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View Full Version : D'oh!: Movie and TV Goofs



SkepticJ
2007-Sep-27, 10:18 PM
The rules are simple, the movie or television goof you mention has to be something you personally spotted without reading about it somewhere beforehand.

My offering, which COULD CONTAIN MOVIE SPOILERS:


In the movie National Treasure, close to the end of the film, on the wooden staircase/walkway thing underneath Trinity Church, when it's falling apart, a wooden board pries loose, which had round nails holding it in.
Round nails didn't exist in the late 18th Century (when the fictional wooden structure under Trinity was built). They were still handmade by blacksmiths and had a four-sided point. As an aside, they were better than some modern nails, thanks to their shape: four flat sides have greater contact area (so greater potential for friction) with the surrounding wood than a round nail; therefore they were harder to pull out.

Krel
2007-Sep-27, 11:17 PM
In the movie "Phantoms", in the scene where the two women are in the Police station, they see where the dead Deputy had fired three rounds from his pistol. The expended rounds are blank rounds, not 9mm casings, you can see where they had been crimped closed.

David.

KaiYeves
2007-Sep-28, 01:01 AM
In the movie Scooby-Doo and the Alien Invaders, the opening sequence is a zoom-in on Earth from very far away, following an out of control alien spacecraft. We fly over the moon, and see a "full Earth". Later, on Earth, we see a half moon in the sky. As is taught in 8th grade Earth Science-
New Moon from Earth= Full Earth from Moon.
Full Moon from Earth= New Earth from Moon.

ineluki
2007-Sep-28, 12:23 PM
The rules are simple, the movie or television goof you mention has to be something you personally spotted without reading about it somewhere beforehand.

Artificial Gravity in 007's Moonraker, it's still my favourite example of bad physics.

I'm usually really good at ignoring bad physics, I can ignore the usual sound in space, I can accept the "we have gravity, but we won't explain it" approch in i.e. BSG or Firefly etc.

What annoys me about MR is the fact that they actually bothered to spin their space station, but created the gravity along the axis instead of outward.

nomuse
2007-Sep-28, 08:23 PM
Yes, an all-time-great "WTF!" moment. The station starts spinning -- and everyone floating in the air falls to the "floor."

Or "The Black Hole," where the artificial gravity is described as the only thing that can keep tidal forces from ripping them apart; and then it is switched OFF as they fall into the hole (with apparently no ill effects).

I was going to mention the "gravity only works when your feet are on solid ground" moment from that movie. Although several movies have that moment, in Black Hole it could be argued for; there might have been some artificial gravity left, but the "I'm falling in" character might have been far enough from the ship for tidal effect to overcome that.

Fazor
2007-Sep-28, 08:40 PM
Well, maybe someone can clear a question up about a possible goof for me then. My g/f made me watch "Remember the Titans" ("made" not so much because I didn't want to see this particular movie, but because I rarely sit for any movie).

If anyone else actually hasn't seen it, it takes place at the time when schools were just beginning to be integrated (I guess this was suppose to be the first school in the area anyway to do so).

Anyway, since it's also about football, it had parts where the coaches would sit and watch old reel-to-reel black-and-white footage of the other team's games. Obviously they had video cameras at that time, but were they common enough and expense-wise feasable enough for highschool teams to videotape every single game? Maybe this was common, but wasn't sure.

Also, during one of the "game montogages" so cliche in football flicks, a penalty was called that wasn't a rule in football at that time. But I can't remember the specifics.

SeanF
2007-Sep-28, 08:56 PM
Anyway, since it's also about football, it had parts where the coaches would sit and watch old reel-to-reel black-and-white footage of the other team's games. Obviously they had video cameras at that time, but were they common enough and expense-wise feasable enough for highschool teams to videotape every single game? Maybe this was common, but wasn't sure.
You lost me. Was it reel-to-reel film or videotape?

IMDB says that true events the movie was based on occurred in 1971. There were fairly inexpensive film cameras at that time.

Was it implied that they filmed every game, or just that they had filmed some and were watching those?

Fazor
2007-Sep-28, 09:12 PM
sorry, i always forget videotape implies tapes. it was reel to reel. and yes, they implied every game, in it's entirety.

I know they had the ability to, but didn't know if they actually did film them all. In fact, I wasn't sure most highschools filmed all their games today.

Larry Jacks
2007-Sep-28, 09:27 PM
Anyway, since it's also about football, it had parts where the coaches would sit and watch old reel-to-reel black-and-white footage of the other team's games. Obviously they had video cameras at that time, but were they common enough and expense-wise feasable enough for highschool teams to videotape every single game? Maybe this was common, but wasn't sure.

