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Swift
2007-Aug-06, 04:49 PM
Seems time to start the obligatory launch and mission thread.
From NASA.gov:

STS-118 Launch Countdown is Under Way
Launch Date: Aug. 8
Launch Time: 6:36 p.m. EDT

08.06.07 - 10:45 a.m. EDT
With two days remaining until launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour, work is progressing smoothly, launch officials stated this morning during a briefing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

"Work continues to go well," said NASA Test Director Jeff Spaulding. "At this point, we are on schedule and are tracking no significant issues."

The countdown began on time at 8 p.m. EDT Sunday.

....
Weather is not expected to stand in the way of a Wednesday evening liftoff. Currently, there's only a 30% chance that isolated showers or anvil clouds could prevent launch. This prediction remains the same in the event of a 24-hour delay.

01101001
2007-Aug-06, 06:06 PM
Live NASA TV Video & Countdown Clock, KSC, Shuttle (http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/cdt/) (Java)

4 video windows, 30-second refresh: KSC weather, launch pad, what looks to be NASA TV, and (Java) countdown clock.

From Shuttle Countdown Status Home Page (http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cdt_main.pl)

Lukas
2007-Aug-07, 01:42 AM
If everything goes as planned, when will Endeavour dock with the ISS?

thanks.

01101001
2007-Aug-07, 04:18 AM
If everything goes as planned, when will Endeavour dock with the ISS?

I saw (the press kit (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/182728main_STS-118_Press_Kit.pdf), PDF 12 MB) that docking happens day 3 of the mission, but they didn't provide a detailed timeline.


NASA STS-118 Mission Information (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts118/index.html)

NASA Shuttle Launch (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/index.html)


Orbiter: Endeavour
Mission: Space Station Assembly Mission 13A.1
Primary Payload: S5 Truss
Launch Date: August 8
Launch Time: 6:36:39 p.m. EDT
Launch Window: 10 minutes
Launch Pad: 39A
Landing Site: Kennedy Space Center
Inclination/Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

Launch 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, 2236 UTC

Lukas
2007-Aug-07, 06:45 AM
Thanks for the link to the press kit (just downloaded it.. looks very interesting).
I was trying to figure out whether it would be possible for me to see shuttle and iss close together from my location (using iss parameters in "heavens above"), so it would have to be shortly before docking or after undocking.
I missed that on the last shuttle mission.

Do you know when the times of these events will be determined and published?

Swift
2007-Aug-07, 01:56 PM
I suspect shortly after launch. By then they will know the detail of the shuttle's intercept. Heavens Above may also have the information after the launch.

I saw the Shuttle and the ISS shortly after the last seperation. It is definitely worth seeing if you can.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-07, 04:15 PM
From the launch page

[qoute]On the morning before the scheduled liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour on the STS-118 mission, launch officials confirmed once again that the countdown is continuing as planned and no issues have surfaced.

Shuttle Weather Officer Kathy Winters provided an updated forecast, which has improved even further to only a 20% chance that isolated rain showers could prohibit launch on Wednesday afternoon.[/quote]

schlaugh
2007-Aug-07, 04:50 PM
I suspect shortly after launch. By then they will know the detail of the shuttle's intercept. Heavens Above may also have the information after the launch.

Heavens Above has been pretty swift in posting the information on both the shuttle and ISS, and then providing just the ISS details once they have docked since the shuttle will raise the station's altitude and they in effect become one object.

And yeah, it's mighty cool to see one trailing the other through the evening sky. I've seen that twice now but it doesn't look likely for this trip (in my area) unless NASA delays the flight.

01101001
2007-Aug-07, 06:58 PM
Do you know when the times of these events will be determined and published?

I was just hunting and saw a resource I've never seen before -- not that I'm much of a Shuttle/ISS follower. CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html) has a wealth of information, some more detailed than I've encountered at NASA sites.

For instance, STS 118 Flight Plan (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/118/118flightplan.html), has schedules of the flight plan (certainly expected to be flexible and not writ in stone, and hopefully updated as it changes):


[Oh, darn, it's a GIF file so I can't paste the docking schedule here. Physical docking is day 3, August 10, 1:51 PM Eastern (presumably daylight) Time. Rendezvous events happen several hours earlier -- but I don't know when first rendezvous is, because there are rendezvous events, firings, the first two days.]

schlaugh
2007-Aug-07, 08:13 PM
STS-118 Day 3 Schedule (Eastern Time Zone)

Eastern Time..............DD HH MM
08/10/07 Fri 07:37 AM 01 13 00 ISS crew wakeup
08/10/07 Fri 08:07 AM 01 13 30 STS crew wakeup
08/10/07 Fri 09:02 AM 01 14 25 Group B computer powerup
08/10/07 Fri 09:17 AM 01 14 40 Begin rendezvous timeline
08/10/07 Fri 09:42 AM 01 15 05 NC4 rendezvous rocket firing
08/10/07 Fri 11:17 AM 01 16 40 Spacehab prepped for docking
08/10/07 Fri 11:13 AM 01 16 36 TI rendezvous rocket firing
08/10/07 Fri 12:17 PM 01 17 40 Spacesuits removed from airlock
08/10/07 Fri 01:17 PM 01 18 40 Rendezvous pitch maneuver
08/10/07 Fri 01:22 PM 01 18 45 Approach timeline begins
08/10/07 Fri 01:51 PM 01 19 14 Docking
08/10/07 Fri 03:02 PM 01 20 25 Leak checks
08/10/07 Fri 03:02 PM 01 20 25 Post-rendezvous laptop reconfig
08/10/07 Fri 03:32 PM 01 20 55 Airlock prepped for ingress
08/10/07 Fri 03:42 PM 01 21 05 Group B computer powerdown
08/10/07 Fri 04:02 PM 01 21 25 SRMS grapples S5
08/10/07 Fri 04:07 PM 01 21 30 Hatch opening
08/10/07 Fri 04:17 PM 01 21 40 Spacehab post-docking reconfig
08/10/07 Fri 04:17 PM 01 21 40 SRMS unberths S5
08/10/07 Fri 04:47 PM 01 22 10 Welcome aboard!
08/10/07 Fri 04:52 PM 01 22 15 Safety briefing
08/10/07 Fri 05:17 PM 01 22 40 SSRMS moves to pre-grapple position
08/10/07 Fri 05:37 PM 01 23 00 SRMS maneuvers
08/10/07 Fri 06:07 PM 01 23 30 SSRMS grapples S5
08/10/07 Fri 06:22 PM 01 23 45 SRMS ungrapples S5
08/10/07 Fri 06:22 PM 01 23 45 Equipment lock prep
08/10/07 Fri 06:37 PM 02 00 00 Station-to-shuttle power transfer system activated
08/10/07 Fri 06:52 PM 02 00 15 REBA checkout
08/10/07 Fri 07:07 PM 02 00 30 EVA tools transferred to ISS
08/10/07 Fri 07:27 PM 02 00 50 EVA-1: Tools prepped
08/10/07 Fri 08:07 PM 02 01 30 EVA-1: Procedures review
08/10/07 Fri 10:32 PM 02 03 55 EVA-1: Mask pre-breathe
08/10/07 Fri 11:17 PM 02 04 40 EVA-1: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
08/10/07 Fri 11:37 PM 02 05 00 ISS crew sleep begins

01101001
2007-Aug-07, 10:36 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
1 Days 00 Hours 00 Minutes 00 Seconds

Useful links:
Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts118/launch/launch-blog.html) (active 6 hours before launch)
Countdown 101 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/countdown101.html) (now T-11 hours and holding)

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 02:51 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)


It's launch day at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where Space Shuttle Endeavour and her crew of seven astronauts are undergoing final preparations for the STS-118 mission to the International Space Station.

Endeavour's orange external tank is being loaded with 500,000 gallons of liquid oxygen and hydrogen. This process, called "tanking," takes about three hours to complete. The propellant levels in the tank will be continuously "topped off" during the remainder of today's countdown.

All systems onboard the space shuttle are functioning normally this morning, and there's only a 20 percent chance of weather prohibiting a liftoff at 6:36 p.m. EDT.


Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 07 Hours 45 Minutes 00 Seconds

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 03:34 PM
And just so everyone knows, live television coverage has started (actually started about 3 hours ago).

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 03:42 PM
T-3 hours and holding (built in 3 hour hold)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 03:54 PM
More information can be found on the spaceflightnow.com launch blog (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html). I like them because they update faster then NASA.


T-minus 3 hours and holding. The countdown has gone into the next planned hold in the timeline. This hold is scheduled to last three hours. Endeavour's precise launch time is targeting for 6:36:42 p.m.

Everything is looking good right now, with no significant technical problems being reported and forecasters giving a positive weather outlook today.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 05:10 PM
The lethargic NASA Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts118/launch/launch-blog.html):


[12:44 EDT] Spain's Zaragoza and Moron landing sites are favorable while the site at Istres, France is not.

Wow. Spain has a landing site for Morons?

NASA Facts: Moron Air Base, Spain (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/nasafact/talspain.htm)


The Moron Air Base is a joint-use U.S. Air Force and Spanish Air Force Base and was designated a TAL site in 1984. Moron Air Base serves as a weather alternate for both low and high inclination launches.
The Moron AB is located about 35 miles southeast of Seville and 75 miles northeast of Naval Station Rota.

Morón?

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 05:36 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 05 Hours 00 Minutes 00 Seconds

===

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


02:06 PM......Final crew weather briefing
02:16 PM......Astronauts don pressure suits
02:41 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 3 hours)

02:46 PM......Astronauts depart crew quarters
03:16 PM......Crew reaches launch pad; begins strapping in
04:06 PM......Astronaut communications checks
04:21 PM......Hatch closure
05:16 PM......White room closeout

Laguna
2007-Aug-08, 05:38 PM
Morón de la Frontera, Andalucía, Spain

Airbase Coordinates:
37°10'36.71"N 5°36'41.70"W

ozprof
2007-Aug-08, 06:02 PM
Hi all,

Not sure who has seen this little piece on the NASA website, but I found it quite interesting. It helps put something personal into the launch today.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/campion_essay_070808.html

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 06:05 PM
Morón de la Frontera, Andalucía

Great, Google translator gives me:


Morón of the Border, Andalusia

Oh... morón: hillock, mound

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 06:08 PM
And here I thought a large flat expanse would be the best place to land one of those things.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 07:00 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 03 Hours 36 Minutes 00 Seconds

===

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


03:16 PM......Crew reaches launch pad; begins strapping in
04:06 PM......Astronaut communications checks
04:21 PM......Hatch closure
05:16 PM......White room closeout

05:21 PM......Begin 10-minute built-in hold (T-minus 20m)
05:31 PM......NASA test director countdown briefing
05:31 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 20m)

05:32 PM......Backup flight computer to OPS 1 software
05:36 PM......KSC area clear to launch

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 07:14 PM
Commander Scott Kelly is now in his seat and getting strapped in.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 07:46 PM
Chance of weather delaying the launch now reduced to 10%.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-08, 07:48 PM
Chance of weather delaying the launch now reduced to 10%.

Great!

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 08:00 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)


The 22nd flight to the International Space Station, STS-118 will be the first flight for Endeavour since 2002. Launch remains on target for Aug. 8 at 6:36 p.m. EDT.

Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 02 Hours 36 Minutes 00 Seconds

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 08:21 PM
White Room closeout has started.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 08:27 PM
White Room closeout has started.

Have they announced the blood-acohol level readings yet?

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 08:31 PM
Have they announced the blood-acohol level readings yet?

All on board are thoroughly sloshed.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 08:31 PM
Hatch is closed.

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 08:36 PM
Ack, finally. I was getting really tired of staring at the back of Thing 7's head.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 08:47 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 01 Hours 50 Minutes 00 Seconds

===

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


05:16 PM......White room closeout

05:21 PM......Begin 10-minute built-in hold (T-minus 20m)
05:31 PM......NASA test director countdown briefing
05:31 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 20m)

05:32 PM......Backup flight computer to OPS 1 software
05:36 PM......KSC area clear to launch

05:42 PM......Begin final built-in hold (T-minus 9m)
06:12 PM......NASA test director launch status verification
06:27:42 PM...Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)

Doing hatch closure recycle. Switches not indicating closure.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:00 PM
hatch closed...again.

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 09:01 PM
How come Thing 2 gets to wear a black hat?

(I'm talking about the video feed, btw.)

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:04 PM
How come Thing 2 gets to wear a black hat?

Is that the young guy holding the air ventilation hose?

It's probably a hat of shame that marks him as a peon of some sort, rookie, intern, hoser.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:06 PM
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 01 Hours 30 Minutes 00 Seconds

90 Minutes

Edit: Still working the hatch.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:07 PM
A quick google search didn't yield any white room protocol or procedures, so I dunno if the hat color is significant or not.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:08 PM
Small crack in the foam on the LOX feed line. No risk of debris. Issue considered resolved.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:10 PM
Hm, is that the hatch handle back on the door?

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 09:10 PM
It's probably a hat of shame that marks him as a peon of some sort, rookie, intern, hoser.

Hoser. :lol:

My guess is it's to shame him for showing up to work sober.

The Supreme Canuck
2007-Aug-08, 09:12 PM
Hoser? No, that's Dave Williams.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:17 PM
Hm, is that the hatch handle back on the door?

Working the hatch closure switches. Got two extra technicians on board at the moment checking from the inside. Maybe they'll let them out when it's resolved.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:18 PM
Haha I see. I was in a meeting and didn't see they had techs onboard :)

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:22 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 01 Hours 15 Minutes 00 Seconds

75 Minutes

Hatch closed. Again.

