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George
2007-Aug-16, 09:37 PM
What is the best way to get all my programs and data from an old computer onto a new hard drive of a new computer? I would like to be able to clean up any junk files, viruses, etc., too.

mugaliens
2007-Aug-16, 10:34 PM
Assuming you're using Windows, simply install the old hard drive into the new computer and copy whatever's in your old folders into your new folders. This way you can copy only what you want and leave the "junk" behind, but have it there just in case.

If you're installing an old EIDE drive into an ATA computer and there's no EIDE cables, no worries, as cheap EIDE expansion cards are available for PCI slots.

Moose
2007-Aug-16, 10:37 PM
Normally, the best way is to burn your data and downloaded programs to DVDs or CDs. You will need to reinstall your programs. Any applications that are already on CD/DVD will not need to be backed up separately. This requires fewer DVDs or CDs, but you risk forgetting some data somewhere that you'll need. If you hang onto your old computer for a bit, this isn't as important.

Then reinstall windows on the new machine, then the programs, then replace the data.

Your other option is to burn your entire drive onto DVDs, section by section. Reinstall windows, your software, then get your data from the backups as you need it. This requires (considerably) more DVDs or CDs, but you'll have it all with you if you need it later. You won't need to hang onto the old machine this way.

Van Rijn
2007-Aug-16, 10:42 PM
Key questions are: How handy are you with hardware, and what are the old and new computers and drives? That is, are they both PCs, are they all EIDE, etc.

If I'm dealing with IDE hardware, similar to what mugs is saying, I set up the old drive (which normally has substantially lower capacity from the new) as a slave (by moving a jumper), set up an "archive" folder on the new, larger master drive, set up sub folders with names like "old_computer_drive_c" (though more descriptive) and start copying. Or I just leave the drive as a slave and keep using it.

Van Rijn
2007-Aug-16, 10:46 PM
Then reinstall windows on the new machine, then the programs, then replace the data.


I missed this part. George, you must reinstall Windows first on the new drive and reinstall Windows programs. It's almost impossible to get Windows and most Windows programs configured for one machine to work on another simply by transferring them. Data files (music, video, documents, spreadsheets, etc.) or old DOS programs if you have any, are another matter.

Moose
2007-Aug-16, 10:58 PM
Yup. The other complication in this method is if you install both drives at the same time before installing windows on the new machine.

In some configurations, the wrong windows will boot, or windows will try to repartition (and erase) both drives. Basically, if you're not familiar with the difference between "cable select" and "master/slave" on the IDE interface, and what that means in terms of cabling, then unpredictable things that lead to data loss can happen. Or not. The conditions that make this sort of fiasco possible are far more likely on mass-production machines (Dell, Compaq, etc.)

This is why I nearly always recommend the DVD-burn method. Harder to get into trouble that way. My assumption is if one has to ask, this is the way to do it.

Van Rijn
2007-Aug-16, 11:13 PM
This is why I nearly always recommend the DVD-burn method. Harder to get into trouble that way. My assumption is if one has to ask, this is the way to do it.

Sure, that works, but it does depend on how much data you have. If it isn't much, I'd go that route. For me, though . . . well, my next box is going to break the terabyte barrier, and I'm almost there now. (Heh, I still remember when I first had more than 1 gigabyte of disk capacity in a single PC, and even when I had 140K floppies.)

hhEb09'1
2007-Aug-17, 12:21 AM
What is the best way to get all my programs and data from an old computer onto a new hard drive of a new computer? I would like to be able to clean up any junk files, viruses, etc., too.Since you probably have an ethernet connection on the old computer, as well as the new, just get a crossover cable and plug it into both machines. Viola! they're networked, and can make music together. You can copy files at speeds faster than burning CDs even probably.

You have to make sure of a few settings, but that's not hard. Let's see, this page (http://www.practicallynetworked.com/qa/qa20030213.shtml) seems OK, it's not as complicated as it looks.

Don't just use an ordinary cable, the wires have to be crossed. Do they make a crossover plug that you can stick on the end of an ordinary cable?

Moose
2007-Aug-17, 12:50 AM
Yes, such a thing exists, although I've only ever seen home-brew jobs. It's often called a "poor man's hub". I've seen one made by wiring a network wall-plate and letting it dangle between the two machines.

