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The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Aug-20, 03:07 PM
I like cheese. Anyone know what makes it taste so good?

Neverfly
2007-Aug-20, 03:09 PM
Are you bored today?

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Aug-20, 03:10 PM
I'm waiting for some downloads to finish so I thought what the heck...

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Aug-20, 03:15 PM
You can guess what my vote was by looking at where I'm from. I'm a cheesehead through and through. (But I don't own one of those silly hats.)

A few generations ago my ancestors owned dairy farms, many of my relatives on my mother's side of the family worked at dairies if they didn't own farms, in short there's cheese in my blood. I was even born in the middle of Wisconsin's cheese land, not far from Colby, home of a world-famous variety of cheddar cheese.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-20, 03:15 PM
Here are my opinions on the subject, as well as those of others. (http://www.bautforum.com/off-topic-babbling/48344-cheese.html#post850444)

Neverfly
2007-Aug-20, 03:21 PM
When you asked what makes it taste so good...
Where you looking for a bilogical chemical formulation for the structure of cheese combined with a dissertation on taste buds and the human brain?

or just opinions?

01101001
2007-Aug-20, 03:30 PM
Anyone know what makes it taste so good?

The fifth taste: umami (Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami)).


Umami is a Japanese word meaning "savory" or "meaty" and thus applies to the sensation of savoriness—specifically, to the detection of glutamates, which are especially common in meats, cheese and other protein-heavy foods.

Neverfly
2007-Aug-20, 03:39 PM
How come I can't vote for cheesecake?

Lianachan
2007-Aug-20, 04:21 PM
Do you get any cheese in the US that isn't squeezable, and from a platic bottle/tube? I like European cheeses. English cheeses like good quality cheddar and stilton in particular.

(This is a genuine question - that's the only US "cheese" I've ever seen)

Donnie B.
2007-Aug-20, 04:23 PM
The US has many fine cheeses, and none of them comes in a squeeze bottle.

No doubt Europe has far greater variety, though. You did pretty much invent the stuff, after all.

mike alexander
2007-Aug-20, 04:24 PM
The process of rotting produces a complex mixture of bacterial waste products. The ability to swallow partially decomposed material represents the triumph of the human mind's ability to put aside the disgusting process involved in its creation, savoring instead the aromatic final product.

So much for politics. I also like cheese.

01101001
2007-Aug-20, 04:25 PM
Do you get any cheese in the US that isn't squeezable, and from a platic bottle/tube? I like European cheeses. English cheeses like good quality cheddar and stilton in particular.

Yeah. European cheeses. English cheeses.

Greek cheeses. South American cheeses. Middle Eastern cheeses. Canadian cheeses. Mexican cheeses. New Zealand cheeses. Even US cheeses. And more. Cheeses.

Fazor
2007-Aug-20, 04:37 PM
The US has many fine cheeses, and none of them comes in a squeeze bottle.
Agreed.
I don't know why the US has this culinary stigma of not having fine, quality ingrediants (cheese included). Of course, it's probably attributed to the fact that any food you can name is available here in highly-processed, grease-laden, canned form.

But the more I get into cooking and fine-dining, the more I'm noticing that many of the high-quality ingrediants are indeed available at my local markets--I just never knew to look for them before. And there's also plenty of specialty markets for the even higher-grade stuff. I'm just too poor to shop at them :-P

pilgrim
2007-Aug-20, 04:37 PM
Blue cheese............................................ ......................................
I love it, always did, it's blue and were it not for its long tradition would probably be classed as a prohibited substance but you can't argue with love.
Camembert isn't bad either. There's a variety I had once which smelled exactly like stale sweaty feet (quite disgusting). I had it in a packed lunch and you could honestly smell it within a 5 metre radius! The moral of the story, be careful what you buy in the Tesco reduced section...

Gillianren
2007-Aug-20, 04:49 PM
The stuff in a squeeze bottle can't even legally be called cheese. Give the US that much credit, at least.

Swift
2007-Aug-20, 04:51 PM
Time for appropriate Wallace and Gromit reference (and even astronomy related)
http://harriettstomato.typepad.com/foodlog/images/wallacecheese_7.jpg

Donnie B.
2007-Aug-20, 05:08 PM
Yes... I refer you back to the other thread (linked above). That applies to both of the last two posts... :)

mugaliens
2007-Aug-20, 06:13 PM
I like cheese. Anyone know what makes it taste so good?