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
NASA Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts118/launch/launch-blog.html)
SpaceflightNow Launch Blog (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)

T-20 and holding for 10.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:22 PM
T-20 mins and holding (10 minute planned hold)

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 09:22 PM
Does proceeding to the built-in hold mean they have the hatch fixed?

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:23 PM
From Spaceflightnow.com


The shuttle's crew compartment hatch is confirmed to be closed and latched for flight.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:24 PM
Does proceeding to the built-in hold mean they have the hatch fixed?

The hold would have taken place anyway. What would happen is if they had a problem with the hatch they would not come out of the hold and resumed the countdown.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:28 PM
Hatch is fixed. Switches OK. Checking pressure.

NASA Launch Blog


5:23 p.m. - Good news: The launch team has verified that Endeavour's crew access hatch is closed. With this issue behind us, cabin leak checks are under way.

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 09:29 PM
The hold would have taken place anyway. What would happen is if they had a problem with the hatch they would not come out of the hold and resumed the countdown.

Makes sense. Thanks!

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:31 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up (times EDT):


05:31 PM......Resume countdown (T-minus 20m)

05:32 PM......Backup flight computer to OPS 1 software
05:36 PM......KSC area clear to launch

05:42 PM......Begin final built-in hold (T-minus 9m)
06:12 PM......NASA test director launch status verification
06:27:42 PM...Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)

06:29:12 PM...Orbiter access arm retraction
06:31:42 PM...Launch window opens
06:31:42 PM...Hydraulic power system (APU) start
06:31:47 PM...Terminate liquid oxygen replenish

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:31 PM
t-20 mins and counting.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:32 PM
RTLS (return to launch site) cleared of all chance of showers.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:36 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Launch Countdown:
0 Days 01 Hours 00 Minutes 00 Seconds

60 Minutes

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:43 PM
T-9 and holding (41 min, 52 second planned hold)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:45 PM
Or I guess they said 45 mins, not 41?

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:45 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

Weather still go for launch.

50 Minutes

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:49 PM
Or I guess they said 45 mins, not 41?

Yep. SpaceflightNow:


T-minus 9 minutes and holding. Countdown clocks have gone into the planned 45-minute, 42-second built-in hold. Today's launch remains set for 6:36:42 p.m. EDT. There are technical problems being worked and weather is still "go" for launch.

Edit: NASA Blog disagrees:


5:42 p.m. - T-9 minutes and holding. This is the final built-in hold and will last 41 minutes, 52 seconds. At this point, the countdown is running on time and launch is on track for 6:36 p.m.

Edit: I think descrepancy is that target launch time is not same as open window. Don't know who to believe at the moment. (T-whatever arithmetic is confusing, but target launch time hasn't moved.)

NASA Blog:
Today's launch window opens at 6:32:52 p.m. and closes at 6:43:46 p.m., and the preferred launch time comes in the middle of the window at 6:36:42 p.m.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 09:52 PM
There are technical problems being worked ...

Do we know what problems are being worked?

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 09:59 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

36 Minutes

===

Haven't heard the tech issue being worked.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:04 PM
Haven't heard the tech issue being worked.

probably a typo...meant to say NO technical issues being worked or something.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:06 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

30 Minutes

===

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

Coming up, it gets busy:


06:12 PM......NASA test director launch status verification
06:27:42 PM...Resume countdown (T-minus 9m)

06:29:12 PM...Orbiter access arm retraction
06:31:42 PM...Launch window opens
06:31:42 PM...Hydraulic power system (APU) start
06:31:47 PM...Terminate liquid oxygen replenish
06:32:42 PM...Purge sequence 4 hydraulic test
06:32:42 PM...Inertial measurement units to launch mode
06:32:47 PM...Aerosurface movement check
06:33:12 PM...Main engine steering test
06:33:47 PM...Oxygen tank pressurization
06:34:07 PM...Fuel cells to internal reactants
06:34:12 PM...Clear caution-and-warning memory
06:34:42 PM...Crew closes visors
06:34:45 PM...Hydrogen tank pressurization
06:35:52 PM...Solid-fuel booster joint heater deactivation
06:36:11 PM...Shuttle computers take control of countdown
06:36:21 PM...Booster steering test
06:36:35 PM...Main engine start
06:36:42 PM...Booster ignition/launch

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
NASA Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts118/launch/launch-blog.html)
NASA Shuttle Mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Edit: 11 minutes after: all 3 TAL sites weather go.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:16 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

20 Minutes

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:21 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

15 Minutes

BA Blog Twittering (http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2007/08/08/shuttle-launch-live-twittering/)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:24 PM
Final poll of the controllers.

BAUT is GO

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:25 PM
Polling. Go... Go... Go...

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:26 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

10 Minutes

Go to launch

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:26 PM
From spaceflight


The final readiness poll by the NASA test director confirms there are no technical issues being addressed. The Range also reports "go" on the local weather. And Mission Control is ready for the flight.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:28 PM
T-9 minutes and counting.

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-08, 10:28 PM
The countdown has resumed

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:28 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

8 Minutes

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:31 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

5 Minutes

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:31 PM
Whiteroom retracted

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:32 PM
APU start, terminating LOX replenishment

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:33 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

3 Minutes

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:34 PM
Gimbal check complete

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:35 PM
Vent arm retract

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:35 PM
Launch Time:
2236 UTC, 1836 EDT, 1536 PDT, August 8

2 Minutes

Visors down, suit O2

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:37 PM
onboard computers in charge

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:37 PM
Launch Time:
2237 UTC, 1837 EDT, 1537 PDT, August 8

30 Seconds

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-08, 10:37 PM
When was the last time they showed a launch live on broadcast TV?

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:37 PM
liftoff

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:38 PM
Coming up:

..............ASCENT EVENTS

06:36:53 PM...T+00:11...Start roll maneuver (927 mph)
06:37:00 PM...T+00:18...End roll maneuver (1,002 mph)
06:37:15 PM...T+00:33...Main engine throttle down (1,214 mph)
06:37:27 PM...T+00:45...Main engine throttle up (1,384 mph)
06:37:42 PM...T+01:00...Maximum aerodynamic pressure (1,616 mph)
06:38:46 PM...T+02:04...Booster separation (3,655 mph)
06:38:56 PM...T+02:14...Start OMS rocket assist (3,750 mph)
06:39:16 PM...T+02:34...Trans-Atlantic abort option available (3,955 mph)
06:40:35 PM...T+03:53...Negative return to KSC (5,591 mph)
06:41:45 PM...T+05:03...Abort to orbit option available (7,364 mph)
06:42:28 PM...T+05:46...Shuttle rolls heads up (9,001 mph)
06:42:56 PM...T+06:14...Press to MECO (10,024 mph)
06:44:03 PM...T+07:21...3G limiting (13,706 mph)
06:45:04 PM...T+08:22...Main engine cutoff (17,524 mph)

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:39 PM
2 minutes

all good

booster sep

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:39 PM
SRB Sep

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:41 PM
Negative return

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:42 PM
5 Minutes into flight

Coming up:

06:41:45 PM...T+05:03...Abort to orbit option available (7,364 mph)
06:42:28 PM...T+05:46...Shuttle rolls heads up (9,001 mph)
06:42:56 PM...T+06:14...Press to MECO (10,024 mph)
06:44:03 PM...T+07:21...3G limiting (13,706 mph)
06:45:04 PM...T+08:22...Main engine cutoff (17,524 mph)

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-08, 10:42 PM
Orbit is achievable

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:42 PM
Press to ATO

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-08, 10:43 PM
shuttle is rolling

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:43 PM
Roll complete

cjl
2007-Aug-08, 10:44 PM
Looks great right now :D

Over 11,000 mph
66 miles up
1,100 miles downrange :)
90 seconds left in engine burn

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:45 PM
8 Minutes in

Coming up:

06:45:04 PM...T+08:22...Main engine cutoff (17,524 mph)

..............ON-ORBIT EVENTS

07:14:00 PM...OMS-2 orbit circularization rocket firing
09:07:00 PM...Spacehab activation
09:07:00 PM...Laptop computer network setup
09:32:00 PM...NC1 rendezvous rocket firing

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:46 PM
MECO. Way to go Endevour :)

cjl
2007-Aug-08, 10:46 PM
MECO and fuel tank separation :D

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-08, 10:46 PM
Orbit is achieved, I believe

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:46 PM
"Class is in session."

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:47 PM
Gives me chills every time I watch one of those :)

nauthiz
2007-Aug-08, 10:48 PM
Ditto.

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 10:49 PM
Yow.

Thanks for sharing eyeballs, everyone.

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/170421main_118_launch.jpg

VPCCD
2007-Aug-08, 10:51 PM
You know, I don't care how much you may dislike the shuttle....
It's FREAKIN cool that we can send somone from earth into space, just like that!! It's things like this that make me think there still is hope for humanity.

The Supreme Canuck
2007-Aug-08, 10:52 PM
This is the first time I've watched a launch since they put the camera on the tank. That is mighty cool to watch.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:53 PM
Heh, yea it takes me longer to drive to the grocery store then it takes the STS to get into orbit.

The Supreme Canuck
2007-Aug-08, 10:55 PM
Frankly, I'm jealous you guys can afford such things.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 10:57 PM
Launch replays starting now

Merlin5
2007-Aug-08, 11:11 PM
Hi just joined. :)

Great launch, was watching it from T minus 9 minutes ( and holding for about 45 minutes ).

Thank god for nasa tv. I've watched pretty much all the launches since STS121 last summer. I followed the complete STS 121 mission on nasa tv for 2 weeks it was fascinating. By the way, is there some reason why the mission numbers went from STS 121 down to STS 115 and then started keeping consecutive numbering, ie, STS 116, STS 117, STS 118?

Also, how come it takes over a day to meet with the ISS? Is it because they're both travelling at 17.5K miles per hour that it takes hours before they finally catch up with each other?

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 11:15 PM
OMS 2 burn in progress

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 11:16 PM
Google Maps aerial view Launchpad 39A (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode&ie=UTF8&ll=28.608159,-80.604002&spn=0.001029,0.002666&t=k&z=19&om=1)

Look, it's empty!

Play shuttle pilot and zoom out.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 11:19 PM
Hi just joined. :)

Welcome aboard :)




By the way, is there some reason why the mission numbers went from STS 121 down to STS 115 and then started keeping consecutive numbering, ie, STS 116, STS 117, STS 118?

From this NASA site (http://enterfiringroom.ksc.nasa.gov/funFactsSTSNumbers.htm)


[. . .], you've noticed that launches don't always go when they've been scheduled to lift off. Between weather delays, technical glitches, and a host of other issues, missions are often postponed, schedules are shuffled, and we end up with flights going "out of order". Even rocket science has problems that can't always be resolved neatly!

01101001
2007-Aug-08, 11:19 PM
By the way, is there some reason why the mission numbers went from STS 121 down to STS 115 and then started keeping consecutive numbering, ie, STS 116, STS 117, STS 118?

Welcome.

Wikipedia: List of space shuttle missions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_space_shuttle_missions)


After the Challenger disaster, a sequential numbering system was restored, with the number according to counting from the beginning, although, unlike the initial system, the assignment of numbers is based on the initial schedule and may not reflect launch order.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 11:20 PM
OMS 2 burn was good.

Merlin5
2007-Aug-08, 11:23 PM
Thank you for that info, now I know!

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-08, 11:30 PM
Also, how come it takes over a day to meet with the ISS? Is it because they're both travelling at 17.5K miles per hour that it takes hours before they finally catch up with each other?

Essentially, it's becasue they're pretty busy. FD1 (flight day 1) is taken up with making sure the onboard systems are working, getting things organized. FD2 is taken up with the tile inspection and stuff. Then FD3 is reserved for the docking phase. Also, like you said, they're 2 spacecraft driving around at 17,500 mph, you want to make the approach nice and slow so you don't use a lot of fuel on a "miss" :)

Merlin5
2007-Aug-08, 11:39 PM
Essentially, it's becasue they're pretty busy. FD1 (flight day 1) is taken up with making sure the onboard systems are working, getting things organized. FD2 is taken up with the tile inspection and stuff. Then FD3 is reserved for the docking phase. Also, like you said, they're 2 spacecraft driving around at 17,500 mph, you want to make the approach nice and slow so you don't use a lot of fuel on a "miss" :)

Thanks. It's incredible how NASA organises these missions and makes every operation absolutely pixel perfect so to speak. Never ceases to amaze me.
At that very moment of lift off, my heart skips a beat and I think to myself, they've done so many checks and re-checks, yet for some inexplicable reason, that rocket might just fall over. Thank goodness it didn't, and I don't like to sound pessimistic, but that's what always goes through my mind.

01101001
2007-Aug-09, 06:37 AM
Shh. The crew is asleep.

Wake-up in 6 hours, 8:37 EDT.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-09, 07:18 AM
Shh. The crew is asleep.

Wake-up in 6 hours, 8:37 EDT.

Too early. That's only 5:37 my time and I don't get to work until 8:00.

Then again, that means I will probably just miss out on wake-up activities.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2007-Aug-09, 10:45 AM
anyone else notice some foam popping-off right around/shortly after srb sep.? It seemed to come off the top of the tank....I recorded it and watched it a couple of times....didn't seem to hit anything.

