of food production'?
FMD is highly contagious, but rarely fatal to animals and is very, very hard for humans to catch, even if you eat the animal. Animals that catch FMD and survive - most of them - may have their growth impaired and not be as valuable when sold for meat or breeding. Worse, they or their products are unsalable outside their own country. But countries where it is endemic are not deprived of meat products.

Rats? Rats don't travel far. Deer are a more worrying species, as they can travel long distances and are difficult to shoot.

John

I don't know much about hedgehogs but I think Enid Blyton fans adore them.

Sticks I'm with JohnD on this not wanting to flame you but it did get me to thinking about how do you get rid of rats. After some consideration this is what I came up with, I hope it helps.

Rats are a different issue. They are a vector creature which means build the right vector and you know where they will go.

Sort of like the Pied Piper but this time you lay pipes. Plenty of feeding points to encourage flow and gates but not doors. If you close a door they panic but if a gate to a loop back in the general direction of their nest is made they will more likely choose that.

Sort of like setting a trail of honey to encourage ants away from the nest. When the rats near the collection point they are already in pipes way too strong to permit escape. A one way leap to the last food source and they are in the trap. The next idea is a bit fiddly, a small detail so to speak.

Instead of doing them in use a tranquillizer and get the males to deliver a nasty dose back into the rat infested area. Put a bit of radioactive lead in their pencil so to speak. Short half life for safety. Rats are extremely tolerant to radiation but if a male rat delivered the isotope to the right place then that may just be enough to damage the breeding population still left behind in the city.

There was an estimate in any city in the world you are not more than 10 units (I haven't found the article whether it was feet or metres) from the nearest rat. This article is about rat bite statistics 1991 to 1994. Article found at "aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/148/1/78.pdf".

The live with us but prefer to avoid us. If we gave them their own comfortable expressways they may prefer to use them. Lastly just in case the little op puts them off so to speak one could always find what the trigger for such desire is in the cane toad.

True it may prove more than a little unpleasant for the odd (bad pun) garden gnome but when considering the public health sacrifices are called for.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-24, 11:45 AM
There's been a serious outbreak of foot 'n mouth disease here in the US for the last few years.

Fortunately it's been confined to the Washington, DC area.

Ivan Viehoff
2007-Aug-24, 12:33 PM
There was an estimate in any city in the world you are not more than 10 units (I haven't found the article whether it was feet or metres) from the nearest rat.
Urban legend. Not enough rats.

UK 2007 F&M crisis now over.

Ivan Viehoff
2007-Aug-24, 12:35 PM
There's been a serious outbreak of foot 'n mouth disease here in the US for the last few years.

Fortunately it's been confined to the Washington, DC area.
The Duke of Edinburgh once described himself as an expert dontopodologist.

Sticks
2007-Aug-24, 12:43 PM
UK 2007 F&M crisis now over.

Not quite

A few movement restrictions have been relaxed, that is all.

BigDon
2007-Aug-24, 12:57 PM
Micheal, a old method at rodent control I read about was to produce a "homicidal" cannibalistic super rat. Capture and confine about 20 mature males and provide them with just water. Wait until there is one left. It's most often the biggest. Condition it back up to health and release.

You now have an insane cannibal rat. (Rats, like other mammels, can be driven insane) It kills the other rats and you just have to deal with one. Supposedly used to clear hunting lodges and other such structures back in the 1800's

Never done it myself so don't be mean to me.

Argos
2007-Aug-24, 01:16 PM
Better the tourism industry suffer than means of food production. If a number of tourist related industries go under, so be it.


Hmmm, I´d guess the tourist industry in Britain is one order of magnitude larger than cattle farming [thus, more imkportant]. You can always import cheap beef.

Neverfly
2007-Aug-24, 01:19 PM
No, it completely makes sense.

Humanity is a known selfish coward, killing hypocritacly anything in abundance that it considers a threat. Zero respect for life. None. If it isnt human, it's life has no real value. It may as well be a rock.

Sharks. Mountain lions. Cows...
10 million cows wasted. Culled and incinerated.
Over a disease that I'm as likely to get as getting hit by a falling airplane.

Such is "civilization"

Disgusting.

pilgrim
2007-Aug-24, 01:31 PM
Micheal, a old method at rodent control I read about was to produce a "homicidal" cannibalistic super rat. Capture and confine about 20 mature males and provide them with just water. Wait until there is one left. It's most often the biggest. Condition it back up to health and release.