It's the bacteria snot.

At least that's what my nutritionist tells me.

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-20, 06:13 PM
The power of CHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESE!!

The stinkier, the better! I like the fancy ones with the weird fungi and bacteria growing in them, like Humboldt Fog and Stilton.

Yum!!

The only cheeses I can't stomach are Gjetost (don't like sweet cheese--just tastes wrong to me) and Camembert (tastes like puke).

mike alexander
2007-Aug-20, 06:44 PM
The only cheeses I can't stomach are Gjetost (don't like sweet cheese--just tastes wrong to me) and Camembert (tastes like puke).

Yes, but there's a difference; you taste puke coming up, but Camembert going down.

Paracelsus
2007-Aug-20, 06:48 PM
Yes, but there's a difference; you taste puke coming up, but Camembert going down.

BRRRRRRrrrrrrrrrrrr...ickickickickick...ICK

:sick:

Doodler
2007-Aug-20, 07:27 PM
Do you get any cheese in the US that isn't squeezable, and from a platic bottle/tube? I like European cheeses. English cheeses like good quality cheddar and stilton in particular.

(This is a genuine question - that's the only US "cheese" I've ever seen)

Yeah, we gots lots of cheeses we can get that aren't squeezes from a bottle. Not much block cheese, but sliced and shredded is the most common method of sale.

I'm a bit of a cheesehead, though not obsessive.

Swiss, Brie, Mozzarella, Fontina, Sharp Chedder, Provalogne, Ricotta, Cottage, Romana (also called Parmesan) would top out my list of favorites

I've actually never been a big American cheese fan (Not sure if there's a name for it abroad, but there's an "American" style cheese, most often sold in sandwich sized slices. Never seen it any other way)

Gorgonzola (Bleu) cheese and a score of others are available.

Doodler
2007-Aug-20, 07:29 PM
The stuff in a squeeze bottle can't even legally be called cheese. Give the US that much credit, at least.

I remember a comedian riffing on it. "Processed cheese food product. Its not cheese, its cheese [excrement]..." I think it was one of the Wayans brothers from years ago.

Donnie B.
2007-Aug-20, 08:49 PM
Swiss, Brie, Mozzarella, Fontina, Sharp Chedder, Provalogne, Ricotta, Cottage, Romana (also called Parmesan) would top out my list of favorites.
Parmesan and Romano are two different, though similar, kinds of cheese.

Never heard o' that Romana stuff, though... sounds kinda sissy to me. ;)

Provolone is great. I use the milder version in sandwiches. The sharp stuff is for special occasions.

P.S. Could a moderator please fix the title of this thread? It's really bothering Gillian.

Doodler
2007-Aug-20, 08:56 PM
Parmesan and Romano are two different, though similar, kinds of cheese.

Never heard o' that Romana stuff, though... sounds kinda sissy to me. ;)

Provolone is great. I use the milder version in sandwiches. The sharp stuff is for special occasions.

P.S. Could a moderator please fix the title of this thread? It's really bothering Gillian.

FIEND! Tease not the brain damaged on a Monday morning! Our wrathe is furious...when we remember to get around to it...

;)

Whirlpool
2007-Aug-21, 12:30 AM
I like cheese.. actually I loove cheeses... blue cheese, white cheese, yellow cheese...spotted cheese, round cheese ,triangle cheese, square cheese, oblong cheese .....:p

The more bacteria .. the better...!

:lol:

Neverfly
2007-Aug-21, 12:35 AM
I like cheese.. actually I loove cheeses... blue cheese, white cheese, yellow cheese...spotted cheese, round cheese ,triangle cheese, square cheese, oblong cheese .....:p

The more bacteria .. the better...!

:lol:

Be careful that they arent Conan the Bacterium (http://www.astrobio.net/news/article353.html)

jrkeller
2007-Aug-21, 01:24 AM
I like cheese. My daughter loves cheese - a lot!!!.

My mother who grew up during the Great Depression and WWII hates cheese, because for about ten years all she had for lunch was cheese sandwiches.

mike alexander
2007-Aug-21, 02:43 AM
I find that understandable but funny, because when the govt began handing out surplus cheese back when to *ahem* seniors and the like, my mother was first in line. She also grew up through the Depression, and as a result never turned down free food. Taste seemed to be irrelevant to her as long as it wasn't actually mouldy.

