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EvilEye
2007-Sep-09, 06:30 PM
A trip to Mars could take from 6 months to 3 years.

How can they avoid being bored and feeling lonely, and most of all... getting on each other's nerves being couped-up in such a small area for so long?

I don't think it will ever work.

Imagine even just trying to have a conversation with your wife or kids. You would have to wait 15 minutes before they could answer you, and you would have to wait another 15 minutes to get the reply back again.

Cookie
2007-Sep-09, 06:40 PM
Perhaps they could bring along some modified Video Game Consoles like the Playstation 2, 3, or XBOX 360?
They can come pre-loaded with all of the Video Games available at launch, and have the capability to recieve new game "Uploads" in-flight.
They could fill the voids in the trips where there's nothing more important that needs to be done.

Also, they can send along a bunch of Movies, and upload new movies and whatever TV Shows the crew likes to watch.

I dunno... Playing Video Games, watching TV, and seeing Movies already do a darn good job of escaping boredom, relieving stress, and taking one's mind off of stuff going on around us, here, on good old mother Earth.

Of course, there are also a TON of books that could be sent along, and even requested and wirelessly uploaded to their computers and what not.

EvilEye
2007-Sep-09, 07:20 PM
Isn't part of their training like playing a videogame? I would think that their simulations would be more than enough "video-gaming", and they'd be sick of it before they even took off.

astromark
2007-Sep-09, 07:36 PM
They could watch an endless stream of reruns.... we do.
I sagest the trip time is shorter than you predict. If the voyage is timed with orbital passes as it must. Is it only about 100 days each way. With a stay period of 20 months to get this timing right. I am sure others will correct my error here...

ABR.
2007-Sep-09, 07:39 PM
Write books or research papers.
Take up art -- hey, it worked for Dave Bowman!
Telecommute to a job back on Earth.
Earn that law degree/MBA/etc. via looooong distance learning.
For that matter, teach, podcast, etc.

Warren Platts
2007-Sep-09, 07:50 PM
A trip to Mars could take from 6 months to 3 years.

How can they avoid being bored and feeling lonely, and most of all... getting on each other's nerves being couped-up in such a small area for so long?

I don't think it will ever work.No whiners onboard for starters! :dance::whistle::dance::whistle::dance::whistle: :naughty:

It's sort of like being on a long navy cruise with no liberty ports, or in jail. People do it all the time.

You work out, you eat, you watch TV, you read a book a day, you play chess or Monopoly or Risk, you talk and you talk and you talk and you talk, and then eat some more. And then there's always your harmonica to practice on.


Imagine even just trying to have a conversation with your wife or kids. You would have to wait 15 minutes before they could answer you, and you would have to wait another 15 minutes to get the reply back again.Even worse: you wouldn't be able to surf the internet!

Tim Thompson
2007-Sep-09, 07:56 PM
A trip to Mars could take from 6 months to 3 years.
The one way voyage from Earth to Mars takes 6-9 months, depending on a combination of where the planets are, and how much money we are willing to spend on thrust. So the round trip mission could not last less than a year, if we are really lucky, and the planets line up nicely. More likely, a round trip mission will take about 3 years.


How can they avoid being bored and feeling lonely, and most of all ... getting on each other's nerves being couped-up in such a small area for so long?
A reasonable question, and something the US Navy has had to deal with for a long time. What happens to crews who are underwater on strategic missle submarines for 6 months at a stretch? And how about an aircraft carrier, with 1000 to 3000 people on board, running around in circles, without seeing land, for 4 months? The submarine example is a closer approximation to a Mars mission, but the latter example shows that even large numbers of people on a large carrier, can get loopy in short period of time. The south pole station is another example of people isolated from the world for 9 months at a time. But even in those harsh conditions, they know we can get them out if the need arises (as was done a few years ago when it was discovered that their base doctor needed treatment for a cancer that was discovered only on station).

But the Navy has an advantage. If anything goes wrong, there is always a strong rescue capability in place. But once a manned mission to Mars takes off, they are on their own. There is little that anybody on Earth can do to help, and absolutely nothing they can do to control the Mars bound folks. It's a real human problem that is often overlooked in the concentration on technical difficulties.