Considering cheap hubs cost about the same as actual crossover cables (unless you make one yourself) and is much more common, a cheap hub may be a better option if there's a lot of data involved. This is a pretty safe option as well. Pretty easy, too.

Hint: you'll find everything you need to make the link under "my network places" or "network neighborhood". But you should not be connected to the net when you do this, or else have some experience with your firewall. There are security implications with enabling SMB ports (aka: directory sharing). Make sure you turn file sharing off before you reconnect to the net.

George
2007-Aug-17, 02:15 AM
Thanks for all the responses. Back when the drives were 40 megs, it was a cinch.


Since you probably have an ethernet connection on the old computer, as well as the new, just get a crossover cable and plug it into both machines. Viola! they're networked, and can make music together. You can copy files at speeds faster than burning CDs even probably.
A crossover cable with an Ethernet plug? Ok. That is what I was hoping to hear since it is what I used to do with a special serial cable years ago. [I've already forgoten what we called that transfer cable.]

Yet, even with this I had a cheap program giving me split screen view of files. It was simple to move files across from one side to another, master to slave.

I'll get some good cleaning software and then try the transfers.

Both computers are typical PCs with Windows. The new one has some new type of hard drive, I think, that begins with an S, but I assume the FAT files are the same format, or is there a transfer problem awaiting me? [I remember the first letter of the hard drive is an S only because I remember the SCSI drives when they came out. :) Obviously, I wasn't paying much attention because the computer I purchased is not for me, and the seller is trustworthy. What they sold me greatly exceeds the need.

Van Rijn
2007-Aug-17, 03:39 AM
Thanks for all the responses. Back when the drives were 40 megs, it was a cinch.


A crossover cable with an Ethernet plug? Ok. That is what I was hoping to hear since it is what I used to do with a special serial cable years ago. [I've already forgoten what we called that transfer cable.]

Yet, even with this I had a cheap program giving me split screen view of files. It was simple to move files across from one side to another, master to slave.


Sounds like Laplink. Interestingly, they still sell transfer software, though I haven't worked with recent stuff.



Both computers are typical PCs with Windows. The new one has some new type of hard drive, I think, that begins with an S, but I assume the FAT files are the same format, or is there a transfer problem awaiting me?
[I remember the first letter of the hard drive is an S only because I remember the SCSI drives when they came out. :) Obviously, I wasn't paying much attention because the computer I purchased is not for me, and the seller is trustworthy. What they sold me greatly exceeds the need.

Almost certainly a SATA drive. File formats are the same where it counts. However, unless the older machine is running Windows 9X, it's unlikely either uses FAT, but NTFS instead.

DOOMMaster
2007-Aug-17, 04:33 AM
T
A crossover cable with an Ethernet plug? Ok. That is what I was hoping to hear since it is what I used to do with a special serial cable years ago. [I've already forgoten what we called that transfer cable.]

I believe you are looking for a null modem cable here. They were very effective back in the day, when you wanted to transfer files or play old DOS games between 2 computers. I used to do it with DOOM all the time (imagine that!).

I agree with the ethernet option as probably your best bet. It's quick, easy with a crossover cable, and you don't have to delete anything off the old computer. Course, you will still have to install all the windows programs, but if you have data in the ones installed on your old comp, you can usually install the program on the new comp, then copy the folder with all the data from your old one.

Most of the time it'll work just fine, only rarely will you run into one of those programs that it will screw up. That's how I get all my games to a new computer from an old one. Saves me the trouble of losing all my saved game data and custom setups.

hhEb09'1
2007-Aug-17, 09:24 AM
Considering cheap hubs cost about the same as actual crossover cables (unless you make one yourself) and is much more common, a cheap hub may be a better option if there's a lot of data involved. This is a pretty safe option as well. Pretty easy, too. I was actually about to suggest this, in addition, in my post, but I thought I might as well leave it at one option at a time.

Not that George couldn't handle it :)

Maksutov
2007-Aug-17, 10:18 AM
Since I take it your new computer has a hard drive with the OS already installed, then add your old drive as a "slave".

IDE drives need to be reset through jumpers to do this, the more recent SATA drives are auto.

Then copy your data as you see fit.

Forget about copying most applications, since, except for some simple DOS and early Windows apps, they will need to reinstalled. The Windows registry is very particular about such things.

Moose
2007-Aug-17, 12:01 PM
I believe you are looking for a null modem cable here. They were very effective back in the day, when you wanted to transfer files or play old DOS games between 2 computers. I used to do it with DOOM all the time (imagine that!).