01101001
2007-Aug-09, 01:39 PM
From CBS News Space Place STS-118 Quick-Look Background (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/currentglance.html)

Flight Day 2 NASA TV Schedule


.................................................. ..........mission time...EDT...UTC

10...ENDEAVOUR CREW WAKE UP (FD 2).........00/14:00...08:36 AM...12:36
12...RMS GRAPPLE & UNBERTH OF OBSS.........00/16:45...11:21 AM...15:21
12...OBSS STARBOARD WING SURVEY............00/17:45...12:21 PM...16:21
12...EMU CHECK OUT.................................00/17:50...12:26 PM...16:26
14...NOSE CAP SURVEY..............................00/19:40...02:16 PM...18:16
15...OBSS PORT WING SURVEY....................00/20:40...03:16 PM...19:16
16...OBSS BERTH.......................................00/22:55...05:31 PM...21:31
16...MISSION STATUS BRIEFING...................00/23:24...06:00 PM...22:00
16...OMS POD SURVEY................................00/23:35...06:11 PM...22:11
16...CENTERLINE CAMERA INSTALLATION........01/00:00...06:36 PM...22:36
17...ODS RING EXTENSION...........................01/00:30...07:06 PM...23:06
17...RENDEZVOUS TOOLS CHECK OUT BEGINS.....01/00:30...07:06 PM...23:06
18...CREW CHOICE DOWNLINK OPPORTUNITY......01/01:40...08:16 PM...00:16
20...ENDEAVOUR CREW SLEEP BEGINS...........01/05:00...11:36 PM...03:36

A lot of self-examination.

Hamlet
2007-Aug-09, 01:49 PM
anyone else notice some foam popping-off right around/shortly after srb sep.? It seemed to come off the top of the tank....I recorded it and watched it a couple of times....didn't seem to hit anything.

Bill Gerstenmaier mentioned this in the post-launch press conference. His preliminary assessment was that there was no problem. The foam came off well after 95 seconds into the flight. After this time the atmospheric density is low enough not to cause a significant slowdown of foam debris. He said, of course, that they will do their normal evaluation of all the flight imagery and telemetry data.

Dave J
2007-Aug-09, 03:05 PM
Hi just joined. :)


Also, how come it takes over a day to meet with the ISS? Is it because they're both travelling at 17.5K miles per hour that it takes hours before they finally catch up with each other?

On the last flight, the ISS was almost 3/4 of an orbit ahead of the Shuttle, southeast of Australia, at launch. This time, the ISS was just ahead, NE of Nova Scotia. They set up an initial orbit that will get them to the ISS in a couple of days. In the first case, it was a lower, faster orbit with pretty significant closure. Yesterday, their initial orbit was higher (tho still lower than ISS) for a slower closure.
They have a lot of stuff to do before rendezvous...TPS checkout, docking mechanism prep, getting the Orbiter set up for the mission...
Then they tweak the orbit as they close, for closure rate and inclination/node alignments, and press on in.
Orbital mechanics are strange sometimes, but very fun.

01101001
2007-Aug-09, 04:50 PM
Orbital mechanics are strange sometimes, but very fun.

Not if I were driving. Ahhh!

That SpaceflightNow STS118 status page (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html) has some closure details (that -- was it? -- Merlin5 might appreciate):


[1420 GMT, 1020 EDT] Early today, the shuttle was trailing the international space station by 1,242 miles, closing the gap at about 160 miles per 90-minute orbit. Two rendezvous rocket firings are planned today to fine tune Endeavour's ongoing rendezvous and if all goes well, commander Scott Kelly will guide the shuttle to a linkup with the lab complex around 1:54 p.m. Friday.

Friday docking events, SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/070809fd2pre/), excerpts from flight plan, EDT and mission-elapsed (DD..HH..MM) times:

12:14 PM...01...17...37...Range: 10,000 feet
12:23 PM...01...17...46...Range: 5,000 feet
12:29 PM...01...17...52...Range: 3,000 feet
12:37 PM...01...18...00...Range: 1,500 feet
12:42 PM...01...18...05...Range: 1,000 feet
12:46 PM...01...18...09...Shuttle directly below ISS
12:51 PM...01...18...14...Range: 600 feet
01:16 PM...01...18...39...Range: 300 feet
01:20 PM...01...18...43...Range: 250 feet
01:24 PM...01...18...47...Range: 200 feet
01:27 PM...01...18...50...Range: 170 feet
01:28 PM...01...18...51...Range: 150 feet
01:32 PM...01...18...55...Range: 100 feet
01:35 PM...01...18...58...Range: 75 feet
01:40 PM...01...19...03...Range: 50 feet
01:43 PM...01...19...06...Range: 30 feet; start station keeping
01:52 PM...01...19...15...Range: 10 feet
01:54 PM...01...19...17...DOCKING

01101001
2007-Aug-09, 04:53 PM
Shh. The crew is asleep.

Maybe they weren't.

SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)


[1420 GMT] The astronauts were awakened during their sleep period earlier today when an alarm sounded because of apparent low pressure in one of the five liquid oxygen tanks in the shuttle's fuel cell system. Flight controllers initially thought the alarm was the result of an instrumentation problem, but they now suspect the pressure controller for oxygen tank No. 5 has failed.

Dave J
2007-Aug-09, 05:19 PM
Further investigation seems to indicate they'll be manually regulating Tank 5 for the duration, or until they deplete it.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-09, 07:46 PM
Maybe they weren't.

SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)

[1420 GMT] The astronauts were awakened during their sleep period earlier today when an alarm sounded because of apparent low pressure in one of the five liquid oxygen tanks in the shuttle's fuel cell system. Flight controllers initially thought the alarm was the result of an instrumentation problem, but they now suspect the pressure controller for oxygen tank No. 5 has failed.

The PAO is saying it's the O2 Tank 2 (cue ominous music) pressure controller, 1 of 5 such controllers.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-10, 06:03 PM
From spaceflightnow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)


CONTACT AND CAPTURE! Endeavour has arrived at the space station to install the Starboard 5 truss segment and an external spare parts platform, plus transfer a couple tons of supplies and equipment.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-10, 06:06 PM
CONTACT AND CAPTURE! Endeavour has arrived at the space station to install the Starboard 5 truss segment and an external spare parts platform, plus transfer a couple tons of supplies and equipment.



Booze? (Just kidding :) )

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-10, 06:23 PM
Booze? (Just kidding :) )

Well the blog entry from spaceflight goes on to say

The opening of hatches between the station and shuttle is expected in about 90 minutes. That will be followed by a welcoming ceremony and safety briefing.

how can you have a ceremony without booze??

Back on topic, retraction complete, hooks closed. We have hard dock.

Swift
2007-Aug-10, 08:15 PM
Booze? (Just kidding :) )
Maybe not. 2000 article from CNN.com (http://archives.cnn.com/2000/TECH/space/11/03/living.in.space/index.html)

What about wine with dinner?

"Not in the U.S. program," said Vickie Kloeris of NASA's Space Station Food Systems.

What about the Russian program? Cosmonauts toasted with vodka on Mir.

"I have yet to get somebody to officially admit that they take it yet we know it's there," Kloeris said.

01101001
2007-Aug-10, 09:39 PM
NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Mission Elapsed Time
1 Days 23 Hours 00 Minutes 00 Seconds

Are they having just a little bit too much fun?
5992

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Now playing: mission status briefing:

Moved the truss out of the bay. Activated the Station-to-Shuttle Power Transfer System. Spotted a ding in a tile near a wheel well, possibly a small ice hit (first thought to be foam). Will decide in days IF a repair is necessary. But, the press bit into it like a pit bull and shook the life out of it.

SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html):
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf) (PDF)

Coming up:


08/10/07 Fri 07:27 PM 02 00 50 EVA-1: Tools prepped
08/10/07 Fri 08:07 PM 02 01 30 EVA-1: Procedures review

Miller time!


08/10/07 Fri 10:32 PM 02 03 55 EVA-1: Mask pre-breathe
08/10/07 Fri 11:17 PM 02 04 40 EVA-1: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
08/10/07 Fri 11:37 PM 02 05 00 ISS crew sleep begins

Flight Day 4

08/11/07 Sat 12:07 AM 02 05 30 STS crew sleep begin
08/11/07 Sat 08:07 AM 02 13 30 STS/ISS crew wakeup
08/11/07 Sat 08:47 AM 02 14 10 EVA-1: 14.7 psi repress
08/11/07 Sat 09:07 AM 02 14 30 EVA-1: Hygiene break
08/11/07 Sat 09:32 AM 02 14 55 EVA-1: Crew lock depress to 10.2 psi
08/11/07 Sat 09:57 AM 02 15 20 EVA-1: Campout EVA preps
08/11/07 Sat 11:27 AM 02 16 50 EVA-1: Spacesuit purge
08/11/07 Sat 11:27 AM 02 16 50 SSPTS shut down for EVA-1
08/11/07 Sat 11:42 AM 02 17 05 EVA-1: Spacesuit prebreathe
08/11/07 Sat 12:32 PM 02 17 55 EVA-1: Crew lock depressurization
08/11/07 Sat 12:37 PM 02 18 00 SSRMS to pre-install position
08/11/07 Sat 01:07 PM 02 18 30 EVA-1: Airlock egress
08/11/07 Sat 01:22 PM 02 18 45 SSRMS support
08/11/07 Sat 01:22 PM 02 18 45 EVA-1: Sortie setup
08/11/07 Sat 01:52 PM 02 19 15 EVA-1: S4/S5 launch lock removal
08/11/07 Sat 02:27 PM 02 19 50 SVA-1: S5 installation

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html) (just to round out this handy collection of links)

Yodaluver28
2007-Aug-11, 12:42 AM
Uh oh. Looks like some tiles got damaged after all. Ice this time.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/08/10/tech/main3155075.shtml

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 12:47 AM
Uh oh. Looks like some tiles got damaged after all. Ice this time.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/08/10/tech/main3155075.shtml

They'll look at. Look at it some more. Ponder it. Decide, maybe, to fix it. Maybe not.


"What does this mean? I don't know at this point," said John Shannon, chairman of the mission management team.

Dave J
2007-Aug-11, 03:02 AM
STS27R came home with a belly that looked like it had been blasted with a shotgun, per Hoot Gibson, it's commander.
They'll do a good scan of it, inclunding with the laser sensor to get a good 3D look at the gouge. They'll apply the new heating calculation programs and figure out the best course. They have time to work it thoroughly.
We just gotta wait and let them do their job.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-11, 05:33 AM
Went to happy hour after work so didn't see. Did they hold the press conference for this already?

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 05:48 AM
Went to happy hour after work so didn't see. Did they hold the press conference for this already?

They spent more than enough time on it during the Mission Status Briefing (noted in passing above), this afternoon. It honestly didn't seem like a big deal as described -- a few pictures, a 3 square inch white blem of unknown depth -- but the reporters went into a frenzy. Well, not that bad, but they asked many more questions than it warranted, especially after the statement that not enough is known and it will be studied. But, they just kept picking at it. Frustrating.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-11, 06:01 AM
That's one of my biggest annoyances when watching those press conferences.

NASA: We can't say anything else until we look into it. We WILL let you know.
Reporter: Well how bad is it?
NASA: We don't know yet. We need to look into.
Reporter: Well what will they have to do to fix it?
NASA: We don't know yet. We need to look into it.
Reporter: So are saying they're all going to die on reentry?
NASA: No. We're saying we need to look into it.
Reporter: So you're saying there is nothing wrong, and they are going to come home without fixing it.
NASA: No, were saying we need to look into it.
Reporter: Well how bad is it?
NASA: *sigh*


you just want to get up and yell "Guys! We don't know anything about it yet. Shut up about it already! WE WILL TELL YOU WHEN WE KNOW!!" (insert profanity as desired)

Dave J
2007-Aug-11, 06:30 AM
I kinda wish Mr Griffin had been there...he's not a politician, and would have told them in so many words that they just need to shut up and wait for the real story, instead of creating their own to sell on their broadcasts/websites...

I like Mike...kinda the Harry Truman of spaceflight. Unfortunately, today's political environment doesn't tolerate such blunt honesty.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-11, 08:12 AM
Yea I agree, Griffin does a good job. I like the way he answers questions (like when he addressed the drunk astronaut question on launch day).

I liked when Wayne Hale would run the conferences too. He was patient, but would eventually decide it was time to move on and stop accepting questions regarding whatever subject the media hounds were obsessing about.

Daryl71
2007-Aug-11, 02:06 PM
you just want to get up and yell "Guys! We don't know anything about it yet. Shut up about it already! WE WILL TELL YOU WHEN WE KNOW!!" (insert profanity as desired)

It's almost like the entire press corp consists entirely of clones of my brother-in-law. You know, the kind of people who, when watching a movie that no one in the room has ever seen, demands to know what's going to happen next and why certain characters are behaving the way they are. :wall:

Maksutov
2007-Aug-11, 02:21 PM
I had neighbors who would invite us over for Thanksgiving dinner almost every year. The husband would then view the one football game he would watch all year, Dallas versus somebody.

Invariably there would be a pass play where the QB would hit the receiver on the numbers, and the receiver would drop the ball. At that point Rocky would ask "Why did he drop the ball?", to which I'd reply "Because he didn't catch it." Rocky would then say "Don't these guys get paid a lot of money to catch the ball? You'd think the least he could do would be to catch it."

And so it would go for the entire game. "What's 'lined up offsides'?" "It means he was over the line of scrimmage when he got into his stance and when the ball was snapped." "How come that guy wasn't in the right place? Can't he see the lines on the field?"

Etc.

Meanwhile it's great that they actually inspect the thermal protection system now once in orbit, rather than how it was done previously, i.e., fly blind and wave a rabbit's foot.

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 05:09 PM
It's 1309 EDT, 1709 UTC, 1009 PDT.

