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Tuckerfan
2003-Jul-12, 08:25 PM
I just happened to spot this in rewatching a clip where Jim Lovell is imagining what it would be like to walk on the Moon. As Hanks steps off the ladder and onto the footpad, I noticed that it's not wrapped in gold foil like the others are. In all the photos I've seen of the real LMs, the footpads are all identically wrapped. Of course, I can imagine why they did it that way. I doubt if the foil would be able to withstand much abuse and if they had to do multiple takes, they'd either have to replace the foil or do the shoot with torn foil on the footpads.

glen chapman
2003-Jul-13, 03:00 AM
sssssssssssssshhhh - not so loud. I bet within two weeks - this information you have uncovered will be used as a proof about man not landing on the Moon

But it is only a movie...I hear you mutter

So was Capricorn One. :o

Glen

darkhunter
2003-Jul-13, 08:28 AM
I just happened to spot this in rewatching a clip where Jim Lovell is imagining what it would be like to walk on the Moon. As Hanks steps off the ladder and onto the footpad, I noticed that it's not wrapped in gold foil like the others are. In all the photos I've seen of the real LMs, the footpads are all identically wrapped. Of course, I can imagine why they did it that way. I doubt if the foil would be able to withstand much abuse and if they had to do multiple takes, they'd either have to replace the foil or do the shoot with torn foil on the footpads.

Key word--"imagining". Maybe he was so focused on the simple fact he was on the moon that minor (to his dream) details about gold foil are totaly ignored... 8)

AstroSmurf
2003-Jul-14, 06:33 AM
Or perhaps gold foil wasn't budgeted... Oh, wait, this is Hollywood we're talking about. Nevermind.

There are bigger problems in Apollo 13 (The course correction burn springs to mind), but it's still the best dramatization that I've seen of the space program.

What others is there? I've seen The Right Stuff :-? and Space Cowboys 8) ... are there others?

kucharek
2003-Jul-14, 10:13 AM
are there others?

Marooned (http://us.imdb.com/Details?0064639) :-?
Countdown (http://us.imdb.com/Details?0062827) :-?

Oh yeah, and don't forget Stowaway to the Moon (http://us.imdb.com/Details?0073752) :roll:

AstroSmurf
2003-Jul-14, 10:29 AM
Perhaps we should limit it to the dramatizations of missions that actually took place, so Space Cowboys doesn't really qualify. Otherwise, we might as well add in Arm[bad movie deleted]... :P

jamestox
2003-Jul-14, 01:22 PM
There's also George Pal's Destination: Moon (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0042393), based on one of Heinlein's books; it has some pretty good science in it, considering the period it was released!

JT :wink:

(edited by JT to insert the film's url...)

Russ
2003-Jul-14, 09:33 PM
Or perhaps gold foil wasn't budgeted... Oh, wait, this is Hollywood we're talking about. Nevermind.

There are bigger problems in Apollo 13 (The course correction burn springs to mind), but it's still the best dramatization that I've seen of the space program.

What others is there? I've seen The Right Stuff :-? and Space Cowboys 8) ... are there others?
I consider "The Right Stuff" a drug induced halucination rather than any resemblance to reality. Their treatment of Guss Grissom was abyssmal to say the least. :evil:

tracer
2003-Jul-15, 03:52 PM
Not to mention the fact that they completely left out Gordo Cooper's Mercury flight, which was probably the most dramatic of the 6 Mercury missions that actually flew, and would have completely justified the scene where they strongarmed Werner von Braun into providing manual controls to the astronaut-pilot!

ToSeek
2003-Jul-15, 05:04 PM
Not to mention the fact that they completely left out Gordo Cooper's Mercury flight, which was probably the most dramatic of the 6 Mercury missions that actually flew, and would have completely justified the scene where they strongarmed Werner von Braun into providing manual controls to the astronaut-pilot!

No they didn't. The movie makes the most of Cooper falling asleep on the launch pad, but the flight is definitely in there. There's even an audio clip (http://www.destgulch.com/movies/rstuff/rstuff53.wav) online to prove it.

RBG
2003-Jul-15, 10:06 PM
It's been a while, but as I recall it, the movie ends with Coopers launch... doesn't it?