Me too. Thing with a null modem is that they're hard to find (these days), relatively expensive and much slower than any other option you've got.

Speaking, yet another option is a thumb drive (or USB .mp3 player). My work machine is about to be rebuilt. There's a fair bit of data to transfer, and my network crawlspaces are too small for what I need it to do. But my .mp3 player has 1.25 gigs. Plenty for my needs.

George
2007-Aug-17, 01:12 PM
Sounds like Laplink. Interestingly, they still sell transfer software, though I haven't worked with recent stuff. Yes, I now recall using that one.


Almost certainly a SATA drive. File formats are the same where it counts. Yep, SATA is the name. [They delayed computer delivery a week while they awaited their arrival, so I assume they are the lattest and greatest, at least till next month.]


However, unless the older machine is running Windows 9X, it's unlikely either uses FAT, but NTFS instead. Thanks, I'll check to be sure.


I believe you are looking for a null modem cable here. Perhaps, and I recall using one, too. However, the first ones I thought began with a B (bipolar??). [Hmmmm, seems like I'm down to one byte per name. Hopefully, I can still store all 26 characters. :) Give me a couple a years and I'll host a computer term quiz giving only the first letter. ;)]


They were very effective back in the day, when you wanted to transfer files or play old DOS games between 2 computers. I used to do it with DOOM all the time (imagine that!). :) I didn't link till Red Alert.


Course, you will still have to install all the windows programs,.. Both have windows installed, so it seems I may need to only install the original program installation disks. There used to be a mirror program that would duplicate everything and eliminate this step. Those days seem gone. Finding the old disks could be a problem, I fear.



Considering cheap hubs cost about the same as actual crossover cables (unless you make one yourself) and is much more common, a cheap hub may be a better option if there's a lot of data involved. This is a pretty safe option as well. Pretty easy, too.

I was actually about to suggest this, in addition, in my post, but I thought I might as well leave it at one option at a time.

Not that George couldn't handle it :) In reading your reference site, as soon as I saw this new term "hub" I immediately skipped over it. I have this sense that something with the name HUB will end up more cryptic than my cyperhing can handle. ;)

There isn't that much data transfer required, but I plan to do more than one computer upgrade.


Since I take it your new computer has a hard drive with the OS already installed, then add your old drive as a "slave". Yes, I have done this in the past, but I want to clean up the old one and sell, or give, the computer to someone who needs it.

Moose
2007-Aug-17, 01:29 PM
Both have windows installed, so it seems I may need to only install the original program installation disks. There used to be a mirror program that would duplicate everything and eliminate this step. Those days seem gone. Finding the old disks could be a problem, I fear.

It's called Ghost. It's still floating around (pun intended).

The thing is, partition imaging is really only useful to back up a base installation to be applied to the same machine, or to be used on machines with identical characteristics. Not all characteristics have to be identical, but it's generally not recommended for machines with different motherboards.

For data transfers, it merely adds another step.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-17, 01:48 PM
Originally Posted by Maksutov
Since I take it your new computer has a hard drive with the OS already installed, then add your old drive as a "slave".
Yes, I have done this in the past, but I want to clean up the old one and sell, or give, the computer to someone who needs it.Once you've transfered all your unique, useful data from the old drive to the new, you can then fdisk/format the old one and it will be ready for use in someone's else's computer.

If you have really sensitive data on it, then there are many free "wipe disk" programs out there that will eliminate the possibility of any data being retrieved from it.

George
2007-Aug-17, 02:23 PM
Once you've transfered all your unique, useful data from the old drive to the new, you can then fdisk/format the old one and it will be ready for use in someone's else's computer.
Are you saying I can still open DOS and use the old command "format C:" without huriting the OS?


If you have really sensitive data on it, then there are many free "wipe disk" programs out there that will eliminate the possibility of any data being retrieved from it. If I can do the above, I'll be happy enough.

Moose
2007-Aug-17, 03:00 PM
Are you saying I can still open DOS and use the old command "format C:" without huriting the OS?

No, he's not saying that at all. But you said you wanted to clean up, get rid of viruses, etc, after you'd moved to the new machine. Best way to do that is to reformat and reinstall the OS.