The flight plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf) calls for:


08/11/07 Sat 01:07 PM 02 18 30 EVA-1: Airlock egress
08/11/07 Sat 01:22 PM 02 18 45 SSRMS support
08/11/07 Sat 01:22 PM 02 18 45 EVA-1: Sortie setup
08/11/07 Sat 01:52 PM 02 19 15 EVA-1: S4/S5 launch lock removal
08/11/07 Sat 02:27 PM 02 19 50 SVA-1: S5 installation
08/11/07 Sat 03:37 PM 02 21 00 SSRMS ungrapples S5
08/11/07 Sat 03:57 PM 02 21 20 EVA-1: PVR grapple fixture relocation
08/11/07 Sat 04:57 PM 02 22 20 EVA-1: Get ahead tasks
08/11/07 Sat 05:12 PM 02 22 35 EVA-1: S5 cleanup
08/11/07 Sat 05:47 PM 02 23 10 EVA-1: P6 forward radiator retraction
08/11/07 Sat 06:57 PM 03 00 20 EVA-1: Payload bay cleanup
08/11/07 Sat 07:12 PM 03 00 35 EVA-1: Airlock ingress
08/11/07 Sat 07:32 PM 03 00 55 EVA-1: Airlock repressurization

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

They might be ahead of schedule, about an hour. They're already out. They're EVA-ing, playing with the truss.

S5 truss is within a foot of S4. After removing some sort of launch locks, then they'll mate 'em up.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-11, 05:25 PM
PAO reports they're about 30 mins ahead.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-11, 05:37 PM
S5 truss is soft-captured to the ISS. Bolting process beginning now.

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 07:51 PM
Still ahead of schedule. I estimate an hour; haven't heard officially. Now performing "get ahead tasks".


08/11/07 Sat 04:57 PM 02 22 20 EVA-1: Get ahead tasks
08/11/07 Sat 05:12 PM 02 22 35 EVA-1: S5 cleanup
08/11/07 Sat 05:47 PM 02 23 10 EVA-1: P6 forward radiator retraction
08/11/07 Sat 06:57 PM 03 00 20 EVA-1: Payload bay cleanup
08/11/07 Sat 07:12 PM 03 00 35 EVA-1: Airlock ingress
08/11/07 Sat 07:32 PM 03 00 55 EVA-1: Airlock repressurization

Coming up in a while, about 90 minutes after end of EVA: a mission status briefing.

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 10:21 PM
The P6 radiator work seems done and they are doing some tool counting (maybe part of the payload bay cleanup) and, since they have time, some more get-ahead tasks.


08/11/07 Sat 05:47 PM 02 23 10 EVA-1: P6 forward radiator retraction
08/11/07 Sat 06:57 PM 03 00 20 EVA-1: Payload bay cleanup
08/11/07 Sat 07:12 PM 03 00 35 EVA-1: Airlock ingress
08/11/07 Sat 07:32 PM 03 00 55 EVA-1: Airlock repressurization
08/11/07 Sat 07:47 PM 03 01 10 Spacesuit servicing
08/11/07 Sat 09:02 PM 03 02 25 Transfer tagup
08/11/07 Sat 09:22 PM 03 02 45 SSPTS re-activated
08/11/07 Sat 11:07 PM 03 04 30 ISS crew sleep begins
08/11/07 Sat 11:37 PM 03 05 00 STS crew sleep begins

Edit, 25 minutes past the hour: PAO: 6 hours into EVA, ahead of timeline, gathering tools, before heading back to airlock.

Command and control computer health: primary shut off (an hour or two ago) and backup took over role, and a 3rd, standby, took over backup role. Still diagnosing reason. No issues.

01101001
2007-Aug-11, 11:23 PM
In the Quest airlock. Have doffed spacesuits. I think I heard total EVA was 6 hours 17 minutes.

Estimate briefing at 1745 PDT, 2045 EDT, 0045 UTC. Haven't heard official time.

CBS News Space Place, Mission Status (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


6:20 PM, 8/11/07, Update: Spacewalk ends; all objectives accomplished

Astronaut Rick Mastracchio and Canadian flier Dave Williams floated back into the space station's Quest airlock, closed the hatch and began repressurizing the module at 6:45 p.m. to wrap up a successful six-hour 17-minute spacewalk. The astronauts accomplished all of their objectives, attaching a new solar array truss segment and latching down a folding radiator on another solar array segment to clear the way for relocation later this year.
[...]
While today's spacewalk was underway, the primary command-and-control computer in the U.S. Destiny lab module unexpectedly shut down. There are three computers in the set and the backup immediately assumed the duties of the primary computer and a third machine that had been on standby was activated and configured for backup duty.

Mission control commentator Kyle Herring said late today engineers were still troubleshooting the problem, but the two operational computers remain healthy and in control of critical station functions.

Edit: Heh. They were discussing the computer. Shannon Walker said it was an Ada exception -- but it wasn't just announced but stopped "like a blue screen of death on PCs".

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 12:25 AM
PAO: Briefing at bottom of the hour. (Edit: top of the hour. They're working on charts.)

Eww. NASA uses funny date formats. Barbara Morgan and ground were going over some torque wrenches in the toolbox, maybe some new ones to replace old ones, and she had an issue with labels. The new one, like, had a different inch-pound range, between actual label and description off some list. She read off serial or part numbers, and they had dates, and the format was like 7/1/07 and 6/28/08, which I presume to be month/day/year.

I'd think that would risk confusing the people from cultures that do it more logically -- not that they aren't smart enough to be able to adapt. They ought use ISO standard 8601 (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601)), though. I like it. It sorts more easily, going, in reading order, from most significant to least significant -- big-endian just like numbers: yyyy-mm-dd

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-12, 01:16 AM
In the Quest airlock. Have doffed spacesuits. I think I heard total EVA was 6 hours 17 minutes.

Estimate briefing at 1745 PDT, 2045 EDT, 0045 UTC. Haven't heard official time.

CBS News Space Place, Mission Status (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)



Edit: Heh. They were discussing the computer. Shannon Walker said it was an Ada exception -- but it wasn't just announced but stopped "like a blue screen of death on PCs".

This ship is kind of glitchy...

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 01:24 AM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Mission status briefing just started.

EVA went well.

Power transfer thingy is working great. Probably recommend 3 day extension of mission.

Command and control computer failed. Backup took over. They are still looking at it.

Wasn't ice for the tile ding. It was foam (maybe pushed by ice growth) off a feed line, bouncing off a strut, into the belly. Got it on two cameras. They'll look at the divot tomorrow, categorize it, analyze it, eventually make a decision. Ding is right over a structural member, a stringer, that would provide some heat-sink effect. That's good. Still need to know depth. Probably will by noon tomorrow.

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 04:25 AM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up:


Flight Day 5 (if focused inspection needed)
08/12/07 Sun 07:37 AM 03 13 00 STS/ISS crew wakeup
08/12/07 Sun 09:52 AM 03 15 15 ISS: BOK-3 computer repair work (5 hours)
08/12/07 Sun 10:07 AM 03 15 30 SRMS moves to OBSS pre-grapple position
08/12/07 Sun 10:17 AM 03 15 40 SSRMS grapples/unberths OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 11:02 AM 03 16 25 SSRMS moves OBSS to handoff position
08/12/07 Sun 11:17 AM 03 16 40 EVA-2: Tools configured
08/12/07 Sun 11:42 AM 03 17 05 SRMS grapples OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 11:52 AM 03 17 15 SSRMS ungrapples OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 12:22 PM 03 17 45 Spacesuit battery charging
08/12/07 Sun 12:37 PM 03 18 00 Focused inspection (if necessary)
08/12/07 Sun 12:37 PM 03 18 00 Logistics transfer operations
08/12/07 Sun 02:37 PM 03 20 00 STS crew meal
08/12/07 Sun 04:07 PM 03 21 30 SSRMS grapples OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 04:07 PM 03 21 30 Equipment lock preps
08/12/07 Sun 04:37 PM 03 22 00 SRMS ungrapples OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 04:37 PM 03 22 00 SAFER checkout
08/12/07 Sun 04:52 PM 03 22 15 SSRMS berths OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 05:22 PM 03 22 45 EVA-2: Tools configured
08/12/07 Sun 05:37 PM 03 23 00 SSRMS releases OBSS
08/12/07 Sun 05:52 PM 03 23 15 EPO transfer and video
08/12/07 Sun 07:07 PM 04 00 30 Transfer tagup
08/12/07 Sun 07:17 PM 04 00 40 EVA-2: Procedures review
08/12/07 Sun 08:17 PM 04 01 40 Walkoff PDGF1 to lab
08/12/07 Sun 09:32 PM 04 02 55 EVA-2: Mask pre-breathe
08/12/07 Sun 10:17 PM 04 03 40 EVA-2: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
08/12/07 Sun 10:37 PM 04 04 00 ISS crew sleep begins
08/12/07 Sun 11:07 PM 04 04 30 STS crew sleep begins

Maksutov
2007-Aug-12, 08:13 AM
PAO: Briefing at bottom of the hour. (Edit: top of the hour. They're working on charts.)

Eww. NASA uses funny date formats. Barbara Morgan and ground were going over some torque wrenches in the toolbox, maybe some new ones to replace old ones, and she had an issue with labels. The new one, like, had a different inch-pound range, between actual label and description off some list. She read off serial or part numbers, and they had dates, and the format was like 7/1/07 and 6/28/08, which I presume to be month/day/year.

I'd think that would risk confusing the people from cultures that do it more logically -- not that they aren't smart enough to be able to adapt. They ought use ISO standard 8601 (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601)), though. I like it. It sorts more easily, going, in reading order, from most significant to least significant -- big-endian just like numbers: yyyy-mm-ddI've been using that for years, even pre-Y2K (anyone remember that?). Among other things, such dates are self-sorting in most computer systems.

Posted 20070812.

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 05:31 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up (they're already into it):


08/12/07 Sun 12:37 PM 03 18 00 Focused inspection

Now we'll get to the bottom of this ding.

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html):

Mission Elapsed Time
3 Days 18 Hours 53 Minutes 00 Seconds

[...]

The STS-118 crew continues to conduct a focused inspection of Space Shuttle Endeavour’s heat shield. Using the shuttle’s robotic arm and 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), the crew is taking a look at five areas on the underside that may have been damaged during the climb to orbit on Aug. 8.

SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html) status:


1630 GMT (12:30 p.m. EDT)

The focused inspections are underway beneath space shuttle Endeavour. The crew just completed scanning the thermal barrier on the right-hand main landing gear door.

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


"Last night we did power cycle it and reconfigured all the computers so they are in a good state for today's operations and everything's back to nominal," said station flight director Heather Rarick. "The main focus (today), especially for the shuttle team, will be to perform the focused inspection of the bottom of the shuttle to review some potential tile damage and see what the extent of that is."

Today's timeline:


12:07 PM...03...17...30...Heat shield inspection begins
12:07 PM...03...17...30...Logistics transfer operations
12:42 PM...03...18...05...Spacesuit battery charging
02:37 PM...03...20...00...Shuttle crew meals begin
03:37 PM...03...21...00...SSRMS grapples OBSS
03:37 PM...03...21...00...Equipment airlock preps for Monday spacewalk
04:07 PM...03...21...30...SRMS ungrapples OBSS
04:07 PM...03...21...30...SAFER emergency jetpack checkout
04:22 PM...03...21...45...SSRMS berths OBSS
04:52 PM...03...22...15...Spacewalk tools configured
05:00 PM...03...22...24...Mission status briefing on NASA TV
05:07 PM...03...22...30...SSRMS releases OBSS
05:27 PM...03...22...50...Educational experiment transfer and video

Oh boy. Educational experiment video. Pay attention, class.


06:32 PM...03...23...55...Logistics transfer tagup
06:47 PM...04...00...10...Spacewalk procedures review
07:47 PM...04...01...10...Station arm walkoff to lab
09:02 PM...04...02...25...EVA-2: Mask pre-breathe
09:47 PM...04...03...10...EVA-2: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
10:07 PM...04...03...30...ISS crew sleep begins
10:37 PM...04...04...00...STS crew sleep begins
12:00 AM...03...05...24...Daily video highlights reel on NASA TV

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-12, 06:54 PM
Focused inspection complete. Beginning stowage of the OBSS. Results will most likely be provided tomorrow as the team needs time to review the data.

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 07:29 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

About June's computer problems (probably not yesterday's):


While today's inspection work was going on, space station commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and flight engineer Oleg Kotov were busy replacing cables attached to a computer processing unit known by the English version of a Russian acronym, BOK-3. In the wake of widespread Russian computer failures in June, engineers discovered quite a bit of corrosion on cables leading to the BOK-3 unit, located near an air conditioner in the Zvezda command module.

Opening access panels today, Yurchikhin reported finding a fair amount of condensation and water in the area. The BOK-3 unit itself will be removed Tuesday and replaced with a freshly delivered spare on Wednesday.

(Yuck. Reminds me a little of totally unrelated Off-Topic Babbling topic dirtyest pc ever seen (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/63287-dirtyest-pc-ever-seen.html).)


Going into the mission, flight planners said if the SSPTS operated as expected, they would recommend extending Endeavour's mission by three days and adding a fourth spacewalk. The SSPTS has been operating flawlessly, delivering some 6 kilowatts of power to the shuttle and allowing the astronauts to reduce the consumption of liquid oxygen and hydrogen used by the ship's fuel cells. As a result, the MMT was expected to approve the mission extension, setting the stage for spacewalks Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

1700 EDT Mission status briefing is in about 90 minutes.

01101001
2007-Aug-12, 09:07 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Mission status briefing has begun.

===

Extended mission by 3 days. 14 days total.

Collected focused inspection data for belly tile ding. Will do analysis today 24 to 48 hours. Don't know yet, still, whether a repair is needed. With 3D data, they can model damaged tile and put it in an arc jet and see what it would do, and also repair model and test that. Very high confidence. Still would feel comfortable de-orbiting if an emergency arose now.