In 1971 (when the movie was set), about the only video cameras were expensive units owned by TV stations. VCRs didn't come on the market until the mid 1970s and camcorders a few years after that. I remember seeing some people carry a luggable battery powered VCR on a shoulder strap and holding a video camera. That was in 1976 or 77, IIRC. Those early VCRs cost about $1000 (in mid 1970s money, probably over $3000 when adjusted for inflation) and video cameras weren't cheap, either.

Before that, you had inexpensive 8mm and Super 8mm movie cameras that cost maybe a couple hundred dollars. Film was expensive, though. A pack of Super 8mm movie film cost several dollars to buy and several more to have developed. That was only good for maybe 3-4 minutes of filming before you had to change rolls (been there, done that at Oshhosh 74). You tended to shoot the film in short clips. For a football game, you wouldn't start filming until they were about ready to snap the ball and would quit filming as soon as the play was over (typically less than 15 seconds). Shooting that way would let you capture a dozen or more plays before having to change film. Covering an entire game wouldn't take more than a few rolls of film.

From what the movie implies, coaches sent each other film of their team as a professional courtesy. The film mentions one coach refusing to send any film of his team to the Titans because of racism.

novaderrik
2007-Sep-29, 02:32 AM
modern tv shows or movies that are set in the 60's or thereabouts that have 3 prong outlets in the walls. and modern light switches on the same shows.
i first noticed this on the show "American Dreams" that was on a few years back. it was set in the late 60's, but most of the kitchen appliances looked pretty modern, and the dad's hand tools in his garage also didn't look period correct. i think the telephone was even plugged into the wall with a modern plug.
after noticing that, i started looking for it on everything i watch, and it shows up everywhere.

novaderrik
2007-Sep-29, 02:35 AM
but probably the most blatant screwup i've ever seen was in "History of the World, part 1" where they show a black guy in an afro walk across the screen with a boombox on his shoulder blasting "Funkytown".
i don't know how they let that one thru the editing process..

DaveC426913
2007-Sep-29, 03:14 AM
Jurassic Park

Professor Hammond's 65 million year old mosquito-embedded amber ball on the end of his cane has a seam in it from the molding process, which they take great extreme-closeup pains to show more than once in the movie.

novaderrik
2007-Sep-29, 04:05 AM
Jurassic Park

Professor Hammond's 65 million year old mosquito-embedded amber ball on the end of his cane has a seam in it from the molding process, which they take great extreme-closeup pains to show more than once in the movie.
maybe they did that on purpose, perhaps to show that what they say is going on perhaps isn't what's really going on.
perhaps there's really a wormhole in a back room that they never show that takes you back in time, and that's where the dinosaurs really came from.

Maksutov
2007-Sep-29, 06:25 AM
but probably the most blatant screwup i've ever seen was in "History of the World, part 1" where they show a black guy in an afro walk across the screen with a boombox on his shoulder blasting "Funkytown".
i don't know how they let that one thru the editing process..It was probably approved by Hugh Hefner, who, if you recall, was operating a Playboy Club in ancient Rome.

Of course when Comicus plays the Palace in Rome, the exterior looks very much like a similar building in Las Vegas. It is apparent where the Las Vegan architects stole their ideas from.

KaiYeves
2007-Sep-29, 05:49 PM
Professor Hammond's 65 million year old mosquito-embedded amber ball
John Hammond was not a professor.

ineluki
2007-Oct-01, 10:54 AM
take great extreme-closeup pains to show

Speaking of close-ups, there are the changing tyres in the motorcycle chase in Mission Impossible II. That was really stupid, even for a John Woo movie.

kushan
2007-Oct-01, 01:49 PM
What really got me was a scene near the end of Bourne's Identity, when Jason falls for about 20 metres, lands on some dead guy and is fine. As they say, it ain't the fall that gets you, it's the sudden stop at the bottom.

Krel
2007-Oct-01, 07:38 PM
What really got me was a scene near the end of Bourne's Identity, when Jason falls for about 20 metres, lands on some dead guy and is fine. As they say, it ain't the fall that gets you, it's the sudden stop at the bottom.

Technical term: Sudden deceleration impact trauma.

David.

vonmazur
2007-Oct-01, 10:26 PM
In the Movie M*A*S*H, (1971) there are several errors, all in the football game.....The protective gear is totally anachronistic, they did not have face masks until the late 60's or early 70's, and certainly they had leather helmets in Japan on a US base in 1951.....Fiberglass helmets came from the flight helmets of that era, but later on....

The most esoteric error is the MP's guarding the football game.....They are wearing Jungle issue combat boots, designed and issued in 1966--not 1951. (Most likely only a nut would notice this.....)