So we need a big, roomy spacecraft, not a tiny space shuttle. There has to be room for enough people so they don't feel too lonely or isolated, and those people have to have private quarters. It has to be built like a small to medium size ocean going ship. Nothing that big can be launched from Earth in one shot, so it has to be built in orbit. The currrent cost for a shuttle launch is about $500,000,000. So, unless launch costs come down, it will take 50-100 launches to build the Mars ship, and a cost no less than $25 billion, just to get the pieces off the ground. Add to that the need to take all the food & water for a 3-year journey (plus reserves for emergencies, and keep in mind that water is heavy so will cost considerable extra just to get off the ground).

I don't see any way to get people to Mars, and get them back, in reasonable condition, both mentally & physically, for anything less than a trillion dollars ($1,000,000,000,000). That has to include all the advanced study cost, as well as development, management, and a host of other needs.

Warren Platts
2007-Sep-09, 08:15 PM
I would say a Skylab sized crew compartment should be sufficient for a half-dozen people and could be lifted in a single launch with the right heavy launch vehicle. 1 trillion is 10% of the US economy! I'd say it could be done probably with a fraction of the Iraq effort.

WaxRubiks
2007-Sep-09, 08:33 PM
what about sending two sets of crew that had two seperate living quarters?
they could communicate with each other by email and then periodically they could switch people about. hey maybe it would be more interesting with three units.
people would get less bored with each other.

Robert TG
2007-Sep-09, 09:50 PM
Boredom? Just have a look out the window with a telescope as you float around the cabin.

The flight planners would have plenty for the crew to do each day.
What happens aboard the space station for months at a time?

Boredom? It would be an exciting prospect, leaving Earth for Mars and about to walk on another planet. Perhaps the question should be how to get some sleep with all that excitement.

ngc3314
2007-Sep-09, 09:56 PM
Not surprisingly, Poul Anderson was among those who thought and wrote about this. In his 1989 novel The Saturn Game, he pictures a crew headed for the icy moon which passes the cruise time with intricate role-playing fantasies. Once they reach the icy moons, this pastime turns around to bite them...

EvilEye
2007-Sep-09, 10:29 PM
I actually like being by myself. But I also like knowing that if I feel like it, I can run to the store for a beer. If it took me an hour between asking my wife how our kids were and finding out, that would drive me nuts by itself.

And as bad as the shuttle smells... and UGH... the ISS... how bad would thier ship smell just by the time they got TO Mars?

Tim Thompson
2007-Sep-10, 12:09 AM
I would say a Skylab sized crew compartment should be sufficient ...
I don't think that could ever work. Skylab, or something that size, works because it is in Earth orbit. It can be routinely resupplied, and it can be evacuated in an emergency. In the case of a trip to Mars, neither of these will be the case. There will be no "escape" mechanism, since there will be nowhere to go. And the closest thing to re-supply is pre-positioning of material at Mars. But in any case, a ship that small simply cannot hold the astronauts, and all the food & water & rovers & science instruments & etc. that they will need on Mars.

Valeriy Polyakov (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valeri_Polyakov) seems to be the record holder, remaining aborard MIR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mir) for 14 months. That's impressive, but I don't think it's going to work for a 36-month mission to Mars. On MIR, and any oterh space station, there is a constant turn-around of people, even if one guy hangs on for the record. But going to Mars, they are all stuck with each other.

Three years is a long time for people to be stuck together. I should think you would not want to launch such a mission without at least testing to see if people can survive in Earth orbit that way.

And consider this: Will a conservative Republican administration send unmarried astronaut couples into space? Or will the mission be an all-male (or all female) affair?

Cookie
2007-Sep-10, 12:26 AM
Isn't part of their training like playing a videogame? I would think that their simulations would be more than enough "video-gaming", and they'd be sick of it before they even took off.

Hmm... I dunno. Just like with other forms of entertainment media, there is a wide variety of genres to choose from, and even games in the same genre can radically differ from each other.
:think:

Truth be told, I can't really imagine what it'd be like to be forced to spend three years stuck with the same people...
Hmm...
Yeah, it's starting to sound like it could become nightmare...

I guess they'll need to test a crew out for a year or so on the Moon?
They could even go so far as to simulate the increasing communications time diffrence during the human experiment?
Hmm... It may be a good test bed for trying out all sorts of activities; seeing how the human mind deals with them, and what does and doesn't work, but then again, I guess it'd be kind of subjective and depend on the person.