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185865main_sts118_shannon_081207_thum.jpg (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185864main_sts118_shannon_081207.jpg)
Ding (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185864main_sts118_shannon_081207.jpg)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-12, 09:39 PM
http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185865main_sts118_shannon_081207_thum.jpg (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185864main_sts118_shannon_081207.jpg)
Ding (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185864main_sts118_shannon_081207.jpg)

That doesn't look too bad. It will be interesting what, if any, repair work they decide on. It will be a nice test of the procedures.

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 05:24 AM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up:


Flight Day 6
08/13/07 Mon 07:07 AM 04 12 30 STS/ISS crew wakeup
[...]
08/13/07 Mon 10:27 AM 04 15 50 EVA-2: Spacesuit purge
08/13/07 Mon 11:32 AM 04 16 55 EVA-2: Crew lock depressurization
08/13/07 Mon 12:07 PM 04 17 30 EVA-2: Airlock egress

novaderrik
2007-Aug-13, 07:20 AM
i think they will go out an repair it, if only to show the public that they can do things like that- and so the astronauts can play with the cool tools they have on board... then, once it's fixed, all the news outlets will start going on and on about whether or not it will fail on re-entry..
nothing like a little drama to get the public interested..

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 04:02 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

They are out and about for the gyro task.

NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html):


STS-118 astronauts are working outside the International Space Station for the second time during the mission. The objective of today’s spacewalk, which began at 11:32 a.m. EDT, is the replacement of a faulty attitude control gyro on the station.
[...]
Meanwhile, crew members are transferring cargo between Endeavour and the station. Experts on the ground continue to analyze imagery collected Sunday during the STS-118 crew’s focused inspection of five areas of concern on the Endeavour’s heat shield.

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 05:17 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up, afternoon events (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):


12:52 PM...04...18...15...EVA-2: Transfer new CMG to ESP-2
01:37 PM...04...19...00...Crew meals begin
02:22 PM...04...19...45...EVA-2: Remove new CMG from ESP-2
03:12 PM...04...20...35...EVA-2: Install new CMG on Z1 truss
04:07 PM...04...21...30...EVA-2: Install failed CMG on ESP-2
05:17 PM...04...22...40...EVA-2: Payload bay cleanup
05:42 PM...04...23...05...EVA-2: Airlock ingress
06:02 PM...04...23...25...EVA-2: Airlock repressurization
06:17 PM...04...23...40...Spacesuit servicing
06:22 PM...04...23...45...Station arm (SSRMS) walk off lab to PDGF-2
07:30 PM...05...00...54...Mission status briefing on NASA TV
07:37 PM...05...01...00...Transfer tagup
09:37 PM...05...03...00...ISS crew sleep begins
10:07 PM...05...03...30...STS crew sleep begins

NASA TV reports: Russians finished the BOK-3 computer replacement work well ahead of schedule.

Dave J
2007-Aug-13, 05:44 PM
Dave Williams is riding the end of the arm, carrying the CMG in his hands...hold tight, buddy! Someone quipped "remember, this is not a jettison mission".
The arm is about fully extended, he's way out there!

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-13, 06:05 PM
Is the glove check a modern version of the Apollo EMU check? (ie: a verbal cue to tell the astronaut to get a minute of rest without telling the whole world)

pghnative
2007-Aug-13, 06:34 PM
Why all the fuss about a gouge? I was under the impression that in the initial missions, the shuttles lost a fair number of tiles each mission. Certainly losing some tiles is worse than gouging a couple.

Unless of course the location is particularly critical (e.g. the leading edges of wings, which doomed Columbia) --- but the reports I've heard indicate that the gouge isn't in a critical location.

i think they will go out an repair it, if only to show the public that they can do things like that Any chance the repair could worsen the problem? (e.g., they could damage something else while out there --- or maybe the repair could worsen the condition of the gouged tiles if not done correctly)

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 06:41 PM
Any chance the repair could worsen the problem? (e.g., they could damage something else while out there --- or maybe the repair could worsen the condition of the gouged tiles if not done correctly)

I believe I did hear Shannon (chairman of NASA's Mission Management Team) mention that in the last briefing: that having the astronauts and their tools swinging around the tile-coated belly is a risk for further tile damage.

mugaliens
2007-Aug-13, 07:22 PM
I glad they decided to put the reentry vehicle on top of the foam-covered tank for the next design... Sure saves a lot of hassles.

Not sure the media is too happy about it, though - nothing exciting to report: "We lifted off as scheduled, did the scheduled things as scheduled, and returned as scheduled. The ISS was upgraded and everyone's home safe and sound IAW design parameters."

novaderrik
2007-Aug-13, 07:38 PM
are there any pcs of the belly of that one shuttle that cams back with hundreds of dings like this? which shuttle and which mission was that?

Nicolas
2007-Aug-13, 07:57 PM
sts-27, Atlantis orbiter.

picture of landing, revealing some white dings in the black, but no real belly pic. Shows most of the damage though, as the right side is fully in view. (http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/gallery/photo/STS/Small/EC88-0247-1.jpg)

HUGE!!! version (warning: 3000*1500 jpg) (http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/gallery/photo/STS/Large/EC88-0247-1.jpg)

As you can see, even the right wheel bay door was damaged in a corner.

Damage was due to right SRB insulation falling onto the orbiter.

They saw some of the damage in flight and sent pics to the ground, but these were low res and as NASA couldn't see the damage on them, they said it was OK. Also a turbopump cracked in that flight btw, but that's a different story.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-13, 07:59 PM
They tested the connections on the new Control Moment Gyro. Everything checked out.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-13, 10:07 PM
EVA complete. Everything went as planned.

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 10:08 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

EVA over.

Mission briefing in progress.

No final answer on ding. Still studying. Shannon held up a stereolithography model of the damaged tiles. It would make a nice souvenir ashtray. Thermoanalysis is complicated but it's working in NASA's favor. Seems like the divot will hold stagnant flow, a good thing. Most heat will be on backside of divot not down in hole. But it's messy so the computational fluid dynamic models are cranking, and also they'll try the shape in the hot arc jet. Takes time. First arc jet test tonight, of undamaged tile. Eventually arc jet may confirm computational model. Team is meeting to review repair options, just to be ready if repair is necessary.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-13, 10:10 PM
Watching the press conferance. It's very cool. They used Stereo Lithography to recreate the section so we can really see how big and deep the gouge is now.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-13, 10:27 PM
Ya know, another thing that annoys me with the reporters is that they all seem to want to show how much they know by going into a lot of detail and background about their questions instead of just asking the question. They just keep on talking until they get essentially cut off. Seems like things would move a lot quicker if they just cut to the chase and stop showing off. :)

01101001
2007-Aug-13, 11:57 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Another briefing on now, for the EVA, gyros, highlights for tomorrow.

Asked about risk for underbelly tile repair, the manager reviewed potential damage to other tiles from hard objects like tools and astronauts (wearing 300-pound suit and support). They do have to be careful down there.

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 03:38 AM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up, morning events (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):


Flight Day 7
08/14/07 Tue 06:37 AM 05 12 00 STS/ISS crew wakeup
08/14/07 Tue 08:47 AM 05 14 10 SRMS ESP-3 grapple
08/14/07 Tue 09:02 AM 05 14 25 SRMS ESP-3 unberthing
08/14/07 Tue 09:32 AM 05 14 55 SRMS ESP-3 handoff
08/14/07 Tue 10:12 AM 05 15 35 SSRMS ESP-3 grapple
08/14/07 Tue 10:27 AM 05 15 50 SRMS ungrapples ESP-3
08/14/07 Tue 10:27 AM 05 15 50 EVA-3: Tools configured
08/14/07 Tue 10:42 AM 05 16 05 SSRMS maneuvers ESP-3 to install position
08/14/07 Tue 11:42 AM 05 17 05 ESP-3 installation
08/14/07 Tue 12:27 PM 05 17 50 SSRMS ungrapples ESP-3
08/14/07 Tue 12:27 PM 05 17 50 Spacesuit swap
08/14/07 Tue 12:42 PM 05 18 05 SSRMS WS4 configured for translation
08/14/07 Tue 12:57 PM 05 18 20 Equipment lock preps
08/14/07 Tue 01:17 PM 05 18 40 Crew meals begin

Executive summary: Grapple, unberth, handoff, grapple, ungrapple, ungrapple, swap, eat.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-14, 07:50 AM
Why all the fuss about a gouge? I was under the impression that in the initial missions, the shuttles lost a fair number of tiles each mission. Certainly losing some tiles is worse than gouging a couple.

Unless of course the location is particularly critical (e.g. the leading edges of wings, which doomed Columbia) --- but the reports I've heard indicate that the gouge isn't in a critical location.
Any chance the repair could worsen the problem? (e.g., they could damage something else while out there --- or maybe the repair could worsen the condition of the gouged tiles if not done correctly)I'm with you 100%. I think they should go back to flying blind and trusting luck and the NASA reputation for complete success.

Meanwhile, the MechE in me really got riled when I first saw the media report of a "3 inch gouge".

OK, is that 3 inches in length, width, depth, total volume (as a square), or do you (the media) have no clue what you're talking about?

Swift
2007-Aug-14, 12:38 PM
OK, is that 3 inches in length, width, depth, total volume (as a square), or do you (the media) have no clue what you're talking about?
Oh, oh, oh!!!!!! Mr. Mak, Mr. Mak, pick me, pick me, I know the answer!!!!!

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 01:21 PM
Just heard that Barbara Morgan does the rounds of the news shows today, interviews with several networks. Missed the particulars. ABC and Fox were among them, the shows I know not. And she does the first of three educational events with some students in Idaho today.

As I typed, I just heard she was doing some grappling with the arm. Am I the only one who thinks of professional wrestling whenever I hear that term?

Grapple confirmed!

I just learned about a whole 'nother grapple. Not a word I use every day, I net-looked up the word to see if I could be reminded of some other meanings besides wrestling and grabbing. I've seen it in the supermarket fruit section. The Grapple(TM). It's pronounced gray-pul. (Then marketing should have spelled it graple.) Much to my relief it's not Frankenstein food. It's an apple soaked in grape juice. Now you know.

pghnative
2007-Aug-14, 04:42 PM
I'm with you 100%. I think they should go back to flying blind and trusting luck and the NASA reputation for complete success.Is that a sarcastic comment aimed at me? If so, it is not appreciated. If not, then apologies for misinterpreting.

I fully support NASA's running of the numbers. I'm merely speculating that attempting a repair for the sake of repair (as seemed to be suggested by novaderrik) and/or for the sake of publicity was more risky than landing as is.

I know the loss of many tiles occurred on the early missions. I'm curious as to whether that problem was fixed, or whether the shuttle still periodically loses tiles.

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 04:58 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up, afternoon events (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):


08/14/07 Tue 01:17 PM 05 18 40 Crew meals begin
08/14/07 Tue 02:17 PM 05 19 40 Lab window pane replacement

Darn those neighbor kids and their stupid baseballs!
Hey, you kids, get off my lawn!


08/14/07 Tue 02:27 PM 05 19 50 OBSS OSE EVA-4 prep
08/14/07 Tue 03:32 PM 05 20 55 PAO event
08/14/07 Tue 03:37 PM 05 21 00 EVA-3: Tools configured
08/14/07 Tue 05:57 PM 05 23 20 Educational event with Morgan
08/14/07 Tue 06:37 PM 06 00 00 EVA-3: Procedures review
08/14/07 Tue 09:02 PM 06 02 25 EVA-3: Mask pre-breathe
08/14/07 Tue 09:42 PM 06 03 05 EVA-3: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
08/14/07 Tue 10:07 PM 06 03 30 ISS crew sleep begins
08/14/07 Tue 10:37 PM 06 04 00 STS crew sleep begins

... perchance to dream. Of another spacewalk.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-14, 05:15 PM
Darn those neighbor kids and their stupid baseballs!
Hey, you kids, get off my lawn!
Baseballs? I thought the problem was golf balls. :think:

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 05:16 PM
Heh. Spacecraft communicator just told the astronauts that spouses and family members were in the control room, providing lunch to the workers.

"So, you folks, lunch is on you today. Thanks!"

"Well, that's very nice of us. You're welcome."

===

Excuse me while I lay out some links on this new page....

Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

===

Edit: Interviews of 5 US networks (the usual suspects) with astronauts begins at 1:01 pm CDT (1101 PDT, 1401 EDT, 1801 UTC)
Edit: 20 minutes into the interviews. I get it. They're doing taped interviews, probably for this evening's or tomorrow morning's broadcast. ABC Good Morning Today, CBS, now CNN. Caldwell (happy birthday!), Morgan, and Kelly, it appears.

Hah. CNN just said Kelly's got the perfect space haircut (very short), and said Barbara Morgan definitely sports big hair. Shampoo discussion followed. At end CNN asked for a group somersault. Not sure it's wise to swing booty past a wide-angle lens. NBC asked about Morgan hair, too. Fox News now, live. I wonder if they're getting tired of saying the same thing about the belly ding. They're holding up though the fifth round.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-14, 08:20 PM
John Shannon's comments re: damaged tile (from spaceflightnow.com (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/070813mmt/))


"We're not talking about catastrophic damage," Shannon said. "But if I have to pull off five or six tiles (after landing) and put a doubler on some structure, replace a rib or anything like that, that's going to increase my turnaround time between (flights) and I'd like to avoid that if possible, if I have an EVA that I think is easy to execute. Now all of that assumes we come back and show that we would have localized heating that could cause some damage underneath and we haven't done that yet."