If you intend on keeping the OS intact, your ability to clean up will necessarily be somewhat limited.

jfribrg
2007-Aug-17, 03:25 PM
I'll throw in my two cents. I had a couple of old computers where the motherboard died but the disks were fine. I bought a couple of external drive cases that came with USB connections and turned them into external drives. In my case, these disks were 250GB each and I didn't want to lose all that space. I'm not sure I even needed to change the jumper to turn it into a master drive. When I plug in the USB cable, my computer thinks it's a giant thumb drive.

mugaliens
2007-Aug-18, 02:44 AM
Sure, that works, but it does depend on how much data you have. If it isn't much, I'd go that route. For me, though . . . well, my next box is going to break the terabyte barrier, and I'm almost there now. (Heh, I still remember when I first had more than 1 gigabyte of disk capacity in a single PC, and even when I had 140K floppies.)

Gotcha beat - my first PC had a 30 MB hard drive and a 360k floppy.

It took upward of 70 floppies to back up my hard drive.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-18, 08:02 AM
Gotcha beat.

The first computer I built for myself during the 1980s had no hard drive, but a real luxury: TWO 5.25" 360K DSDD drives. The A drive was for loading DOS 2.X and programs, the B drive was for data storage.

It had an ISA all-the-way motherboard with a blazingly fast CPU (8088 or 8086, I forget) that could be pushed by engaging a "turbo" (Battlecomputer Galactica!) switch to a blindingly fast 8MHz.

Things got really fast when I spent about $110 on a math coprocessor!

mugaliens
2007-Aug-18, 11:00 AM
Gotcha beat! The computer I set up for my uncle (still a widely published author) consisted of a single 180k floppy, 64k ram, and some word processing program which he sweared by for the next five years.

Gotcha beat! I set up an Atari (?)in 1982 for the store in which I worked. Don't know if anyone bought one - it was a pos.

mugaliens
2007-Aug-18, 11:00 AM
Gotcha beat.

The first computer I built for myself during the 1980s had no hard drive, but a real luxury: TWO 5.25" 360K DSDD drives. The A drive was for loading DOS 2.X and programs, the B drive was for data storage.

It had an ISA all-the-way motherboard with a blazingly fast CPU (8088 or 8086, I forget) that could be pushed by engaging a "turbo" (Battlecomputer Galactica!) switch to a blindingly fast 8MHz.

Things got really fast when I spent about $110 on a math coprocessor!

HA! I did the same with my 8086, and it doubled the speed of math computations, but nothing else.

Moose
2007-Aug-18, 12:49 PM
(8088 or 8086, I forget)

8086. The 8088 was the wimpy nerfed version.

Moose
2007-Aug-18, 12:55 PM
Gotcha beat! The computer I set up for my uncle (still a widely published author) consisted of a single 180k floppy, 64k ram, and some word processing program which he sweared by for the next five years.

Gotcha beat.

TRS-80 COCO-2 (the Tandy version) with 32K ram (only about 6K usable by the user). I (eventually) had a single-sided floppy drive (which meant you flipped the floppy to access side two.)

But, when my folks got it for me, it didn't occur to them that I'd ever need storage of any kind. No floppy. No tape drive. Which meant I could run programs only so long as I could keep the machine turned on. After three months of '10 print "hello-world", 20 goto 10', we finally found a tape drive (not the official one) with line-in and mic capability, so I was set.

My granddad had you beat in two words: "Sears Pong".

Actually, a college buddy of mine has everybody beat. In 1991 and 1992, he would log into the college network and access the internet through a VAX. His client hardware was the old Tandy TRS-80 model 100 (http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?c=233) with 8KB RAM. He later upgraded to a machine running CPM off its single floppy.

I've MUDded off of both machines. (Not effectively, and not seriously. Neither machine ever had anything better than a 300 baud modem.)

JohnBStone
2007-Aug-18, 08:31 PM
New PCs have SATA hard drives with small connector cables, whereas old PCs have IDE (PATA) drives with the wide ribbon cable.

Many new PCs have a spare drive bay and a PATA connector, just look for the wide grey ribbon cable and the power connector and plug in as a slave. Then you also have an inbuilt drive for doing regular backups to, which you are more likely to keep up to date.

George
2007-Aug-18, 10:33 PM
Moose, you had to bring up the Trash 80, as it was commonly known. It was more functional, however, than the 16 bit TI unit that was finally dumped on the market for about $49. The cassette tape drive and monitor, though necessary, was extra, of course. I might still have it, along with my Odyssey game unit, and Apple II.