RBG

Okay... I'll tell you my favourite personal Gordo story... Well, my only Cooper story come to think of it. As a very young lad who distinctly remembers watching John Glenn's original launch - & thus forevermore a black-belt space flight junkie - imagine my giddy excitement after driving 250 miles to listen to Cooper speak, about two or so years ago. And the subsequent kid-crushing disbelief when he wouldn't sign his book specifically to me: "I can't personalize it." ... ... Hey... Gordo Cooper talked to me!!

-R

tracer
2003-Jul-15, 11:05 PM
It's been a while, but as I recall it, the movie ends with Coopers launch... doesn't it?
Yep. And that was my beef -- Cooper's flight ended with a hugely dramatic failure of just about every on-board system except for the manual flight controls. Gordo had to aim and time the deorbit burn with nothing more than a wristwatch and eyeballs-on-the-horizon. (Try accomplishing that feat with the circus performers or chimpanzees NASA originally wanted to send into space!)

RBG
2003-Jul-15, 11:17 PM
And yet, if memory serves, he brought his capsule down within record closeness to the carrier. ..."You're looking at him."

RBG

tracer
2003-Jul-17, 01:28 AM
Darn tootin'!

Musashi
2003-Jul-17, 01:45 AM
RBG, don't know if this is any consolation, but signed books are worth more than inscribed books. :)

BigJim
2003-Jul-20, 02:19 AM
I think you're lucky if you can meet any astronaut, especially a member of the Mercury Seven.

I've only met one astronaut, but he is one of the more exceptional ones - Story Musgrave. He gave a fascinating talk and gave me two personalized autographs. In case you haven't heard of him before, he has a host of achievements, including the first spacewalk from a shuttle and working on the first HST servicing mission, and has six shuttle flights under his belt. Very cool guy.




Marooned

Hey! I liked Marooned! What did you think was wrong with it?



There are bigger problems in Apollo 13 (The course correction burn springs to mind), but it's still the best dramatization that I've seen of the space program.

That was my biggest gripe with the movie. It was about three times longer than the real one and made it seem much more uncontrolled and panicked than it actually was. Actually, after reading the book I saw a lot of things in the movie that I didn't like. It ignored a lot of issues, including the PC + 2 burn and all burns other than the course correction if I remember correctly, as well as Battery 2 in the LM exploding, and it oversimplified a great deal of issues. There were actually quite a few problems with Apollo 13, but compared to most other space movies it's about as realistic as Hollywood gets.

ToSeek
2003-Jul-20, 05:03 AM
That was my biggest gripe with the movie. It was about three times longer than the real one and made it seem much more uncontrolled and panicked than it actually was. Actually, after reading the book I saw a lot of things in the movie that I didn't like. It ignored a lot of issues, including the PC + 2 burn and all burns other than the course correction if I remember correctly, as well as Battery 2 in the LM exploding, and it oversimplified a great deal of issues. There were actually quite a few problems with Apollo 13, but compared to most other space movies it's about as realistic as Hollywood gets.

One of the things I like about Apollo 13 is that there are lots of little dialog bits and asides that you can pick up on if you're familiar with the space program. For example, the PC+2 burn is mentioned (several times), just never with much emphasis.

Avatar28
2003-Jul-22, 07:39 PM
I think you're lucky if you can meet any astronaut, especially a member of the Mercury Seven.



Hmm, I've met two of them. Story Musgrave and Rhea Seddon, both in intimate settings. Actually, I got to present Rhea Seddon with a bouquet of flowers. :-)

tracer
2003-Jul-22, 07:45 PM
Hmm, I've met two of them. Story Musgrave and Rhea Seddon, both in intimate settings. Actually, I got to present Rhea Seddon with a bouquet of flowers. :-)
Um ... er ... this, um, intimate setting didn't perchance happen to bear some relation to this thread (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=6869), did it? :oops:

RBG
2003-Jul-23, 12:22 AM
Story Musgrave was also in the news recently as a critic of some of the decision-making during the last shuttle flight.

RBG

Avatar28
2003-Jul-24, 02:46 PM
Hmm, I've met two of them. Story Musgrave and Rhea Seddon, both in intimate settings. Actually, I got to present Rhea Seddon with a bouquet of flowers. :-)
Um ... er ... this, um, intimate setting didn't perchance happen to bear some relation to this thread (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=6869), did it? :oops:

LOL. No, not hardly. When I was in high school, our middle school was selected to be part of the STS-58 SAREX mission. I had always been one of if not THE favorite student of the teacher who was doing it. (I think doing an oral report on quarks and other sub subatomic particles in the 6th grade contributed to that). Anyways, I was asked to join the project and help with the computers. We were using computers to track the shuttle and practice our contact, etc. I had to get the synchornized as exactly as possible, help the kids learn how to use them, set them up to practice the contacts, etc.

ToSeek
2003-Jul-24, 03:44 PM
I think you're lucky if you can meet any astronaut, especially a member of the Mercury Seven.



Hmm, I've met two of them. Story Musgrave and Rhea Seddon, both in intimate settings. Actually, I got to present Rhea Seddon with a bouquet of flowers. :-)

I've met a few of them, including Sally Ride, who's one of the most impressive people I've met in my life, but never particularly up close and personal, though one of them does work for my company. ;)

RBG
2003-Aug-11, 08:31 PM
Well, yesterday I had my second glorious "encounter" with an astronaut: Major General Bill Anders who was part of the first crew of earthlings to go to the moon on Apollo 8. I found him rather distant.

That is, I could see his head from a distance. Does that count for anything?

Yesterday was the final day of the Abbotsford International Airshow near Vancouver, Canada and the General flew his P-51 Mustang "Val-halla" in tandem with an F-14(?) It was great.

I'm on the ground thinking, "Isn't it something that I should know a bit about his future that he doesn't even know... That I am going to be waiting by the tarmac to meet him and maybe get an autograph."

That was just about the time the airshow announcer mentioned Anders would now be flying home & I watched him disappear into the horizon.

RBG

Which brings up an interesting trivia question as to who was the first person(s) to go to the moon. If Columbus had sailed along the North American shore without touching ground, would he still be hailed as anything?

BigJim
2003-Aug-11, 08:53 PM
Story Musgrave was also in the news recently as a critic of some of the decision-making during the last shuttle flight.

Story made an interesting point after the Columbia disaster. After he mentiioned the relative weakness of the space shuttle and tile system, he was asked, "But isn't the Shuttle resilient? Doesn't it have to be to withstand these schorching reentries?" He said something to the effect of, "The Shuttle is like the human body. It can seem strong, but in the right kind of accident, it can totally break down."

I just thought that was an interesting analogy. Mae Jemison was also being interviewed with him.

Now that I think of it I also got to see Jon McBride speak once, but he wasn't as interesting as Story and I didn't get his autograph.

Doodler
2003-Aug-11, 09:51 PM
So where does Ron Howard's series From the Earth to the Moon fall in the pantheon of astonomy flicks?

And if you want a moonwalking stinker, you can always pull out Moontrap.

And even worse, there was an obscure little made for TV thing called Plymouth, just about the time Earth 2 kicked off.

BigJim
2003-Aug-11, 09:54 PM
I thought From the Earth to the Moon was excellent, although I thought they misaligned the time; in other words, too much time given to Alan Shepard's flight, and no time to other Mercury flights. The Gemini coverage was simply OK. I think they could have added a few more episodes to better cover Mercury and Gemini. They got most of the major incidents in there. Of course, there was BA, but most of it isn't worth the effort to complain about. But the "astronauts" are actors on Earth, and you can only expect so much realism.

Never saw Moontrap. But Marooned was good.

The worst lunar EVA I ever saw was in an Outer Limits episode called "Moonstone". Ridiculous, although it was made a few years before the Apollo missions.

BigJim
2003-Aug-11, 09:58 PM
Here's a picture from that awful sequence:

http://www.innermind.com/outerlimits/pictures/o_pitsvc/po_ol18.htm

ToSeek
2003-Aug-11, 11:31 PM
So where does Ron Howard's series From the Earth to the Moon fall in the pantheon of astonomy flicks?



It should hold a place of honor, IMHO.

tracer
2003-Aug-11, 11:34 PM
Yesterday was the final day of the Abbotsford International Airshow near Vancouver, Canada and the General flew his P-51 Mustang "Val-halla" in tandem with an F-14(?) It was great.
The F-14 must've been flying with full flaps near its stall speed in order for the P-51 to be able to keep up with it. ;)

RBG
2003-Aug-12, 12:31 AM
Yeah, I guess so. Except a quick double-check showed that it was an F15 Eagle, not an F-14. (At the same show an F-18 (Hornet) flew alongside a Harvard.)

RBG