Asked a second time about the threat represented by the tile damage, Shannon said "this is not a catastrophic loss-of-orbiter case at all. This is a case where you want to do the prudent thing for the vehicle."
(bold mine)

Nicolas
2007-Aug-14, 08:41 PM
Translated:

"in the nominal case the tile isn't missing a piece and now it is, so we have to check whether that changes anything or not".

Replacing a rib would increase TAT indeed... but my layman eye says that even without any repair it won't be that much of an issue. But I'm 100% with investigating things thoroughly and then deciding whether a repair is the best decision.

Compare this to STS-27 which came back unharmed with a seriously damaged shield. Or STS-1 which lost a load of tiles and came back OK (well, not really ok, but the damage was unrelated to the heat shield, all due to acoustics at launch.)

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 09:14 PM
Barbara Morgan (with 3 others) is now doing the first of three educational events, this with kids in Idaho.

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)


Baseballs? I thought the problem was golf balls. :think:

Aha!

First question from a student: "If you throw a baseball in space how fast would it go?"

Edit, 37 minutes after the hour: Idaho educational event over.

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 09:23 PM
Asked about risk for underbelly tile repair, the manager reviewed potential damage to other tiles from hard objects like tools and astronauts (wearing 300-pound suit and support). They do have to be careful down there.

Here's SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/070813mmt/)'s much better capture of some of that part of the briefing:


As for the risk involved in working under the space shuttle, Boehm said "one of the concerns we have, obviously, is they're wearing a 300-pound EMU (spacesuit) with about 150 pounds of tools on them. ... Obviously, any of those things dinging into the tile underneath potentially could damage the tile. So we take extra care to make sure all our safety tethers and tools and everything are safely away from the orbiter when we go in for those type of repairs."

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-14, 09:50 PM
I'm trying to remember, if they do decide to perform the repair, would they put the astronaut on the end of the OBSS or would the station arm reach?

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 10:06 PM
I'm trying to remember, if they do decide to perform the repair, would they put the astronaut on the end of the OBSS or would the station arm reach?

Sounds like shuttle arm. CBS mission status (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


But I would say the trickiest part is looking out for, coming underneath the orbiter. The payload bay doors on the port side where we have the shoulder of the shuttle arm based, just making sure we clear that, and the wing. And then just having really good coordination between those of us inside the cockpit operating the arm and our guys outside who may perhaps be on the end of it."

I think
SSRMS = space station arm
SRMS = shuttle arm
OBSS = orbiter boom sensor system (laser scanner and camera)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-14, 10:15 PM
Ah, I didn't think the SRMS reached the underside of the orbiter. Cool.

01101001
2007-Aug-14, 10:20 PM
Ah, I didn't think the SRMS reached the underside of the orbiter. Cool.

Credit Canada!

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 02:14 AM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up, morning events (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):


Flight Day 8
08/15/07 Wed 06:37 AM 06 12 00 STS/ISS crew wakeup
08/15/07 Wed 07:17 AM 06 12 40 EVA-3: Airlock repress to 14.7 psi
08/15/07 Wed 07:37 AM 06 13 00 EVA-3: Hygiene break
08/15/07 Wed 07:57 AM 06 13 20 EVA-3: Airlock depress to 10.2 psi
08/15/07 Wed 08:27 AM 06 13 50 EVA-3; Campout EVA prep
08/15/07 Wed 09:57 AM 06 15 20 EVA-3: Spacesuit purge
08/15/07 Wed 10:12 AM 06 15 35 EVA-3: Spacesuit pre-breathe
08/15/07 Wed 11:02 AM 06 16 25 EVA-3: Airlock depressurization
08/15/07 Wed 11:37 AM 06 17 00 EVA-3: Airlock egress
08/15/07 Wed 11:52 AM 06 17 15 EVA-3: Setup
08/15/07 Wed 12:32 PM 06 17 55 EVA-3: EV1: P6 SASA relocation
08/15/07 Wed 12:32 PM 06 17 55 EVA-3: EV3: P1 BSP and transponder installation
08/15/07 Wed 02:27 PM 06 19 50 EVA-3: CETA 1 move starboard

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 02:21 AM
NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

Mission Elapsed Time
06 Days 03 Hours 43 Minutes 00 Seconds

CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)

8:40 PM, 8/14/07, Update: Shannon 'cautiously optimistic' shuttle can re-enter without repairs


Sophisticated computer analysis indicates the aluminum skin directly below a small gash in the shuttle Endeavour's heat shield will not exceed NASA's 350-degree safety limit during re-entry, a top NASA manager said late today, despite temperatures of up to 2,100 degrees just outside the gouge. If overnight tests in a high-temperature furnace show the computer models are accurate - and if independent analysts agree - NASA managers may decide there's no need for a spacewalk repair job.

"We've completed the initial thermal analysis," said John Shannon, chairman of NASA's Mission Management Team. "It is going through an independent quality check and that's to take people who were not involved in the process to look at the assumptions that were made, the math, to make sure everything was done correctly. We've also completed the computational fluid dynamics that tells you what the flow inside that small cavity would be. Ames Research Center did that work, it's currently being verified by the Langley Research Center.

"The results of that, we're cautiously optimistic that we can fly as is, that's what the results were today. However, that's without any of the arc jet testing that we've talked about. Last night, we ran a baseline case of non-damaged tiles in the arc jet facility and they got a baseline temperature measurement on the backside of the tiles. At 7 o'clock, in about 40 minutes, we're going to start the arc jet tests with the exact damage we have on orbit. That will play back into the analysis."
[...]
So I would think that by late tomorrow afternoon, maybe in the early evening, we will have all our quality checks done, we will have our verification of the computational fluid dynamics model and we'll have the arc jet data to say that that modeling was correct and then we can make a decision on whether we need to repair or not."

Maksutov
2007-Aug-15, 06:49 AM
Oh, oh, oh!!!!!! Mr. Mak, Mr. Mak, pick me, pick me, I know the answer!!!!!So, there it is. OK, the red and black fellow in the back row! What do you have for us today?

Maksutov
2007-Aug-15, 07:05 AM
Is that a sarcastic comment aimed at me? If so, it is not appreciated. If not, then apologies for misinterpreting.You got it right. Please pardon me, I'm just a little oversensitive about the thermal protection system, and the "Why all the fuss about a gouge?" comment rubbed me the wrong way, reminding me of O'Keefe's put-downs of the "foamologists". Sorry if that irked you, and I apologize for any unpleasantness or bad feelings it may have caused.
I fully support NASA's running of the numbers. I'm merely speculating that attempting a repair for the sake of repair (as seemed to be suggested by novaderrik) and/or for the sake of publicity was more risky than landing as is.I'm firmly in the "If it ain't broke..." camp, but in this case they've found something broken, and I agree it's good NASA's crunching some numbers and doing engineering work instead of PR. There's always the risk factor that a repair may make things worse, but that's part of the engineering equation, in this case hopefully an insignificant factor.

Perhaps somewhere in the US there's a lab that has reproduced the gouge in an equivalent thermal tile and is subjecting it to the same conditions it will see on entry. Since that's just a few minutes of extreme temperatures the results would be in well before the actual event, and with enough time to be a factor in a repair/no repair decision.
I know the loss of many tiles occurred on the early missions. I'm curious as to whether that problem was fixed, or whether the shuttle still periodically loses tiles.This is just from memory, but it seems that complete loss of tiles ended shortly after Columbia's first flight, when the improved noise abatement system was installed and adhesive issues were resolved. The problem since then has been damage to the tiles.

tofu
2007-Aug-15, 02:16 PM
Hopefully this hasn't been posted yet:

Close-up pics of the damaged tiles (http://blogs.zdnet.com/emergingtech/?p=662)

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 03:23 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Today's EVA has been in progress probably about an hour.

Edit: Probably much, much less than that if I got my timezone right this time.

Edit: Final answer: about 30 minutes because they got an early start.
SpaceflightNow Status (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html): "1453 GMT (10:53 a.m. EDT) Both spacewalkers have emerged [...]"

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-15, 03:59 PM
Perhaps somewhere in the US there's a lab that has reproduced the gouge in an equivalent thermal tile and is subjecting it to the same conditions it will see on entry.

NASA was doing this at JSC. After the conferance a couple days ago where John Shannon had a stereo-lithography mockup of the damaged area they showed some footage of 5-axis mill shaping a piece of tile with the exact gouge, then send it to the arc-jet for testing.

Moose
2007-Aug-15, 06:17 PM
Ah, I didn't think the SRMS reached the underside of the orbiter. Cool.

If there's one thing Canadians know, it's that sometimes you gotta reach for that beer.

Moose
2007-Aug-15, 06:27 PM
I'm firmly in the "If it ain't broke..." camp, but in this case they've found something broken, and I agree it's good NASA's crunching some numbers and doing engineering work instead of PR. There's always the risk factor that a repair may make things worse, but that's part of the engineering equation, in this case hopefully an insignificant factor.

This is well said.

My (layperson's) instinct suggests that attempting a fix is better than not attempting a fix. I guess it comes down to my trusting in the skill of the astronauts to not break anything else down there. From there, even if the repair isn't strictly necessary, it's not a bad idea to get some experience with this sort of work before something truly life-threatening comes along.

But yeah, I'm normally pretty well entrenched in the "leave it alone" camp. But that's because outside of a manual screwdriver (or hexogonal screw-head driver, whatever those are called) inside a PC of some kind, I'm utterly dangerous to life, limb, and property.

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 06:35 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

Coming up, afternoon events (times EDT and mission elapsed dd...hh...mm):

Lunchtime. Except for the guys still outside. What do they get? Space Food Sticks (http://www.spacefoodsticks.com/spacefood/index.html)? (Which, I confess, I used to actually buy at the grocery and enjoy.)


08/15/07 Wed 03:07 PM 06 20 30 Crew meals
08/15/07 Wed 03:27 PM 06 20 50 EVA-3: CETA 2 move starboard
08/15/07 Wed 04:27 PM 06 21 50 EVA-3: EV1: SASA gimbal locks
08/15/07 Wed 04:27 PM 06 21 50 EVA-3: EV3: P6 transponder retrieval
08/15/07 Wed 04:57 PM 06 22 20 EVA-3: EV1: MISSE 3 and 4 removal
08/15/07 Wed 05:07 PM 06 22 30 Spacehab debris shields
08/15/07 Wed 05:42 PM 06 23 05 EVA-3: Airlock ingress
08/15/07 Wed 06:02 PM 06 23 25 EVA-3: Airlock repressurization
08/15/07 Wed 06:12 PM 06 23 35 SRMS powerdown
08/15/07 Wed 06:27 PM 06 23 50 MISSE-3 transfer
08/15/07 Wed 06:47 PM 07 00 10 MISSE-4 transfer
08/15/07 Wed 07:42 PM 07 01 05 Transfer tagup
08/15/07 Wed 09:37 PM 07 03 00 ISS crew sleep begins
08/15/07 Wed 10:07 PM 07 03 30 STS crew sleep begins

MET currently 6 Days 19 Hours 59 Minutes

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-15, 06:39 PM
(or hexogonal screw-head driver, whatever those are called)

Some are called "hex head screws", some are called "socket head cap screws", some are "allen head screws" depends on the particular fastener and, sometimes, where in the country you are.

ETA, as a machinist, we just called the actual tools Hex Drivers (for the screwdriver type) or allen wrenches (for the L-shaped tool).

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 06:57 PM
Rick Mastracchio heading in as a precaution because a regular glove inspection revealed oddness of the thumbs.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-15, 06:59 PM
Mastrachio heading in as a precaution beacuse a glove inspecition revealed oddness of the thimbs.

Your thumbs? :lol:

Edit: wow, you fixed that one fast.

Moose
2007-Aug-15, 06:59 PM
Where the driver fits around the screw's head, not the (phillips) notch itself, right? Yeah, come to think of it, I've heard them called "hex drivers" before.

I have successfully used a hex wrench without (serious) injury as well (cheapo thing they give you to assemble furniture), as well as a half-decent (meaning "better than IKEA") set of allen wrenches and keys.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-15, 06:59 PM
Do the flight rules allow Anderson to continue working alone? I thought that 2 people had to be out at the same time.

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 07:02 PM
Do the flight rules allow Anderson to continue working alone? I thought that 2 people had to be out at the same time.

(Sorry for the spelling. Bad server-performance day.)

He'll linger in the airlock, so it's probably OK.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-15, 07:03 PM
Hm...I gather listening to the PAO that he will remain in the airlock. So technically both will still be outside.

Incidentally, they also anwwered my previous quetion re: gloves being used as the old Apollo EMU check. The only instituted the glove check after STS-116. So I guess the answer is "no, it's not the same as the Apollo EMU check" :)

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 07:06 PM
I pray Clay Anderson doesn't turn his back on that killer Canadian robotic arm.

(Just heard: Clay to finish current task and then head in -- if he can...)

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-15, 07:08 PM
Heh, Clay has to clean up all the tools alone now. THAT's why Rick popped a hole in his glove. He didn't wanna clean up.

Nicolas
2007-Aug-15, 07:23 PM
Very likely :D.

We're getting an awful lot of spacewalking experience with the ISS, that's for sure.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-15, 09:22 PM
I pray Clay Anderson doesn't turn his back on that killer Canadian robotic arm....Look out if he can't find a fault in the AE-35 unit...

01101001
2007-Aug-15, 11:03 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

A mission status briefing was scheduled for now, but it's delayed. The management team is still meeting. They'll announce a time when it's decided.

NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

The holey glove:
http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/186354main_sts118_mastracchio_glove.jpg (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


7:24 PM, 8/15/07, Update: Spacewalk No. 4 moved from Friday to Saturday; no decision yet on tile repair

As expected, the Endeavour astronauts will delay their fourth spacewalk, from Friday to Saturday, to protect against the possibility of an unprecedented heat shield repair. NASA's Mission Management Team met into the evening today, assessing test results and exploring various mission scenarios, but a final decision on whether or not to order a repair spacewalk was not expected until Thursday.

By delaying the shuttle crew's fourth spacewalk from Friday to Saturday, however, mission managers will have time to refine their plans if the MMT does, in fact, decide a tile repair is needed. In that case, the repair work would be carried out Saturday and a fifth spacewalk could be added Monday to complete the delayed station work. That scenario likely would result in a two-day mission extension and a landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Aug. 24.

If the tile repair is not needed, the astronauts would simply carry out the previously planned space station assembly spacewalk on Saturday and land as currently scheduled on Aug. 22.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-15, 11:14 PM
Look out if he can't find a fault in the AE-35 unit...

It can only be human error.

Moose
2007-Aug-15, 11:31 PM
I pray Clay Anderson doesn't turn his back on that killer Canadian robotic arm.

Just so he doesn't get between the arm and the beer, and he'll be fine.

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 12:38 AM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Mission Status Briefing has started

Covered EVA 3, the glove. Next EVA slipped to Saturday. As reported above, haven't decided if it's normal activities or for repair.

MMT team tired but Shannon wanted to delay repair decision until tomorrow, done with fresh minds.

Cute: gonna run one more arc jet test tonight using a simplified geometry like the thermal analysis uses. That will probably validate the arc jet and vice versa. Then the arc jet test run previously on more complicated, more real geometry may be more trustworthy. Each model, software and arc jet, has its limitations, so comparing gives reassurance for each. More data good.

(I'm surprised no reporter is asking if the shuttle tile goo could be used to repair the glove. Mastracchio does have a spare pair up there.)

Briefing over.

danscope
2007-Aug-16, 02:09 AM
I should think it would be prudent to do the field repair... ie "gloop" patch,
and enjoy the advantage of both the repair, and the true test of the repair.
This should be a most simple repair by far compared with much worse senarios. Just seems to make good sense.
Dan

novaderrik
2007-Aug-16, 02:19 AM
was it on the return to flight mission where they hooked the astronaut to the sensor boom, which was attached to the shuttle arm, to go pull that spacer thing that stuck out 1/4", even tho they said it posed no threat?
so i can't really see them not trying to "fix" this.
if they don't try to fix this, then the general public gets told by the media that NASA doesn't care. if they do go out to fix it, and they make things worse, then they are incompetent and people wil lcry for them to stop shooting dollars and people off into the heavens.
this is almost a no-win situation unless the go out and ceremonially smear some goop over the hole and don't make it any worse.

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 02:25 AM
I should think it would be prudent to do the field repair... ie "gloop" patch,
and enjoy the advantage of both the repair, and the true test of the repair.

I read somewhere some commanders aren't so trusting in the safety of an untested repair method. For instance the goo could dislodge and damage other tiles.

I couldn't find that story, but came upon this from STS114. USA Today: Crew: NASA's attitudes still need to change (http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-04-07-nasa-attitudes_x.htm)


And there was clear dissent between the shuttle crew and Mission Control on the techniques for fixing the spacecraft in orbit.

Collins said that before relying on repair materials to get home, she would like to see them thoroughly tested. Her crew plans to perform tests of some repair techniques, then, after landing, hand the samples to engineers for more tests. "I have always believed that a repair method should be tested in the vacuum of space, brought back home and run through ... a test facility," Collins said.

In February, astronauts said that rather than trusting an untested repair, they would prefer to use the space station as a lifeboat in an emergency.

I believe the goo is still untested in space.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-16, 03:33 AM
Question: Is the EVA spacesuit pressurized entirely? I mean, all the way out to the fingertips of the gloves and the toes of the boots?

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 04:43 AM
Question: Is the EVA spacesuit pressurized entirely?

NASA Return to Flight: Going out for a walk (http://ksnn.larc.nasa.gov/rtf/art_goingout.htm)


Of course, there are a few challenges involved in performing a spacewalk. Since the space suit is pressurized, it requires some effort to move the fingers of the glove. It's not difficult at first, but after several hours, an astronaut's hands can get tired and sore.

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 04:55 AM
SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/070815eva3/index4.html) More from the briefing re the repair, about why-not:


Barring an unexpected surprise, [Mission Management Team Chairman John] Shannon said he remains "cautiously optimistic" a repair spacewalk will not be needed. And he made it clear the risks associated with a repair spacewalk are high enough to rule out attempting a fix if it is not absolutely necessary.

"We're pondering for 24 hours, but my personal feeling was that the data at the 80 to 90 percent level was that we could (return to Earth) as is and that the EVA carries sufficient risk to it that we would not just go do it (to add) additional margin," he said.
[...]
But Shannon made it clear he views the risk of a spacewalk repair as significant and that such a repair could only be justified if it was necessary to prevent serious damage during re-entry. And based on the testing to date, that does not appear to be the case.

"The way I would summarize it is, if we were in a critical situation I think we could pull it off, I think we would have the rationale to put all those different things together and come off with a very successful EVA," he said. "But you have to recognize there is some additional risk in doing that task.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-16, 05:02 AM
Question: Is the EVA spacesuit pressurized entirely? I mean, all the way out to the fingertips of the gloves and the toes of the boots?

Yea. Completely pressurized. Without it, the extremities would be exposed to vacuum. On the Apollo missions the moonwalker's hands suffered mightily because every time they wanted to pick something up they had to push against nearly 4 psi. They got seriously tired. Since then, glove design has come a long way to ease the amount of strength needed, but they still make sure they work the forearms before flight to build the muscles.

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 01:54 PM
Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)

That's no good right now. The schedule is old and not updated yet.

Ah. This looks current: NASA TV STS-118 Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/186501main_118TVm.pdf) (PDF)

Coming up -- but stay flexible; things might be changing (Times are mission elapsed, CDT, EDT, UTC):


121 ASSOCIATED PRESS TELEVISION / REUTERS / IDAHO PUBLIC TELEVISION LIVE INTERVIEWS TDRE 07/ 15:40 09:16 AM 10:16 AM 14:16
124 * EVA TOOL GATHERING 07/ 18:25 12:01 PM 01:01 PM 17:01
124 * VIDEO FILE HQ 07/ 19:54 01:30 PM 02:30 PM 18:30
125 * T-RAD & EWA PREPARATIONS FOR EVA (if required) 07/ 20:25 02:01 PM 03:01 PM 19:01
125 * OFF DUTY PERIOD BEGINS 07/ 21:25 03:01 PM 04:01 PM 20:01
125 * MISSION STATUS BRIEFING JSC 07/ 23:24 05:00 PM 06:00 PM 22:00
128 ISS CREW SLEEP BEGINS 08/ 02:00 07:36 PM 08:36 PM 00:36

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 02:53 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


7:50 AM, 8/16/07, Update: Astronauts await tile repair decision; controllers expect word by early afternoon

The Endeavour astronauts are awake and working through a revised flight plan today, awaiting word from NASA's Mission Management Team on whether the space shuttle's gouged heat shield can stand up to the rigors of re-entry as is or whether an unprecedented tile repair spacewalk will be needed Saturday. During a morning "big picture" update for commander Scott Kelly, astronaut Chris Ferguson in mission control said a decision was expected by noon or shortly thereafter.

"Understand the decision might be made today at noon and we won't actually pull any of the (tile repair) hardware out until then. Is that still something the guys are anticipating?" Kelly asked.

"Yeah, Scott, we have every reason to believe that a decision is going to be made by noon and that's why the flight plan for today was put together the way that it was," Ferguson replied. "The idea is to not have you drag anything out unless you need to have it out so you don't have to put it away. But you know, I mean the MMT working the way that sometimes these things work, it may get delayed. And if it does, we're going to have to stick to the flight plan and pull some of the equipment out. But, hopefully, by lunch we will have some words for you."

Tucson_Tim
2007-Aug-16, 02:59 PM
Yea. Completely pressurized. Without it, the extremities would be exposed to vacuum. On the Apollo missions the moonwalker's hands suffered mightily because every time they wanted to pick something up they had to push against nearly 4 psi. They got seriously tired. Since then, glove design has come a long way to ease the amount of strength needed, but they still make sure they work the forearms before flight to build the muscles.

Thanks!

I was wondering what would happen if their gloves were cut deep enough - would it de-pressurize the entire system? Or is the suit divided into "zones"?

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-16, 04:16 PM
Thanks!

I was wondering what would happen if their gloves were cut deep enough - would it de-pressurize the entire system? Or is the suit divided into "zones"?

It would depressurize the whole system. They're basically big balloons. Really really really complex ballons. :)

More info on the Wiki article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extravehicular_Mobility_Unit).

Kind of interesting, and something I didn't know,


Only the gloves have to be custom-made, costing over $40,000 USD for each pair – the suits can be reused up to 25 times with regular maintenance and are assembled from components based on the astronauts height, weight, and body structure.

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 05:05 PM
Only the gloves have to be custom-made, costing over $40,000 USD for each pair – the suits can be reused up to 25 times with regular maintenance and are assembled from components based on the astronauts height, weight, and body structure.

And we know Mastracchio has his spare pair aboard, and I assume the others do, too, at least among the regularly scheduled spacewalkers.

I wonder what happens to those gloves after an astronaut leaves NASA. Are they retirement gifts? Do they save them in case a new astronaut comes along who happens to take exactly the same shape. Or do they, like, donate the gloves to impoverished 3rd-world space programs?

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 05:08 PM
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


12:31 PM, 8/16/07, Update: ADVISORY - MMT meeting pushed back to 4 p.m.; tile repair decision expected late today

NASA's Mission Management Team will meet at 4 p.m. EDT today, two hours later than originally planned, to give engineers more time to complete a complex analysis of what impact, if any, a gouge in the shuttle Endeavour's heat shield might have during re-entry. As a result, a decision on whether to order a repair spacewalk Saturday - or a normal space station assembly EVA - is not expected until late in the day.

"We're expecting a fairly long afternoon's worth of meetings and our mission status briefing that is currently scheduled at (6 p.m. EDT) could easily be pushed back into the early evening hours," said mission control commentator Rob Navias.

Cue the thinking-theme music from Jeopardy.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-16, 05:12 PM
"We're expecting a fairly long afternoon's worth of meetings

As somebody that sits in a lot of meetings every week, I think I can sum up how these guys feel with one word. "*sigh*"

Ok not a word...but still.

danscope
2007-Aug-16, 05:21 PM
Late Communication:
"12:31 PM, 8/16/07, Update: ADVISORY - MMT meeting pushed back to 4 p.m.; tile repair decision expected late today

NASA's Mission Management Team will meet at 4 p.m. EDT today, two hours later than originally planned, to give engineers more time to complete a complex analysis of what impact, if any, a gouge in the shuttle Endeavour's heat shield might have during re-entry. As a result, a decision on whether to order a repair spacewalk Saturday - or a normal space station assembly EVA - is not expected until late in the day.

"We're expecting a fairly long afternoon's worth of meetings and our mission status briefing that is currently scheduled at (6 p.m. EDT) could easily be pushed back into the early evening hours," said mission control commentator Rob Navias.
***********
" Nothing's easy. I needed a haircut. My mother-in-law had a straight razor in her shoe !" ................ I worte that for Rodney . :)
Dan

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-16, 05:40 PM
Late Communication:...
At least when 01101001 posted the same thing, he had his own comment on it. ;)

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 11:05 PM
Anyone want to tackle this one?

Barbara Morgan Talks With Students on Ham Radio (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/podcasting/STS118_morgan_radio.html)


Q: What is the temperature outside the space station?

Morgan: 300 degrees hot, and when you're on the nighttime side, it's 300 degrees cold.

It is sort of poetic.

===

MMT is still meeting. Tick... Tick... Tick... Like a Bergman movie.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-16, 11:08 PM
Anyone want to tackle this one?

Barbara Morgan Talks With Students on Ham Radio (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/podcasting/STS118_morgan_radio.html)



It is sort of poetic.

===

MMT is still meeting. Tick... Tick... Tick... Like a Bergman movie.

Good thing those students didn't ask us. The aswer would have been "What's the temperature of what outside the station?" :lol:

nauthiz
2007-Aug-16, 11:12 PM
300 degrees hot, and when you're on the nighttime side, it's 300 degrees cold.
What does that even mean!?!?

01101001
2007-Aug-16, 11:18 PM
What does that even mean!?!?

Maybe there was an audio dropout, or maybe she thinks so fast that her mouth can't always keep up, or maybe the transcriber flubbed it.

Or maybe it's 300 degrees out.

There's this one...


[...] it's kind of like a flimsy sleeping bag that we can zip ourselves into clip to the wall somewhere so that you float around and hit your head on the equipment.

Oh, that must be it. The sleeping bag made her hit her head on the equipment so it just seems it's always 300 degrees out.

I'm really glad nobody transcribes my dialogs for dissection!

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-16, 11:28 PM
What does that even mean!?!?

As far as trrying to explain something like this to young kids, I can understand her answer. A 5th grader isn't going to understand the priciples of heat transfer in a vacuum. It's not a horrible non-technical answer.

What's the alternative?
Kid: What's the temperature outside the space station?
Barbara: Well, actually that question doesn't make any sense. Now if you were to ask me what the temperature of the 1st layer of the Shuttle EMU would be outside the ISS, I would have to say it depends. If you were to permanently park yourself in the Earth's L2 point, eventually you would reach thermal equillibrium of approximately -300 F. However, If you were to permanently park yourself at the L1 point, you would reach thermal equillibium of approximately 300 F. And by the way, both of these numbers are variable depending on the amount of heat energy you create via electronics or body heating."
Kid: Um....I like peanut butter.