When the IBM AT hit the market we grabbed one for about $6,500. I could be wrong, but I vaguelly recall wishing I hadn't rushed into it because they quickly came out with a 20 meg drive in lieu of the 10 meg I got.

jfribrg
2007-Aug-19, 03:03 AM
How did this turn into the "Gotcha beat" game, but I like it. Maybe a moderator will need to move it to the "Fun and Games" section. Anyway, its my turn so,

Gotcha beat.

COCO 4K ram, and only permanent storage was a cassette tape player.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-19, 05:31 AM
Gotcha beat.

In 1973 I procured an HP 9820A desktop computer (http://www.hpmuseum.org/hp9820.htm) (still called a "calculator" back then) for use in my job as quality control supervisor at North American Philips Controls Corp. The product line was DC motors for the Polaroid SX-70 (and later models) camera. Due to the volumes involved, etc., we needed to be able to crunch a lot of numbers quickly to make sure the various processes were in control.

In addition to the basic unit, I also bought the printer, the tape drive, the plotter, and the math plug-in (literally a hardware plug-in). This allowed me to publish reports which included plots of data for various parameters with not only histograms but also curve-fitted standard distributions, along with the allied stat data.

Daily reports allowed us to catch variations in such things as commutator location, brush alignment, glue adhesion, etc., before they exceeded tolerances for a properly functioning motor.

I'm sure all of that would lost in today's manufacturing environment, where the catch phrase is "Ship It!! (from our facility in China)...


Meanwhile, how's the data transfer going, George?

George
2007-Aug-19, 06:57 PM
Gotcha beat.

In 1973 I procured an HP 9820A desktop computer (http://www.hpmuseum.org/hp9820.htm) (still called a "calculator" back then) for use in my job as quality control supervisor at North American Philips Controls Corp. The product line was DC motors for the Polaroid SX-70 (and later models) camera. Due to the volumes involved, etc., we needed to be able to crunch a lot of numbers quickly to make sure the various processes were in control.
Hmmmm, so were now all the way back to '73.

Ok, Gottcha! In '73, we built a fluidic computer that would do basic math functions. The memory was probably about 0.008k; we used several coffee cans for air storage for the positive bit (I think). You can guess its pointless speed.

I think it was '72 when I bought one of the first TI hand calculators. It was advertised with scientific functions and the Austin salesman said he assumed it would have trig. functions. I paid $160+ for it in advance, but it had no trig. functions. [So, do I have to hear about the HP which slightly preceeded the TI? They were eventually banned in engineering class during testing. :)]



Meanwhile, how's the data transfer going, George? Stalled. There is no rush and my fires are many at the moment. Also, I want to read-up on the hub idea. Where is HUB, anyway? ;)

Moose
2007-Aug-19, 07:57 PM
Gotcha. Yeah, so there I was, with this abacus computing Pi to its first significant digit, when all of a sudden it all clicked into place. (*drum and cymbals*)

toejam
2007-Aug-19, 09:13 PM
Gotcha all!!!

Because I don't know jack about computers & my first one, this one, with nominal 80 GB disk space & Windows XP on it, is getting rapidly filled up mainly because of massive downloads of music on it. Have a Maxtor 300 GB external drive, USB connected, that I use as back up.

Questions:

1. IF, (& it's a big IF) I ever want to transfer data, music & all, to a new computer can I use the external drive to do it?
2.Heard that Windows XP will only work on the computer it was originally installed in, so what happens in a transfer? Will it work? Or jam the new works? Will it update as it is doing at present?
3.Are all these stupid questions?

Don't know any computer nerds here in the "bush" who could help me, that's why I'm wasting your time. :)

Moose
2007-Aug-20, 01:01 AM
1. IF, (& it's a big IF) I ever want to transfer data, music & all, to a new computer can I use the external drive to do it?

Data yes: Your external drive may well be the easiest way of all to transfer large amounts of data from one machine to another.

Windows no: As I've mentioned earlier this thread, it's generally best to avoid transferring windows (or applications) between machines with different motherboards.


2.Heard that Windows XP will only work on the computer it was originally installed in, so what happens in a transfer? Will it work? Or jam the new works? Will it update as it is doing at present?

