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nitsualien
2002-Feb-27, 04:02 PM
When I was still in my teens, and probably very bored, I had a "revelation" regarding the nature of gravity and matter and such.

Some of this borders on crackpot, and I've since abandoned the idea for any serious purposes, but I thought it might be useful for a science fiction story or two, so I'd be thrilled to get some comments. Bear with me, and forgive any spelling mistakes.

The universe is filled with uncountable, indistiguishable particles, nearly infintesmal in size. Unlike Aether, which merely permeates matter, these particles (which my brother dubbed monads,) form matter.

Both matter and vacuum are composed of monads, the difference being patterns of motion. Empty space has its "empty" quality because the monads which compose it move randomly, e.g. with no defining pattern. Matter, which we know to be composed of atoms, protons, electrons, quarks, etc, have distinct properties [of which this theory really only accounts for gravity... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif ] because they are in fact complex, self perpetuating monad waveforms.

To provide a simple example [ because I never had a more complex one ], imagine an electrically neutral partical, somewhat akin to a neutron, floating isolated in space. According to this theory, the neutron can be visualized as spherical monad wave, centered on a point, pulsating in space (our monad soup which fills the universe.)

Not very exciting, yet.

If you introduce a second neutron, things get interesting [relatively speaking.] Because both are spherical waves, we see that monads which compose these waves travel in parallel along a line connecting the center points of the neutrons, and roughly parallel within a few degrees of this line.

In essence, between the two neutrons we have found a region of linear movement, and in surrounding areas the chaotic movement continues. The region of linear space between these neutrons allows monads to travel much easier along the axis of motion [it just does, okay?], decreasing the monadal pressure between the two particles, while the vacuum pressure outside of this region remains the same.

Thus the neutrons are "pushed" together in an action which resembles gravity. [ I never bothered to model this mathematically. ]

Interestingly enough, when the neutrons draw close together, the linear region shrinks, and is offset by a region of perpendicular motion which increasingly repels the two particles. Weak Nuclear force perhaps? [ Probably not. ] If that didn't make sense, draw two points on a paper, with a series of lines extending radially from each point. If the points are far enough away, the radial lines are parallel for the most part between the two points, but if they are too close, the parallelism is overwhelmed by nearly perpendicular lines.

It also helps to assume that the spherical waveform decays as it extends beyond the central point, perhaps due to interaction with the surrounding chaotic movement.

Anyone crazy enough to extend the theory (as described so far) to explain electromagnetism gets a virtual scooby-snack.

I also attempted to use the theory to explain certain aspects of relativity -- this will be brief, because I'm getting bored already. Anyway, a particle traveling through the monad soup at relativistic speeds generates a shockwave-quasiparticle which it pushes ahead of itself -- the closer to c the particle travels, the larger the quasiparticle becomes; the quasiparticle also has mass, which increases exponentially with velocity [ convenient, isn't that? ] so that a traveling particle appears to increase in mass as it accelerates toward c. The quasi particle also has the effect of buffering the space immediately behind it from the the random motion of the universe at large. This buffering effect is also proportional to velocity, so that a particle traveling a c would be completely isolated from the rest of the universe. Such a particle would appear to blink out of existence from the perspective of a relatively stationary observer, and blink back into existence where ever it's velocity decreases below c. Because the particle traveling in this manner is subjected to less of the random monadal motion than the rest of the universe, any processes which depend on those motions are proportionally slowed, thus fitting nicely into the twin paradox.

At a stretch, if you assume that the velocity of the quasiparticle is an innate property, and that the quasiparticle has mass (as described in the first example,) then this theory may also explain momentum -- a particle is simply dragged along by it's quasiparticle twin.

Anyway, I know the above has more problems than the plot to Tomb Raider, but since I'm openly admitting it's bunk, I'd still be thrilled if anyone would like to comment, or take the ball and run with it far enough to attempt to explain more natural phenomena with this theory. Have fun!

2002-Feb-27, 04:22 PM
<a name="20020227.9:48"> page 20020227.9:48 aka MoNa
On 2002-02-27 11:02, nitsualien wrote: To:6 OC 8 KAYAB
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Not very exciting, yet.
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9:50 A.M. HUb' oddles & oddles of lines 2B reEd`ed about 30 maybe

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HUb' on 2002-06-30 23:52 ]</font>

nitsualien
2002-Feb-27, 04:30 PM
Nevermind -- I just noticed my theory looks alot like that "sea of garbage... er, light" theory elsewhere on this board.

Wiley
2002-Feb-27, 04:39 PM
On 2002-02-27 11:30, nitsualien wrote:
Nevermind -- I just noticed my theory looks alot like that "sea of garbage... er, light" theory elsewhere on this board.


Hmmm...

It was beginning to seem like Bohm's ever pervasive field of quantum potential...

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

John Kierein
2002-Feb-27, 05:23 PM
The new book "Pushing Gravity" edited by Matt Edwards of U. of Toronto, will be out very shortly. It gives an update to Lesage & Brush's ideas in a modern context. When it comes out be sure to get one. You'll love it!!! (Especially since I have a paper in it.)

Pi Man
2002-Jun-30, 03:15 AM
I also thought I came up with something big(though not a TOE.) I sent it to somebody at Columbia University, and it got hacked to shreds!

John Kierein
2002-Jun-30, 01:51 PM
On 2002-06-29 23:15, Pi Man wrote:
I also thought I came up with something big(though not a TOE.) I sent it to somebody at Columbia University, and it got hacked to shreds!


My experience is that they'll hack anything that doesn't agree with today's latest theory, especially if you are an unknown. But the fact that they felt they had to respond suggests that you might have been on to something that gave them pause.

(There a very few exceptions to this, like Chandrasekhar.)

Pi Man
2002-Jun-30, 06:35 PM
On 2002-06-30 09:51, John Kierein wrote:

My experience is that they'll hack anything that doesn't agree with today's latest theory, especially if you are an unknown. But the fact that they felt they had to respond suggests that you might have been on to something that gave them pause.

(There a very few exceptions to this, like Chandrasekhar.)


Thanx. That makes me feel better! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif