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View Full Version : Identify your birth star! (This is NOT astrology)



Palomar
2007-Aug-23, 06:11 PM
http://outreach.jach.hawaii.edu/birthstars/year.php

I found this cool site via linkydinky.com :)

My birth star [May 18 1965] is Capella, the alpha star of Auriga.

Do it and post your results. :)

WaxRubiks
2007-Aug-23, 06:24 PM
Your Birthday Star:

Your birthday star is in the constellation Bootes. It has the name η (Eta) Bootis in Johann Bayer's Uranometria star catalog. It is also called 8 Bootis in the Historia Cúlestis Britannica of John Flamsteed and Edmund Halley. It is called NS 1354+1823 A in the NStars database.

It has visual magnitude 2.68 meaning that you could see this star with the naked eye in good viewing conditions. It is marked in the center of this star chart, at celestial coordinates (J2000 equinox):
Right ascension 13:54:41.1
Declination 18:23:51.8

This star is 37.0 light years away, which means that the light we see from it today set off on its journey at about the same time that you were born. Come back in a month or two and your birthday star may change, as the light from more distant stars reaches Earth.


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I'm still 36 but my birthday is sep 2nd.

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-23, 06:44 PM
Well mine is.... hang on, this is a sneaky way to find out everyone's age isn't it?:lol:

Chuck
2007-Aug-23, 08:01 PM
Your birthday star is in the constellation Hydra. It has the name τ01 (Tau01) Hydrae in Johann Bayer's Uranometria star catalog. It is also called 31 Hydrae in the Historia Cúlestis Britannica of John Flamsteed and Edmund Halley. It is called NS 0929-0246 A in the NStars database.

It has visual magnitude 4.6 meaning that you could just see this star with the naked eye under the best viewing conditions. It is marked in the center of this star chart, at celestial coordinates (J2000 equinox):
Right ascension 9:29:8.9
Declination -2:46:8.2

This star is 55.8 light years away, which means that the light we see from it today set off on its journey at about the same time that you were born. Come back in a month or two and your birthday star may change, as the light from more distant stars reaches Earth.

It's too late for me to find something close. Maybe I'll schedule a party for when Alpha Centauri becomes my death star, four years or so after I'm gone. I guess I'll have to pay for it in advance.

Swift
2007-Aug-23, 08:17 PM
Your birthday star has the common name Alderamin. It is in the constellation Cepheus. It has the name α (Alpha) Cephei in Johann Bayer's Uranometria star catalog. It is also called 5 Cephei in the Historia Cúlestis Britannica of John Flamsteed and Edmund Halley. It is called NS 2118+6235 in the NStars database.

It has visual magnitude 2.45 meaning that you could see this star easily with the naked eye. It is marked in the center of this star chart, at celestial coordinates (J2000 equinox):

Right ascension 21:18:34.8
Declination 62:35:8

Of course, I didn't know what the heck a "birth star" was, but this part of the website (http://outreach.jach.hawaii.edu/birthstars/index.html) has this explanation:

Tell the Birthday Stars computer when you were born, and it will look for a star that is your age in light years away from Earth. This means that the light we're seeing from that star today actually left the star around when you were born, and has taken your entire life to reach Earth.