Worst case, it'll require you to phone Microsoft to reset your activation code. Reports are that this is relatively hassle-free, but still, overall, your wisest move is to transfer your data while reinstalling both windows and your applications.


3.Are all these stupid questions?

Cheesy saying: "The only stupid question is the unasked one."


Don't know any computer nerds here in the "bush" who could help me, that's why I'm wasting your time. :)

You say that like any of us have something better to do with our time. :D

toejam
2007-Aug-20, 07:27 PM
Thanks Moose.

Question 4:

If I want to choke my hard drive with even more music, from my collection of vinyl records, is this easy? My stereo & computer are in different rooms, about 30 feet apart and almost impossible to move nearer. Thanks again.

Moose
2007-Aug-20, 07:56 PM
30 feet is a bit far for that sort of thing, IIRC. You don't really need the whole stereo. Just hauling the phonograph closer should be plenty. I'm pretty sure (but only pretty sure) you don't even need an amp to do this if you're under 6 feet away. You'll need an Split-RCA-to-(single)-stereo connector, which goes into the line-in of your computer's audio card.

If you can beg or swipe a digital recorder, it makes a really good sneakernet to get around distance limitations.

Then you'll need half-decent recording software, so you can play the whole record then clip out the tracks at your leisure. There's good freeware out there if you're willing to go looking for it. If your sound card is by Live!, you probably have something fair-to-good on a CD stashed away somewhere. Although technically, you can manage with windows sound recorder in a pinch.

hhEb09'1
2007-Aug-21, 10:59 AM
Me too. Thing with a null modem is that they're hard to find (these days), relatively expensive and much slower than any other option you've got. Why would that be? Wouldn't the limiting speed there just be of the computers themselves?

Stalled. There is no rush and my fires are many at the moment. Also, I want to read-up on the hub idea. Where is HUB, anyway? ;)That's HUb' :)

Maksutov
2007-Aug-21, 11:22 AM
Thanks Moose.

Question 4:

If I want to choke my hard drive with even more music, from my collection of vinyl records, is this easy? My stereo & computer are in different rooms, about 30 feet apart and almost impossible to move nearer. Thanks again.I've been using my Denon turntable (with a cable as Moose described, it's the same one I use for audio when transferring VHS to DVD) and GoldWave (http://www.goldwave.com/) software for a number of years. Works quite well.

With GoldWave I can even adjust the pitch of those LPs that were recorded "fast" to squeeze a 32 minute piece into one side. As well as increasing the inherently compressed dynamics in a way that is audibly acceptable.

Plus it's nice to support well-written shareware.

Moose
2007-Aug-21, 03:38 PM
Why would that be? Wouldn't the limiting speed there just be of the computers themselves?

Yes, that's exactly where the bottleneck is. It's a function of the serial port's limitations, not so much the cable itself.

There's a reason you can't find null modems anymore.

Basic 10-baseT networking is a lot faster and cheaper than using a serial port to network your machines. And most 20-dollar cards are 10/100-baseT anyway.

Considering all of your options (and we haven't even gotten into the USB and Firewire solutions in this thread), a link using a null modem should be pretty low on the list.

George
2007-Aug-21, 05:22 PM
Why would that be? Wouldn't the limiting speed there just be of the computers themselves?That's HUb' :) Yes, sorry I wasn't stating it in original machine code. ;)

hhEb09'1
2007-Aug-22, 05:01 PM
Yes, that's exactly where the bottleneck is. It's a function of the serial port's limitations, not so much the cable itself.

There's a reason you can't find null modems anymore.

Basic 10-baseT networking is a lot faster and cheaper than using a serial port to network your machines. And most 20-dollar cards are 10/100-baseT anyway.

Considering all of your options (and we haven't even gotten into the USB and Firewire solutions in this thread), a link using a null modem should be pretty low on the list.Do computers have serial ports nowadays? :)

I was talking about (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/63532-old-new-computer-data-transfer.html#post1050748) an ethernet crossover, which should communicate at the speed of the 10/100-base T cards.

Here (http://www.makeitsimple.com/how-to/dyi_crossover.htm)'s a little DIY page, looks like they're attaching the RJ-45 plug (50 cents, and you vandalize an old cable) with screwdrivers. Why spend two hundred dollars on a crimper? :)

I've never had to do this--I have hubs stacked all over the place--but I don't see why it wouldn't work for George.

Moose
2007-Aug-22, 05:21 PM
Do computers have serial ports nowadays? :)

Yep. Nobody really uses 'em anymore, but they still exist.


I was talking about (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/63532-old-new-computer-data-transfer.html#post1050748) an ethernet crossover, which should communicate at the speed of the 10/100-base T cards.

Ah. 'Cause you'd quoted my mention of a null modem without clarifying your pronoun. Good to know.


Here (http://www.makeitsimple.com/how-to/dyi_crossover.htm)'s a little DIY page, looks like they're attaching the RJ-45 plug (50 cents, and you vandalize an old cable) with screwdrivers. Why spend two hundred dollars on a crimper? :)

Man, I can't even attach the head of a cat-5 with a crimper. My hands weren't built with that sort of resolution in mind. I know lots of people who cut cat-5 on a daily basis. It's (apparently) not hard.


I've never had to do this--I have hubs stacked all over the place--but I don't see why it wouldn't work for George.

Yup. Both options works the same. It's just a matter of which is easier/cheaper to get your mitts on.

mugaliens
2007-Aug-22, 08:15 PM
Gotcha all!!!

Because I don't know jack about computers & my first one, this one, with nominal 80 GB disk space & Windows XP on it, is getting rapidly filled up mainly because of massive downloads of music on it. Have a Maxtor 300 GB external drive, USB connected, that I use as back up.

Toejam, there's a solution for your problem. It's called soap.

In the meantime:




Questions:

1. IF, (& it's a big IF) I ever want to transfer data, music & all, to a new computer can I use the external drive to do it?
2.Heard that Windows XP will only work on the computer it was originally installed in, so what happens in a transfer? Will it work? Or jam the new works? Will it update as it is doing at present?
3.Are all these stupid questions?

Don't know any computer nerds here in the "bush" who could help me, that's why I'm wasting your time. :)

Just to lightspeed beyond this stuff and show the youngins that we're not really the black holes of thought they think we are, I'd like to introduce a few ideas totally not on the grid these days which might reset their synapses.

1. Total media integration. Terrific. Microsoft lead it with Windows 95 Media Center Edition. Total Flop. I'm doing it with Windows XP, SPDIF, Soundblaster, Yamaha, etc. All components, one centralized media.

2. Storage. Just bought a serial ATA card and three hard drives for more than 1 TB of storage via RAID 5. Yep. More than my entire University had in 1988.

For less than $800.

3. Sound. Already tripping on my DTS Yahama receiver (five years old, plays today's DTS sound via SPDIF input.

4. Video. Getting the latest in nVidia graphics (THE leader).

5. Audio. Soundlblaster. Whatever the latest is, I'll get it. They just do good work.

Upgrading drives (original poster, pay attention): There are always ways to make older drives show up in new systems. Simply follow them and copy old files to new folders. It's easy if you kept everything in My Folders. If not, then things are more difficult.

toejam
2007-Aug-23, 09:44 PM
Thanks everyone.

Mugs -- tried soap but the name's stuck to me since I was 13 & that's longer than I care to say -- longer than most on this thread have walked the earth i dare say. Too complicated to explain.

George
2007-Aug-24, 11:50 PM
I bought PCMover because it is from the old LapLink company. Van Rijn's earlier post reminded me of the good old days and nostalgia of the simpler user friendly environment.

My expectation was to load it, connect the USB, and see a split screen for master and slave. But Noooo, it is not simple no more. Shoot!

I had a little trouble installing on the new unit, but it was minor. During the install, I became a bit confussed about what was going on, but realized it wanted a validation number. Since neither unit were internet capable, I had to call LapLink.

My first call got me the validation number. After the digitial operator gave me the choices, I quickly got a real life person who was reasonably nice and pretty intelligent. [Calling late Friday probably didn't hurt my timing.]

After entering the secret validation, the computers failed to talk to each other. My second call informed me that I needed to reverse the USB cable. Who would have guessed that one? But, it worked. Then it wanted to transfer the entire old stuff over to the new unit in a giant compressed file. I stopped the transfer. Since I only want files of my choice, I was told to download a file that they offered as of yesterday, which would allow me to transfer folders from one to another.

I am doing a disk scan on the old system and will try it again tomorrow.

BTW, this new unit has Windows Professional on it. Why? Because with this higher dollar version, and minor tweaking, I can run full screen DOS. :wall: