PDA

View Full Version : Any news about life on Gliese 581c?



suntrack2
2007-Sep-17, 05:14 PM
it was said previously that the glese is a prospective star where one can found a "life forms", or glise is fit to start "life" thereon.

I am doubtful about my information.

01101001
2007-Sep-17, 05:24 PM
it was said previously that the glese is a prospective star where one can found a "life forms", or glise is fit to start "life" thereon.

Gliese 581 is the star and Gliese 581 c is the exoplanet.

Watch for developments here: Wikipedia: Gliese 581 c (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_581_c).


It appears to be the first terrestrial extrasolar planet discovered in the hypothetical habitable zone surrounding its star, where surface temperatures might maintain liquid water and therefore be suitable for life as known on Earth.

It will be a while before we actually have tools for determining the probable existence of life there, like perhaps: ESA's Darwin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_%28ESA%29).

astromark
2007-Sep-17, 07:31 PM
The methods of detection used to 'find' Gliese 581c are a great leap of technology. We know very little of what environment is there. Having recovered the object is not detection of its surface environment. We are some distance from knowing what is there. Be assured that there will have already been giant radio telescopes directed at this object and listening for ET. The silence is deafening. So far.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Sep-17, 09:46 PM
Well, it would be incredible if we heard signals from Gliese 581.

As I've often said elsewhere, the most important aspects of the discovery of Gliese 581 c is that we are able to find such planets and that since it was discovered so soon after the technology became possible, terrestrial planets in close orbits around red dwarfs are in all likelihood very common.

KaiYeves
2007-Sep-17, 10:05 PM
Yeah, just look at Krypton. Oh, wait, you can't because it's gone- sorry.

astromark
2007-Sep-18, 06:32 AM
Well, it would be incredible if we heard signals from Gliese 581.

As I've often said elsewhere, the most important aspects of the discovery of Gliese 581 c is that we are able to find such planets and that since it was discovered so soon after the technology became possible, terrestrial planets in close orbits around red dwarfs are in all likelihood very common.


Yes we can gleam from this that we will find more planets. Finding a planet in the temperate zone of a star means that it may sustain water as a liquid. From that point we can make assumptions about what if... We will and can wait. I want to live long enough to see that space based super massive array of telescopes.. Evidence of alien life has so far eluded us. I am picking one day it wont. Should I look forward to this, or feel worry that they might find us first. Still a little uneasy about this idea. oops did not intend to Trojan horse your thread....

suntrack2
2007-Sep-18, 03:45 PM
Gliese 581 is the star and Gliese 581 c is the exoplanet.

Watch for developments here: Wikipedia: Gliese 581 c (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_581_c).



It will be a while before we actually have tools for determining the probable existence of life there, like perhaps: ESA's Darwin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_%28ESA%29).

thank you very much, both links are interesting and informative. do you think that such prospective planet's orbital speed is medium like earth!, or this is not essential that it must be ditto like earth's speed. :)

sunil

suntrack2
2007-Sep-18, 04:05 PM
it we want to know the orbital speed of such planet then which kepler's law will be most suitable to match with. kepler's 3rd law? if this planet is lightweight in mass than earth, so how many hours will be reduce to rotate that planet with self, as earth is completing it in 24 hours.(subject to the similar size of earth)/ do you think that mass of any planet is dropping some attention of its speed of rotation! (slower or faster)

01101001
2007-Sep-18, 04:27 PM
do you think that such prospective planet's orbital speed is medium like earth!, or this is not essential that it must be ditto like earth's speed.

It's there in the Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gliese_581_c):

Orbital period (P) 12.93 d

Just under 13 days for a "year". Sounds fast to me, not medium, but it is in close to its cooler little star. It is significant that Gliese 581 c is in the habitable zone. I don't see the the importance you might attach to its period, its speed -- except that it is what matches its being in the habitable zone of a cooler little star.


if this planet is lightweight in mass than earth, so how many hours will be reduce to rotate that planet with self, as earth is completing it in 24 hours.(subject to the similar size of earth)/ do you think that mass of any planet is dropping some attention of its speed of rotation! (slower or faster)

That's there, too.

Mass (m) > 5.03 ME

At a minimum over 5 times Earth mass. Big. I don't think they know its rotation speed. They can barely tell it's there. I'm pretty sure how it may be spinning is still a mystery. I don't think the mass has a lot to do with its spinning, judging from various bodies in our own system.

suntrack2
2007-Sep-18, 04:49 PM
Oh, thanks 01101001 for the reply, the habitable zones will set their status as per the circumstances ! as you said above (that speed or time is not the matter in such case). now fully convinced the situation. Question : what do you think about the escape velocity of this glese, if an object reaching from earth's surface into a zero gravity say for in just 11 minutes, so how many minute difference do you expect to escape from the glese's surface ?

sunil :)

01101001
2007-Sep-18, 05:00 PM
Question : what do you think about the escape velocity of this glese, if an object reaching from earth's surface into a zero gravity say for in just 11 minutes, so how many minute difference do you expect to escape from the glese's surface ?

One could calculate the minimum required escape velocity from the minimum known mass.

One cannot know how long that might take -- with an assumed rocket design -- because one doesn't 1) know the radius of Gliese 581 c, to know how far out of the gravity well the rocket would begin, 2) the rotation speed, to know how much of a free boost the planet's spinning gives the rocket, 3) the profile of the atmosphere, to know what drag would be on the rocket, and 4) certainly other details.

Please, don't try to get so far out ahead of our knowledge. We know not much about this place. Don't start planning missions there. It's too early. Wait for more data. Much more data.