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-10, 01:08 AM
They would have some free time but perhaps 12 hours or more of their day would be spent in scheduled work, study and exercise. If it going to cost a trillion dollars to send them, then the organization in charge is going to make sure they at least appear to be getting their money's worth. They will not want news of slacker cosmonauts who spend a lot of their time sitting around playing computer games getting back to earth. Time will be spent going over what will be done on mars including how to deploy and use equipment, going over hundreds of emergancy scenarios, revising scientific procedures, checking the status of their spaceship, and practicing the first line they will say on mars so they won't forget an "a". Basically the crew will be trained to behave like efficient robots so the mission will get the most benefit for the busks.

On the way back you might expect them to have a little more free time, but their space agency will probably keep them busy with make work experiments and obervations to try to stop them wigging out.

Tim Thompson
2007-Sep-10, 01:27 AM
Basically the crew will be trained to behave like efficient robots so the mission will get the most benefit for the busks.
They will have to be well trained, of course. But once they take off, how does one "force" them to do anything? They can pretty much do as they please, and until they get back to Earth, who can do anything about it? The ship is almost like an independent country on its way to Mars.

Delvo
2007-Sep-10, 01:54 AM
I know that an international treaty which was meant for weapons and based on paranoia of anything involving the word "nuclear" kept us from developing nuclear engines which some say could have been better than the chemical engines we've been using. How much better? How much time would they save?

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-10, 01:58 AM
They will have to be well trained, of course. But once they take off, how does one "force" them to do anything? They can pretty much do as they please, and until they get back to Earth, who can do anything about it? The ship is almost like an independent country on its way to Mars.

That's all very true, but you'll notice that very few millitary or cargo vessels or planes go off course and head to the Bahamas for party time, despite their crews often being made to work 12 hours or even more a day, so I think it is likely that the crew will follow their training regimen. If I was a space agency I would only send crew members who promised to follow their training on the trip out and back. It's possible that a crew member could be a lier, but its unlikely that a person who lacked dedication would make it through training on earth. A crew member suffering from depression that interfers with their training during the trip is a more likely problem.

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-10, 02:05 AM
I know that an international treaty which was meant for weapons and based on paranoia of anything involving the word "nuclear" kept us from developing nuclear engines which some say could have been better than the chemical engines we've been using. How much better? How much time would they save?

Actually such engines were developed and tested and as far as I'm aware there is nothing preventing them from being used in space. There are important safety considerations involved in getting them into space however. And as they would be very expensive to make for a mars mission they may not save money over chemical rockets or nuclear or solar powered ion drive. Also, increased performance would probably be traded for reduced launch mass to offset the cost of developing and launching the nuclear drive so the trip time might well be the same. Of course it all depends on how advanced and effective the nuclear propulsion systems are.

EvilEye
2007-Sep-10, 02:10 AM
Anywhere..even the moon... is fairly close... so delay in communication is not that bad.

But I just can't imagine having a faulty somethingorother and having to wait 30 minutes for someone to tell me how to fix it.

novaderrik
2007-Sep-10, 07:00 AM
But I just can't imagine having a faulty somethingorother and having to wait 30 minutes for someone to tell me how to fix it.

that's why they send up a roll of duct tape on every shuttle mission, and why they'd probably have a few crates of the stuff on a Mars mission.
didn't the Apollo astronauts use it on the moon to build fenders for their rovers?
maybe they better send up a hammer and a battery powered sawzall, as well. between the tape, the hammer, and the sawzall, there isn't any problem that can't be solved.

mfumbesi
2007-Sep-10, 07:04 AM
This is a fun thread.
3 years with the same 12 people, if its mixed sexes, I hope they get enough contraceptives/c. You don't want to send 12 people and have 15 return. In 3 years that funny looking geek guy starts looking rather niceish if you squint your eyes.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Sep-10, 07:31 AM
How can they avoid being bored and feeling lonely, and most of all... getting on each other's nerves being couped-up in such a small area for so long?

Would it be that hard? How many people do you see everyday? How many do you want to see everyday? If they ever make such a voyage it would be half a dozen I guess so maybe it isn't too hard.

Think of seamen making long voyages in the seas often going for a few years.
They had lots of games and gambling of course.

I don't think it will ever work.

Ever?!



Imagine even just trying to have a conversation with your wife or kids. You would have to wait 15 minutes before they could answer you, and you would have to wait another 15 minutes to get the reply back again.