(If it was mouldy she would just trim off the mold and eat the rest)

Jens
2007-Aug-21, 07:02 AM
Blue cheese............................................ ......................................
I love it, always did, it's blue and were it not for its long tradition would probably be classed as a prohibited substance but you can't argue with love.

I bought some of that stuff once, but it was mouldy so I threw it away. :)

Urbane Guerrilla
2007-Aug-21, 07:19 AM
Do you get any cheese in the US that isn't squeezable, and from a platic bottle/tube? I like European cheeses. English cheeses like good quality cheddar and stilton in particular.

(This is a genuine question - that's the only US "cheese" I've ever seen)

The cheese properly known as American cheese is a modification of cheddar. That most English of cheeses is all over America, everywhere. To make American, they add some lipid or other to cheddar, which has good and bad effects: the cheese melts more readily and smoothly, this being particularly suited to adorning a hamburger and making it into a cheeseburger, as well as making macaroni with cheese, but the downside is it's also blander to taste. This may be remedied by the addition of more grown-up sorts of cheese to perk the whole mixture up. This is also the cheese used for nachos.

Myself, cain't hardly get enough Stilton, and I snap up all the Brie and Camembert I can get or that others are too timid to try, the poor things not realizing that Penicillium candida is a benevolent microorganism -- but no, not an antibiotic producer. I like the ammoniac cheeses too, such as Saint-Nectaire, which no one else in the house will touch.

It's all about the precisely controlled spoilage of whole milk -- spoiling it with the right microbe and the right strain of microbe. And occasionally about milking water buffalo.

pilgrim
2007-Aug-21, 09:16 AM
How about smiling cow cheese (or what's-its-name)? Cheese that can be spread on a slice of bread instead of butter isn't an all-bad idea. Doesn't beat a good emental or mozzarella, but still...

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Aug-21, 12:47 PM
How about smiling cow cheese (or what's-its-name)? Cheese that can be spread on a slice of bread instead of butter isn't an all-bad idea. Doesn't beat a good emental or mozzarella, but still...
Laughing Cow. ("La vache qui rit")

Emmenthal is the town in Switzerland from which the best-known variety of "Swiss cheese" originates.

pilgrim
2007-Aug-21, 01:09 PM
Laughing Cow. ("La vache qui rit")

Emmenthal is the town in Switzerland from which the best-known variety of "Swiss cheese" originates.

Well, I usually buy the Tipperary Emmenthal. It's cheaper and probably tastes pretty much as good. But it sure isn't from Switzerland, but from Supervalu:lol:! It's great for breakfast, too, on the days I eat breakfast at home

Maksutov
2007-Aug-21, 01:27 PM
I like cheese. Anyone know what makes it taste so good?Simple.

It's bad for you.

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif

captain swoop
2007-Aug-21, 01:48 PM
I used to live close to a wonderful Cheese Shop in London, it had masses of Umpasturised British Cheeses as well as french, Italin etc, the place stank to high heaven but wow, some of it was so Blue you could have painted with it lol.

Ivan Viehoff
2007-Aug-21, 01:59 PM
Swiss
[snip]
Romana (also called Parmesan) would top out my list of favorites
One difference between Europe and the USA is that in Europe, Swiss cheese actually comes from Switzerland. Another difference is that there isn't anything called "Swiss Cheese" that you can buy Europe, rather it would be Appenzeller, Gruyere, Vacherin de Fribourg, etc, ie, specific varieties of Swiss cheese. If you were buying something called "Swiss" and thought it came from Switzerland, or indeed bore any relation to the cheese they eat in Switzerland, I am afraid you were sadly misinformed. Indeed, the cheese sold as "Swiss" in the USA is more like certain cheap industrial Dutch cheeses than anything made in Switzerland. (Though there is also good Dutch cheese.)

I have no idea what "Romana" is, because there is no cheese from Italy of that name. I am prepared to believe that it is also called Parmesan in the USA, thus suggesting that what is sold as Parmesan in the USA doesn't come from Italy either. In Europe, only Parmesan (ie a cheese made in a specific region of Italy to specific rules) is allowed to be called Parmesan.

Real Swiss cheese is all unpasteurised, so I expect it is illegal to sell it in the USA. Parmesan is also unpasteurised, so I expect it is illegal to sell that too. Given that they are heat treated in a later stage of production, possibly they are allowed in the USA, though you wouldn't be allowed to make cheese in that way in the USA, which is why you don't have any cheese remotely approaching the quality of European cheese in the USA.

