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Fraser
2007-Aug-20, 04:00 PM
Canadian and US astronomers have located what is thought to be the closest neutron star ever seen. The exotic object, nicknamed Calvera after the villain in the movie "The Magnificent Seven", is located in the constellation Ursa Minor, somewhere between 250 and 1,000 light-years away. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/08/20/closest-neutron-star-discovered/)

antoniseb
2007-Aug-20, 07:16 PM
High above the plane of the galaxy? And yet only 250-1000 LY from us?
Hmmm, the plane of the galaxy must be thinner than I thought.

John Mendenhall
2007-Aug-20, 07:39 PM
Who ordered this object?

jonfr
2007-Aug-21, 03:38 AM
This is a strange stellar corpse. I also wonder how far it is away from us. But 250 ly to 1000 ly is a awful large diffrence.

trinitree88
2007-Aug-21, 07:15 AM
This one's ~ 200 light years. pete

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/runaway_star_001110.html

Jerry
2007-Aug-21, 05:45 PM
Alien Beacon?

sarongsong
2007-Aug-22, 12:21 AM
This one's ~ 200 light years. pete
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/runaway_star_001110.htmlWhy is this news now?
November 9, 2000
...The object, first spotted in 1992, was confirmed to be a neutron star in 1996. But only now has its distance from Earth been determined, using data provided by the Hubble Space Telescope...
August 21, 2007
...Only seven other neutron stars have been discovered without companions, the "Magnificent Seven." All of those are in or near the disk of the Milky Way galaxy...The exact distance depends on Calvera's exact nature, which the astronomers have not figured out yet...Star-Bulletin (http://starbulletin.com/2007/08/21/news/story09.html)

trinitree88
2007-Aug-22, 01:08 AM
Why is this news now?

sarongsong. Fraser's blog has it's minimum distance for the "nearest" pulsar 250 light years...and there's another even closer. Pete

sarongsong
2007-Aug-22, 02:10 AM
Thanks, Pete, but I saw no reference to pulsar in Fraser's blog; have they just now discovered Calvera is rotating?

nephilin
2007-Aug-22, 02:39 PM
By what porcess does a lone neutron star generate xrays?

trinitree88
2007-Aug-22, 03:00 PM
Thanks, Pete, but I saw no reference to pulsar in Fraser's blog; have they just now discovered Calvera is rotating?

Sarongsong. :shifty:You're right, unless they see a periodicty in the emission, I should say neutron star. Neutrons are unstable in high fields...`1011 gauss or greater, so polar emission is likely to be the source of x-rays.

jonfr
2007-Aug-23, 07:53 AM
Has someone calculated the gravity effects of this stellar remains.

publiusr
2007-Aug-24, 06:37 PM
In what direction is it heading? Passing 'overhead?"

antoniseb
2007-Aug-25, 12:06 PM
Has someone calculated the gravity effects of this stellar remains.
You could make a guess yourself easily enough. There are about 60,000 AU in a light year, and this object is between 250 and 1000 light years from us, so let's call it 300 million AU from us. The object probably has a mass about the mass of the Sun. Gravity goes down as the square of the distance. So this would have about 10-17 the gravitational influence on us that the Sun has. It would also have about one ten thousandth the influence that Alpha Centauri has.