Well telephones/chat was invented recently and before that they used snail mail. It wouldnt be that long

EvilEye
2007-Sep-10, 11:48 AM
I don't even see how you could test the people.

A simulation would be to lock the contenders in isolation for 3 years.

Why would they want to do it all over again after that?

Just knowing that you can't get back quick is scary enough.

I'd love to go to Mars, but that is a reallllllllllllly long time in a very small space.

Even criminals aren't locked up 24/7... they play ball, go out in the yard, go to the cafeteria..etc... And see some different people from time to time.

Robert TG
2007-Sep-10, 01:26 PM
To reduce weight, of people and their supplies, why does NASA not recruit people who are dwarfs? Early astronauts were chosen partly on their physical size.
I suspect the prejudice against this idea is by those who do not consider that the small people would be equal to the job.
A small dwarf may not be the ideal 'poster boy' for NASA but would be a better choice to send than a striking 6 foot plus male.
Therefore a ship the size of Skylab could be large enough for a Mars journey.

I suppose it really comes down to is "why send a crew to Mars?". Is it for the science or for the public relations exercise of the politician who directs the money for the project?

Tim Thompson
2007-Sep-10, 03:05 PM
Think of seamen making long voyages in the seas often going for a few years. They had lots of games and gambling of course.
They also had keel hauling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keelhauling), flogging (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flogging), and other diversions to keep them in line. They were bored a lot, but learned not to complain about it too much.


I suppose it really comes down to is "why send a crew to Mars?". Is it for the science or for the public relations exercise of the politician who directs the money for the project?
In the short term, because people can do things that robots just can't. Robotic exploration of the solar system has paid off very well so far, and will continue to do so for quite a while. But sooner or later, you will need real people. A real geologist can pick up a rock and tell you all about it in a few seconds, a few minutes at most. Having real scientists on site is hard to improve upon no matter how the rover is equipt.

In the long run, there is the notion of colonizing other places. What if Earth get's slapped by a 100 kilometer asteroid? Could happen, even if it is unlikely. It would be nice to have some genes tucked away on Mars for safe keeping. Or maybe people will go there just because they can, not because they are sent. Nobody "sent" Columbus, he was itching to go on his own (expecting, of course, to get rich as a consequence). Somebody will go. Better that we control the going so that Mars does not become the wild wild west of space. Then again, maybe a wild wild west on Mars is not a bad idea?

EvilEye
2007-Sep-10, 03:50 PM
Imagine this...

Something goes awry on the ship, when you are all the way "over there", and need to ask for assistance on the best way to attempt a delicate repair. (Maybe the oxygen recycler has gone catywampus and you only have 20 minutes of clean air left.) And the back-ups are failing too. But you have to wait 30 minutes for the instructions, and then still have to do the repair, which takes time.

It just isn't a risk I would be would be willing to take.

Godspeed to anyone that does.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Sep-10, 03:52 PM
To reduce weight, of people and their supplies, why does NASA not recruit people who are dwarfs? Early astronauts were chosen partly on their physical size.

If they are going to spend billions to design a spacecraft merely for dwarfs then it would, obviously no use to normal people. At some point you would want to have more than just dwarfs walking on Mars so I think its for economic reasons.

korjik
2007-Sep-10, 05:50 PM
Imagine this...

Something goes awry on the ship, when you are all the way "over there", and need to ask for assistance on the best way to attempt a delicate repair. (Maybe the oxygen recycler has gone catywampus and you only have 20 minutes of clean air left.) And the back-ups are failing too. But you have to wait 30 minutes for the instructions, and then still have to do the repair, which takes time.

It just isn't a risk I would be would be willing to take.

Godspeed to anyone that does.

Anyone who would get sent to mars isnt going to wait around passively to get word on how to fix the oxygen recycler. First, at least 2 people will have at least some knowledge on how the thing is put together, and prolly everyone will know how it works. Second, they are going to start fixing it immediately after they realize it is broke, using the on hand know how. Third, the point of backups is that if there is a failure in one, the backup takes over. It is unlikely that there wont be hours between event and death to fix things.

EvilEye
2007-Sep-10, 06:19 PM
"Unlikely" is unacceptable that far away. At least for me.

There's no such thing as an accident. Someone is as fault.

It would have to be 100% impossible for anything life-threatening to occur outside of a natural occurance.

But to get back on track...

I cannot fathom ...even with busy work to do... that after 180 days, ANYONE would not be going stir crazy... especially knowing that even if they wanted to come home, they are stuck for at least another 180 days.

neilzero
2007-Sep-10, 10:05 PM
"No such thing as an accident", may be a good management philosophy, even if it is a wrong assumption. At least occassionally, we find the errors made did not trigger the failure. Sometimes there is no one to blame, except the persons who decided the project was a go, and the go decision was likely reasonable. Neil

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-11, 01:31 AM
There's no such thing as an accident. Someone is as fault.

Really? My sister had her car wiped off by a kangaroo that leapt in front of it. So I want to know, who is mind controlling kangaroos?

EvilEye
2007-Sep-11, 02:04 AM
Did I not say "outside of a natural occurance"?

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-11, 02:36 AM
Did I not say "outside of a natural occurance"?

Sorry. I take it that a kangaroo is a natural occurance. But I guess it's really my sister's fault for not having a roo bar on her car. However a roo bar is an additional cost that she decided to do without and her gamble failed, but considering how rarely people with her driving habits hit roos I don't thing she was wrong to take the risk.

novaderrik
2007-Sep-11, 07:48 AM
i don't think anyone would get too bored for too long on a trip to Mars.
on the way out, they'd be able to look out a window at any time and see that small orange dot get increasingly larger every day as they got closer. then, once they were in orbit, they'd be spending all their time checking all their equipment and procedures, then, once they landed, they'd have a whole world all to themselves just waiting to be explored.
once they were on their way back to earth, they'd be able to look back and see that orange dot get smaller, and look forward and see that blue dot getting bigger.
think about it- if a Mars mission lasted 3 years from launch off earth to landing back on earth and was launched at the same time as the MER rovers back in 2003, the mission would have been over for about a year at this point and the next mission would probably be closing in on landing on the surface of Mars right now.

Van Rijn
2007-Sep-11, 08:15 AM
I cannot fathom ...even with busy work to do... that after 180 days, ANYONE would not be going stir crazy... especially knowing that even if they wanted to come home, they are stuck for at least another 180 days.

Different people can accept different things. I can't imagine voluntarily agreeing to those long duration (several weeks) bed rest experiments used to duplicate some effects of zero gravity. Just the thought of being stuck in bed like that is extremely uncomfortable.

On the other hand, the idea of being in a spacecraft, being able to move around, with certainly a good number of daily tasks, and plenty of options for entertainment in off hours, and, most importantly, GOING TO MARS, would be something I'd jump at in a second. I don't think 180 days each way would bother me.

Stuart van Onselen
2007-Sep-11, 01:24 PM
And consider this: Will a conservative Republican administration send unmarried astronaut couples into space? Or will the mission be an all-male (or all female) affair?

Why do you ask? Do you think they're going to launch this mission before January 2009? What do you know that you're not telling us? ;)

Seriously, folks, you guys are missing something here - The overwhelming majority of astonauts are mid-ranking military people, who have subsequently made it into a national space programand then been through all the training that implies.

That means they are a lot more dedicated, disciplined and stable* than the average Joe. And more intelligent and physically fit, too.

Sure, boredom will be a problem. Sure, there will be risks. But NASA (or whoever) will have their best and brightest psychologists working on the problem. As others have pointed out, people have dealt with boredom, isolation, and risky journeys, for centuries.

Yes, this journey will be more stressful than, say, sailing a windjammer across the Atlantic for the first time. But the people going on this trip will be hand-picked for the task, not just a random bunch of sailors from the late middle-ages.

---

*Of all the hundreds of astronauts past and present, we've had exactly one lose her little mind. That's a lot better than the average population.

EvilEye
2007-Sep-11, 03:27 PM
Your right. Much more stable than the average Joe. Except when they throw on a diaper and drive a couple thousand miles to scare someoneone. ;)

korjik
2007-Sep-11, 04:03 PM
"Unlikely" is unacceptable that far away. At least for me.

There's no such thing as an accident. Someone is as fault.

It would have to be 100% impossible for anything life-threatening to occur outside of a natural occurance.

But to get back on track...

I cannot fathom ...even with busy work to do... that after 180 days, ANYONE would not be going stir crazy... especially knowing that even if they wanted to come home, they are stuck for at least another 180 days.