What I believe certainly isn't allowed in the USA are unpasteurised soft cheeses, such as Brie and Camembert, which have no heat at any stage in production. Personally I prefer not to eat Brie and Camembert or their foreign equivalents unless they are unpasteurised. The unpasteurised form is truly delicious, whereas the pasteurised form is bland when young, ripening to an aroma of babies' nappies being soaked in disinfectant.

Liberty? How can you say you have liberty in a country where a man is not free to eat unpasteurised cheese? I'll stay here where we still have that liberty at least.

Edit: I've just discovered that "Romano" is what Americans call "Pecorino". Which certainly isn't Parmesan.

mike alexander
2007-Aug-21, 02:27 PM
Ivan, all I can say in America's defense on this topic is that safety comes first, and that we just want to live forever as we rule the world.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-21, 02:32 PM
[edit]Liberty? How can you say you have liberty in a country where a man is not free to eat unpasteurised cheese? I'll stay here where we still have that liberty at least....It's still legal in the US to own a cow (as long as one has the minimum required number of acres and the correct location).

Take it from there.

Argos
2007-Aug-21, 02:38 PM
I love Parmesan, Provolone, Gorgonzola, but all of them are dangerous if you have high blood pressure. As I told in Mak´s thread, cheeses down here are suffering from a terrible lack of uniformity lately.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-21, 02:51 PM
It's still legal in the US to own a cow (as long as one has the minimum required number of acres and the correct location).
And has the proper permits, and doesn't sell it, and... Oh; forget it... here's the article which resulted from an undercover milk sting.
Amish Farmer Says Milk Law Contrary to Religious Beliefs (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,201369,00.html)

Anyway; I love cheese... Unfortunately; I need to curtail my phosphor intake, so it's out of the question. :mad:

Favorite? A good wheel of Jarlsburg (sp?) Swiss.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Aug-21, 04:56 PM
YAY for cheese!!! 34 votes and going strong.

captain swoop
2007-Aug-21, 10:45 PM
Neils yard. that's the place I was trying to rememeber

Lord Jubjub
2007-Aug-21, 10:50 PM
One cheese that is very American is Monterey Jack. It was developed in Monterey, California, in the 1800s by Benedictine monks who made a Spanish version of soft cheese. From there it became a popular cheese for many farmers to make. A business man named David Jacks began selling it commercially and his moniker became the name. There is a variant called Pepper Jack which adds in hot peppers.

From the Monterey Count Historical Society (http://www.mchsmuseum.com/cheese.html):


What is Monterey Jack Cheese? First, it is one of the four cheeses to supposedly have been created in the United States. It is said to be a "descendent of the semi-soft Italian cheese that fed Caesar's armies." A booklet from the Kraft Food Co. dated 1954 calls Monterey jack cheese "a mild buffet and sandwich cheese made something like cheddar." The connection to cheddar is due to the manufacturing process that is similar, although without dye. Monterey Jack is also compared as a "granular cheese similar to Wisconsin brick." Lastly and most importantly is that Monterey jack is a descendant of "Queso del Pais" which translates as "country cheese."

Trebuchet
2007-Aug-21, 11:52 PM
Sorry, I've always found Monterey Jack to be the epitome of bland.

Gillianren
2007-Aug-22, 04:16 AM
Sorry, I've always found Monterey Jack to be the epitome of bland.

When combined with colby, it makes for a great melting cheese.

Celestial Mechanic
2007-Aug-22, 04:29 AM
YAY for cheese!!! 34 votes and going strong.
Yes, this has probably been the cheesiest poll ever conducted at BAUT Forum! :D :clap:

Ivan Viehoff
2007-Aug-22, 09:46 AM
Ivan, all I can say in America's defense on this topic is that safety comes first...
The perception that unpasteurised cheese is unsafe is a false rumour put about by industrial dairy concerns, who don't want people to know what good cheese tastes like because they wouldn't be able to produce it. Banning unpasteurised cheese is not a public safety measure, it is a regulation to reduce competition, which the USA is supposed to be in favour of but all too frequently doesn't like.

Large amounts of cheese are eaten in Switzerland, most of it unpasteurised. Have you heard of high mortality rates in that country in consequence? Of course not. There is nothing unsafe about it. It wouldn't be tolerated in such a wealthy and orderly country if it was. In soft cheese, the main issue is listeriosis, and in fact pasteurised cheeses are more prone to it than unpasteurised. There is some brucellosis risk from unpasteurised cheeses, but that can be managed, isn't really very dangerous, and I have not heard of a single incident. We put warning stickers on unpasteurised soft cheese in Europe.

You will find in general that mortality rates in the USA for all sorts of things much more important than cheese (eg infant mortality) are rather higher than Europe, which you could do something about, absent political constraints. So there is little evidence that in truth the USA puts public safety first.

Someone mentioned Jarlsberg and described it as "Swiss". I understand why an American might think it is "Swiss", because it is similar to what is sold as "Swiss" in the USA. But it is actually Norwegian, and its name is in the Norwegian tongue, not German. It is an industrial cheese made using the Dutch Gouda process, not like Swiss cheese at all. Jarlsberg is a perfect analogy of what I referred to as certain industrial cheeses made in the Netherlands. Jarlsberg bears little resemblance to cheese as commonly produced in Switzerland. Sadly Norway has also fallen prey to industrial dairy concerns and their only cheese of any gastronomic interest is their unique caramelised Gjetost, industrial scale production of goat products not really being possible.

There are a number of cheese names which are "generic" rather than "protected designations". Like Cheddar, Emmenthal is one of those generic names, which is why you can buy Irish, French and German "Emmenthal". Compare one of those generic Emmenthals, which will be made by an industrial process from pasteurised milk, with a real Swiss Emmenthal, made of unpasterised milk from cows grazed on flower-covered pastures, and cave-aged, and you will see what I am talking about. The former is rubbery and bland, the later has a stiffer texture and much greater depth and complexity of flavour. Of course unfamiliarity breeds resistance, so if you are unfamiliar with real, naturally produced, food, with complexity of flavour, as most Americans are, there is the risk that you will initially prefer the industrial product.

mfumbesi
2007-Aug-22, 01:17 PM
Love the stuff. I honestly can't get enough of it. Expensive?Yes Yes.

Essan
2007-Aug-22, 01:51 PM
What would we do if them aliens suddenly packed up all their mines on the Moon and we lost our imports of Cheddar and Gorgonzola? :D

Neverfly
2007-Aug-22, 01:53 PM
The HB's will actually find themselves an opportunity for productive, gainful employment.

captain swoop
2007-Aug-22, 02:39 PM
Cheddar is so bland, even the so called 'Mature' stuff.

Maksutov
2007-Aug-22, 03:24 PM
Cheddar is so bland, even the so called 'Mature' stuff.Wow. The "Mature" English variety must be what we call "mild" over here.

I wonder if Granville "Dreadfully Extra Sharp" (http://granville.stores.yahoo.net/2blocofgranc.html) may be exported to England?

Ivan Viehoff
2007-Aug-22, 04:31 PM
Cheddar is so bland, even the so called 'Mature' stuff.
There is a lot of poor quality cheddar sold in Britain, including cheddars from Ireland, Canada and New Zealand (not all of which are bad). A better quality is "Farmhouse" (a legally defined term). The best stuff is unpasteurised. It doesn't have to be extra-mature - cheddars aged too long become waxy, which doesn't necessarily contribute to quality. Personally, I prefer cheddar made from winter milk which has a lower fat content.

My very favourite unpasteurised cheddar is Sgriob-ruadh (often described as Isle of Mull, since they are the only cheese producer on that island, but don't confuse it with Mull of Kintyre which is not a patch on it). Found in specialist cheese shops, and on the island, only. http://www.isleofmullcheese.co.uk/

Maybe Captain Swoop likes to eat Naga chillies for breakfast. Or simply objects to paying the GBP7 per kilo which is about the minimum price of reasonable cheese in this country.

hewhocaves
2007-Aug-22, 05:28 PM
I... I have been eating bricks of parmesan recently. i just can't get enough of it.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Aug-22, 05:49 PM
OK guys looks like its game over.

CHEESE WINS!!!

http://www.worldofwallpapers.nuche.org/content/funnies/800/swiss-cheese-mouse.jpg

mugaliens
2007-Aug-22, 08:00 PM
It's still legal in the US to own a cow (as long as one has the minimum required number of acres and the correct location).

Take it from there.

Uh... So long as I shovel it's residue and feed it appropriately, why can't I keep one in my .15 acre backyard? I'll walk it around the block several times a week if exercise is the principle concern...