You now have an insane cannibal rat. (Rats, like other mammels, can be driven insane) It kills the other rats and you just have to deal with one. Supposedly used to clear hunting lodges and other such structures back in the 1800's

Never done it myself so don't be mean to me.

That's what they were talking about doing at an undisclosed telescope in US (not going to name names:lol:). Apparently the rats kept chewing through the camera photomultiplier tube wires, virtually wracking most of the field of view of camera. They never actually did it as far as I know. It was more a question of venting frustration when they were about to start a session and found their equipment had been half eaten by rodents.

Michael Noonan
2007-Aug-24, 04:39 PM
Cheers BigDon and pilgrim,

I am not a mean person so your all entirely safe. It was more an exercise of thought and thanks Ivan Viehoff and Maksutov I am pleased the issue isn't as big as I thought it was.

One thing I would be worried about breeding a super rat more dangerous all round than one that needed a quick fix of Viagra for short term effect only.

:whistle: The pipes and plans were becoming way to elaborate but hey it was fun, and now for a bit of :silenced:

BigDon
2007-Aug-24, 10:50 PM
No, it completely makes sense.

Humanity is a known selfish coward, killing hypocritacly anything in abundance that it considers a threat. Zero respect for life. None. If it isnt human, it's life has no real value. It may as well be a rock.

Sharks. Mountain lions. Cows...
10 million cows wasted. Culled and incinerated.
Over a disease that I'm as likely to get as getting hit by a falling airplane.

Such is "civilization"

Disgusting.

Is that number right? I wouldn't have thought there were ten million cows in all of Britain.

Neverfly
2007-Aug-25, 05:22 AM
Is that number right? I wouldn't have thought there were ten million cows in all of Britain.

Not anymore:whistle:

Thos figures are from the Linky that Fred gave, however, I think they either refer to a grand total or the previous outbreak.

Either way it's outrageous.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-25, 08:52 AM
Is that number right? I wouldn't have thought there were ten million cows in all of Britain.How many humans live in Guernsey, as opposed to the primary residents?

Reminds of the Bill Cosby routine (a la Hud).
Cow 1: Where we going?
Cow 2: Into that trench.
Cow 1: What's gonna happen in there?
Cow 2: They're gonna shoot us.
Cow 1: Huh? Why they gonna shoot us?
Cow 2: 'Cause we got hoof 'n' mouth.
Cow 1: What's hoof 'n' mouth?
Cow 2: See that foam ‘round yer mouth? That’s hoof 'n' mouth.
Cow 1: Anything I can do about it?
Cow 2: Yeah...wipe that foam from aroun’ yer mouth.

BigDon
2007-Aug-25, 10:28 AM
I remember that one Mak. In the sixties and seventies my family made an event ouy of Bill Cosby's record releases. Mom would buy the album and we would have a special dinner then when we were done all listen to his comedy.
Ah yes the classic punch lines:

What's he doing now?
Eatin' bushes

I forgot I was behind him.

Faster faster you fool you fool

So we all went to jail handcuffed at the thigh

My favorite skits will always be Go Carts, The Ninth Street Bridge, and that one with the game where they jump on each other. (The first introduction of Fat Albert)

Sticks
2007-Sep-05, 12:45 PM
We interupt this frivolity to bring you a news flash

From BBC News Online (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6979891.stm)


Probes into last month's foot-and-mouth outbreak in Surrey have found the virus was in a pipe on the nearby Pirbright laboratory site, the BBC has learned.

The Health and Safety Executive found lapses in biosecurity at the site.

Virus traces were found in a pipe running from the Merial pharmaceutical firm to a treatment plant operated by a government-run lab on the same complex.

It is believed the pipe may have been damaged by tree roots before flooding pushed the traces to the surface.

Michael Noonan
2007-Sep-06, 03:58 AM
We interupt this frivolity to bring you a news flash

From BBC News Online

Probes into last month's foot-and-mouth outbreak in Surrey have found the virus was in a pipe on the nearby Pirbright laboratory site, the BBC has learned.

The Health and Safety Executive found lapses in biosecurity at the site.

Virus traces were found in a pipe running from the Merial pharmaceutical firm to a treatment plant operated by a government-run lab on the same complex.

It is believed the pipe may have been damaged by tree roots before flooding pushed the traces to the surface.

(http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6979891.stm)

Oh great a security leak, you know this will be in the conspiracy section before too much longer ... just kidding (well it does have the right ingredients for muck raking ... hmm ... nah)