'Unlikely', especially to a NASA engineer, is a probability more along the lines of winning the lottery while getting hit by lightning and finding out the person you just met is your long lost twin brother.

Trying to plan for those probabilities is usually a losing effort because Murphy has a much, much better imagination.

korjik
2007-Sep-11, 04:05 PM
Why do you ask? Do you think they're going to launch this mission before January 2009? What do you know that you're not telling us? ;)



They launched last week. oops. I can already hear the helocoptors :)

crosscountry
2007-Sep-11, 05:10 PM
ignoring the diaper comment:



I'm certain stricter phsycohological tests will be performed and a person's background will be taken into effect. Only people fit for the trip will be allowed to even apply.

Something that concerns me is that the crew will almost assuredly be mixed gender, race, but more concerning nationality. People will be from different parts of the world. I suspect this will have many positives, but I can see some negatives. First imagine that everyone speaks English. That's the way things are going. But on top of that two people speak Chinese, 4 Spanish, and some of each of them speak French and Russian on top of that. Now, don't you see cliques forming and some back talking?

I recently travelled around Europe with a riding partner for 30 days on a motorcycle. We had contact with other people, but even after those 30 days we were talking about each other when the partner wasn't looking. If languages were involved - and they were at one point, you can talk about someone in front of their face. Even even tempered people might find that hard to bear.

I've got some other ideas for problems, as I'm sure many people do. that is a long trip. Anyway, it'd be fun and worth the effort!

Argos
2007-Sep-11, 07:50 PM
how does one "force" them to do anything?

Think of Marco Polo, Shackelton, Amundsen, Scott et al... They used to spend years on a mission, facing bad weather, hunger, pests... They remained loyal to the metropolitan authority and generally followed the schedule. The Mars bound crews are going to rely on far better working conditions, communications, etc. Why should they behave differently?

Delvo
2007-Sep-11, 10:30 PM
Early explorers weren't cooped up in small moving cabins, and had frequently-changing conditions to adapt to. The stresses they faced were not the same kind that would be faced by Mars mission astronauts. Notice that I didn't say bigger or smaller; it's a different kind.

And that's one reason why I don't think the fact, which someone else mentioned above, that astronauts tend to be more disciplined than other people, will help much. Discipline is about putting up with things you might not like at the moment in order to achieve something else later. But it fails in even the most disciplined people, if the thing you don't like just keeps going on and on for long enough without ever even the slightest momentary relief. You'd be better off hiring not people who think they'd be willing to put up with it, but people who wouldn't mind it as much in the first place so they're not experiencing so much stress to endure or succumb to in the first place... people who are already naturally more reclusive and solitary by nature. I don't mean total antisocial shut-ins either, just laid-back, introverted people instead of hyperactive ones.

Unfortunately, such people are probably going to be just about impossible to find in an organization that's inherently full of type-A personalities.

crosscountry
2007-Sep-12, 04:18 AM
real non-go getters is what you're talking about.

Ronald Brak
2007-Sep-12, 04:36 AM
One type B among type A's is stable as the type B will either be ignored or the others will attempt to use him as a pawn in their constant power struggles. But one type A among type B's might end up with the type A being voted off the space ship.

3dknight
2007-Sep-12, 06:00 AM
That long of a trip, you should be able to bring your pet. I know u probably can't because they wouldn't know how to live in that kind of environment. They should really work on stablizing the gravity before any human takes that long of a trip in space. It wouldn't be that boring then.

Stuart van Onselen
2007-Sep-12, 07:21 AM
Land men on the moon? If you nay-sayers were in charge from the start, we'd never even have left the trees, let alone the Earth! :)

"Go down to the ground? FAR too dangerous! There are lions and tigers and bears there. It's never been done before, so we just wouldn't be able to deal with it. Besides, in the time between predator attacks, we'd all die of boredom if we couldn't swing from the branches."

Methinks you've been watching too many melodramatic episodes of The Outer Limits. The ones where the crew tears themselves apart without the aliens having to lift a finger, err, pseudopod. ;)

EvilEye
2007-Sep-12, 11:56 AM
A week is a lot shorter than a couple years.

crosscountry
2007-Sep-12, 04:38 PM
yea, and the week was full of work to do. same with Mars, except the other 35 weeks will have a lot less to do - each way.


I expect there will be experiments and probably some form of farming to do being as that might take place on Mars too. We'll want to think of everything before sending people out there.