:)

stutefish
2007-Aug-17, 12:18 AM
As far as trrying to explain something like this to young kids, I can understand her answer. A 5th grader isn't going to understand the priciples of heat transfer in a vacuum. It's not a horrible non-technical answer.

What's the alternative?
Kid: What's the temperature outside the space station?
Barbara: Well, actually that question doesn't make any sense. Now if you were to ask me what the temperature of the 1st layer of the Shuttle EMU would be outside the ISS, I would have to say it depends. If you were to permanently park yourself in the Earth's L2 point, eventually you would reach thermal equillibrium of approximately -300 F. However, If you were to permanently park yourself at the L1 point, you would reach thermal equillibium of approximately 300 F. And by the way, both of these numbers are variable depending on the amount of heat energy you create via electronics or body heating."
Kid: Um....I like peanut butter.

:)
I dunno. It seems like there's at least three ways to go about answering this question:
1. Astronaut-style: Laconic, technical, possibly dryly witty, and probably unintelligble to a fifth-grader.
2. Teacher-style: Simple, to the point, and with a view to leaving the questioner better-informed than they were before.
3. Politician-style: Unintelligble gibberish, because Astrophysics Is Hard, and nobody really cares about the content of a PR event anyway.

What's the point of having a "teacher" field questions, if she's going to choose Option 3 instead of Option 2? And seeing as how she's an astronaut, why didn't we get Option 1?

nauthiz
2007-Aug-17, 01:01 AM
Yeah, it sounded like #3 to me, too. But I guess most grade schoolers wouldn't worry about whether "300 degrees cold" means -300F, -300C, 300K, or 300R.

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 01:04 AM
No repair.

Flight Plan (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/fdf/pdfs/118flightplan.pdf)
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
NASA Space Shuttle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)
SpaceflightNow (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts118/status.html)
CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


8:57 PM, 8/16/07, Update: ADVISORY - Mission Management Team adjourns; spacewalk decision expected shortly

NASA's Mission Management Team has finished a five-hour meeting to make a final decision on whether to order a heat shield repair spaceswalk Saturday or clear the ship for a return to Earth as is. A mission status briefing with MMT Chairman John Shannon is expected shortly and this page will be updated as soon as possible thereafter.

And I heard on the radio, ABC News, that the decision is not to repair the gouged tiles.

Edit: Update CBS News Space Place (http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/current.html)


9:00 PM, 8/16/07, Update: ADVISORY - Mission Management Team adjourns; tile repair spacewalk ruled out; Endeavour cleared for entry 'as is'

After a five-hour meeting to assess the health of the shuttle Endeavour's heat shield, NASA's Mission Management Team has ruled out a heat shield repair spaceswalk Saturday and cleared the crew for re-entry as is. The astronauts now will focus on a final space station assembly spacewalk Saturday to complete the major goals of their mission. MMT Chairman John Shannon is scheduled to brief reporters at 9:30 p.m. This status report will be updated as soon as possible thereafter.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-17, 01:19 AM
I dunno. It seems like there's at least three ways to go about answering this question:
1. Astronaut-style: Laconic, technical, possibly dryly witty, and probably unintelligble to a fifth-grader.
2. Teacher-style: Simple, to the point, and with a view to leaving the questioner better-informed than they were before.
3. Politician-style: Unintelligble gibberish, because Astrophysics Is Hard, and nobody really cares about the content of a PR event anyway.

What's the point of having a "teacher" field questions, if she's going to choose Option 3 instead of Option 2? And seeing as how she's an astronaut, why didn't we get Option 1?

So in your theory, you shouldn't answer the question based on the audience being children because some educated adults might know a more detailed explanation? It seems to me this would just scare the poor kids away from pursuing science.

Besides, she didn't actually say anything wrong, she just didn't give a technical answer. Those of us that know that technical answer can certainly spot places where her answer was, at most, ambiguous, but what did she say that was "untelligible gibberish"?

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 01:36 AM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Mission briefing has just begun.

John Shannon: In MMT meeting it was unanimous that tile damage was not crew-loss threatening. It was overwhelming, a few dissented, not to do repair. If repair was attempted, it would change the cavity shape and could potentially worsen the situation.

Showed arc jet test pictures. Accurate gouge shape yielded tunneling on rear tile, but not through, and tile stayed well bonded. Showed recent test using geometric model similar to software model. Man, was it rectangular! But, arc jet results must have matched software analysis well.

Glove: looking at video. Developing rationale for EVA 4, avoiding potential places where glove was cut.

Was micrometeor debris strike on window 2. Depth estimate 1 mm. No big deal.

Hurricane Dean entering Caribbean. Will discuss potential emergency action. Dean might land in Texas Wednesday, shuttle landing day, affecting support facilities.

Reporter: do you ever feel overwhelmed with information? Shannon: I love it. We're so fortunate to have all that data. It's a huge increase in flight safety.

Reporter: why not repair? What good is the tool? Shannon: if there was a safety risk, I'd have no qualms in doing that. There is a difficulty in controlling the goo. There is risk. EVA carries danger. For that risk you don't know a repair makes anything better, and you might be making it worse.

stutefish
2007-Aug-17, 02:04 AM
So in your theory, you shouldn't answer the question based on the audience being children because some educated adults might know a more detailed explanation? It seems to me this would just scare the poor kids away from pursuing science.
Not at all. My theory distinguished between different kinds of respondents, not different kinds of questioners.


Besides, she didn't actually say anything wrong, she just didn't give a technical answer. Those of us that know that technical answer can certainly spot places where her answer was, at most, ambiguous, but what did she say that was "untelligible gibberish"?
She didn't actually say anything at all, as far as I can tell. I would have expected a teacher-astronaut, selected in part for this exchange because of her background as a teacher, to answer the question at a fifth-grade level, so that fifth-graders could learn something about astrophysics. Instead we get:


Q: What is the temperature outside the space station?

Morgan: 300 degrees hot, and when you're on the nighttime side, it's 300 degrees cold.
What, exactly, did those fifth graders learn from this answer? I know I didn't learn anything at all.

But I'm open to alternative explanations. If I'm missing some piece of simple science in this answer, please point it out to me.

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 02:15 AM
I listened to most of the Morgan ham-radio session. The transcript looked good on the temperature question, though her first word (300) was a little garbled.

But the transcriber did blow the sleeping reply. Missing words added, bold:


[...] it's kind of like a flimsy sleeping bag that we can zip ourselves into and clip to the wall somewhere so that you don't float around and hit your head on the equipment.

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-17, 02:17 AM
What, exactly, did those fifth graders learn from this answer? I know I didn't learn anything at all.

But I'm open to alternative explanations. If I'm missing some piece of simple science in this answer, please point it out to me.

I get that there is 600 degrees of temperature difference between sunlight and shadow. I compare that to my knowledge of how sunlight and shadow work on Earth, and realize that space is pretty harsh indeed. Now I want to know why there is such a drastic difference.

I agree that it's not a great answer, but I would hardly call it gibberish.

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 02:29 AM
Her answer isn't so much different from an educational page at Science@NASA: Staying Cool on the ISS (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2001/ast21mar_1.htm):


Without thermal controls, the temperature of the orbiting Space Station's Sun-facing side would soar to 250 degrees F (121 C), while thermometers on the dark side would plunge to minus 250 degrees F (-157 C). There might be a comfortable spot somewhere in the middle of the Station, but searching for it wouldn't be much fun!

Minus a "minus", and missing the actual numbers slightly, and much briefer, she echoed the party line.

stutefish
2007-Aug-17, 03:19 AM
Fair enough. If I ran the zoo, I'd not be 50 degrees off at each end, I'd include the measurement scale, and I'd identify the temperature of what. As a reasonably intelligent ten year old, I would have been disappointed and unsatisfied with the answer she gave. But hey, I'm neither a teacher nor an astronaut, and I've never hosted a radio call-in show from LEO aboard a risky spacecraft with potentially life-threatening damage, so what do I know?

danscope
2007-Aug-17, 03:42 AM
I read somewhere some commanders aren't so trusting in the safety of an untested repair method. For instance the goo could dislodge and damage other tiles.

I couldn't find that story, but came upon this from STS114. USA Today: Crew: NASA's attitudes still need to change (http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-04-07-nasa-attitudes_x.htm)



I believe the goo is still untested in space.

Hi, I understand. To me, it might be like having a partially broken fuel line
on a car's engine compartment. It's leaking gas. One person says that if he takes some chewing gum and electrical tape, it may just get them home or to a repair shop. And then there is this "Guy" , see, who says...."Nah....it'll be OK . I wouldn't 'Bother' jury rigging it. Let's just leave it alone and stop wasting time. ........Of course, an engine fire in a Corvette is a nasty thing to see, and a curious way to observe the chassis and metal components of a Corvette. I might be inclined to make the field repair if it means that some type of high temperature material gets bonded to the existing fire brick and lends a hand to serve as the "FIREWALL" between my butt and several thousand degrees...for several minutes.
When I served in submarines, we were trained to make repairs to a broken pipe , and although you might observe that those methods seemed peculiar
and perhaps arcane, they did, in fact, work just fine. When it's you against the murdering sea, you must needs summon your allies and your courage and apply yourself with your crew and "Get the job done".
Often times, that is the way of things.
Best regards, Dan

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 05:38 AM
NASA TV STS-118 Schedule (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/186501main_118TVm.pdf) (PDF)

Coming up, Friday activities (times are mission elapsed, CDT, EDT, UTC):



134 ENDEAVOUR / ISS CREW WAKE UP (begins FD 10) 08/ 10:30 04:06 AM 05:06 AM 09:06
134 ISS FLIGHT DIRECTOR UPDATE REPLAY 08/ 11:24 05:00 AM 06:00 AM 10:00
135 VIDEO FILE HQ 08/ 12:54 06:30 AM 07:30 AM 11:30
136 * ENDEAVOUR / ISS TRANSFERS RESUME 08/ 13:35 07:11 AM 08:11 AM 12:11
138 DAIU TROUBLESHOOTING 08/ 16:25 10:01 AM 11:01 AM 15:01
140 * JOINT CREW NEWS CONFERENCE ISS Ku 08/ 18:58 12:34 PM 01:34 PM 17:34
140 MISSION STATUS BRIEFING JSC 08/ 20:24 02:00 PM 03:00 PM 19:00
141 JOINT CREW NEWS CONFERENCE REPLAY (with English Interpretation) JSC 08/ 21:54 03:30 PM 04:30 PM 20:30
142 EVA # 4 PROCEDURE REVIEW 08/ 23:00 04:36 PM 05:36 PM 21:36
143 EVA # 4 CAMPOUT BEGINS (Williams & Anderson) 09/ 00:55 06:31 PM 07:31 PM 23:31
144 ISS CREW SLEEP BEGINS 09/ 02:00 07:36 PM 08:36 PM 00:36
144 ENDEAVOUR CREW SLEEP BEGINS 09/ 02:30 08:06 PM 09:06 PM 01:06
145 FLIGHT DAY 10 HIGHLIGHTS (replayed on the hour during crew sleep) JSC 09/ 03:24 09:00 PM 10:00 PM 02:00

Go4EVA!
2007-Aug-17, 12:46 PM
And we know Mastracchio has his spare pair aboard, and I assume the others do, too, at least among the regularly scheduled spacewalkers.

I wonder what happens to those gloves after an astronaut leaves NASA. Are they retirement gifts? Do they save them in case a new astronaut comes along who happens to take exactly the same shape. Or do they, like, donate the gloves to impoverished 3rd-world space programs?


Yes, each crewmember that has been EVA-trained, will have prime and back-up pairs of gloves on board.

As was mentioned previously, the gloves are indeed "custom made" to fit the primary contours of each crewmember's hand, but they are ALSO "adjustable" in certain ways which does provide the ability for others to (sometimes) re-use the same gloves on future EVAs, in vacuum-chamber testing on the ground, or for crew training in the neutral buoyancy laboratory underwater. (Trust me, the gloves stay in the NASA inventory for a long time.)

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-17, 12:51 PM
Hi, I understand. To me, it might be like having a partially broken fuel line
on a car's engine compartment. It's leaking gas.
Well; Going with that analogy, I would say it's more like a chaffed or cracked line that isn't leaking gas. It looks strong enough to make it to the garage, and fiddling with it might break it, or the wires or something around it.


As far as the temperature question goes. I'm sure with the time constraints, anything said would probably not be quite right.

01101001
2007-Aug-17, 01:21 PM
Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Not much going on now. Al Drew is debugging hardware in space: trying to isolate problems in shuttle audio when they are docked, probing various connectors with a scopemeter to see if signal looks right. Holds meter up to camera. "How does this square wave look?"

It's not so exciting in space, today.

Edit: 2 hours later, I tune in again and they're talking about pins and connectors and Al Drew and waveforms.

Edit: 30 minutes later... video closeups of waveforms on the scopemeter. Might be some model of Fluke ScopeMeter portable oscilloscope. Current Fluke models on the web all appear to have color displays, but it's not easy to browse their site. This might be an older B&W model certified for shuttle use. I'm not a heavy user of portables, so I can't say I recognize the display format. It's not unlike some pictured at Fluke. It's too much of a closeup now to view the device case. As I recall it wasn't yellow. It was sort of PDA-sized.

Edit: ALERT I am 90-percent positive it is a Fluke. When the device was moved before the camera, I believe I saw the Fluke logo above the display. It was low-res, but very much likely to have been a Fluke. Stand by for further news...

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-17, 03:58 PM
I'm glad it's a boring day, I'll be at spacefest all day meeting the BA, 1/2 a dozen Apollo astronauts, and some of the coolest science giants around these days. :) Boring means I'm not missing much.