Dale in Ala

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-02, 12:18 AM
Not sure if this actually counts, as it wasn't in the BA's review, but in the movie Superman Returns, at the end, Lois Lane is out in her backyard at night, talking to Superman, who is hovering. We can see the lights of Metropolis behind Superman, looking very close, although across some body of water, looking about as wide as Hell Gate in NYC. Above our heroes, there are stars in the sky. I don't know what Metropolis is like, but in New York, New Haven, London and Sydney, I can say from experience that there is too much ambient light to see stars.

Ronald Brak
2007-Oct-02, 01:33 AM
Technical term: Sudden deceleration impact trauma.

Also: Sudden Personal Linear Acceleration Termination or SPLAT.

3rdvogon
2007-Oct-02, 09:21 AM
In 1971 (when the movie was set), about the only video cameras were expensive units owned by TV stations. VCRs didn't come on the market until the mid 1970s and camcorders a few years after that. I remember seeing some people carry a luggable battery powered VCR on a shoulder strap and holding a video camera. That was in 1976 or 77, IIRC. Those early VCRs cost about $1000 (in mid 1970s money, probably over $3000 when adjusted for inflation) and video cameras weren't cheap, either.



As a Brit I know nothing about American football and what coaches do or don't do. However in 1971 I was 18 doing my A Levels (Brits will know what I mean) at a college in the UK. They had a reel to reel VTR system there then. It was of course black and white only the camera was connected to the recorder by a 20 foot (or thereabouts) cable - the recorder was about 24"x24"x12" and I guess weighed around 50 pounds and of course was mains powered (no batteries) - so I guess given those limitations it might have been possible for a school in the US to have had similar equipment. After all we in the "old country" are generally more backward when it comes to this sort of thing.

I bought my first portable Video system in 1981 - the camera weighed about about 7 pounds and could only operate at down to 100Lux it was connected by a 6 foot cable to a portable recorder which weighed about 30pounds which took full format VHS tapes. the nicad battery in the recorder would if i was lucky drive itself and the camera for about one hour so I had to carry a couple of spares at around 2 pounds each. This meant I was lugging around a similar load to your average infantry machine gunner. Mind you this did not stop me hopping in and out of helicopters and landing craft taking video footage in Belize, the Falkland Islands and North of the Arctic Circle in Norway.

3rdvogon
2007-Oct-02, 09:30 AM
Of course one of the goofs that is a slight irritation to me is in my all time favourite movie - Dr Strangelove.

As the Maj Kong's B-52 prepares to bomb the target the Navigator tells them that the distance to the target is 10 miles - then probably about 5 minutes later that distance has only been reduced to 8 miles. Then when they really do start the final run in to the target if you check the time intervals between the distances the navigator is calling out you can estimate that the bomber is flying at only 90Kts - even with "3 engines out" I would expect a B-52 to do better than that i should imagine that 90Kts is well below its stall speed with full flaps.

tdvance
2007-Oct-02, 05:59 PM
One I see all the time: the stars in the sky have a random pattern instead of the constellations we know are there (that is ok in a galaxy far, far away, but not on Earth!). Lots of movies do this--a recent one I saw being "Batteries Not Included".

mike alexander
2007-Oct-02, 07:35 PM
Mentioned this one a couple of years ago. I think the movie was "Inferno", about a solar flare hitting Los Angeles and demicooking it. At the end there is the obligatory happy ending with a huge rainbow arching over LA. In perspective, diminishing into the distance.

Maksutov
2007-Oct-02, 08:50 PM
What, the smaller, farther-away end didn't disappear into a pot of gold?

"Incorrectly regarded as goofs" classic:

The 2001 "goof" where the liquid in the straw Dr. Floyd is sucking on while in a "zero-g" environment, goes back "down". This can be attributed solely to his lungs having created a pressure imbalance between the inside of the container and the cabin pressure. Evidence of its correction is displayed by the liquid moving back into the container. No gravity required.

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-03, 01:29 AM
One I see all the time: the stars in the sky have a random pattern instead of the constellations we know are there (that is ok in a galaxy far, far away, but not on Earth!). Lots of movies do this--a recent one I saw being "Batteries Not Included".
I agree. But then, I think I saw the Big Dipper on Tatooine in one scene.

tdvance
2007-Oct-03, 02:06 AM
In the same vein, I'm an amateur musician and tend to notice how well actors play guitar, piano, etc. Some do a pretty good fake job (or maybe real in some cases), but some aren't even close. Ok, Family Guy Wars did have the cartoon violin bows in sync with the music at least!

Todd

SMEaton
2007-Oct-03, 02:29 AM
In many movies, during a night-time/full moon scene, the image of the moon is inverted (or is that reversed...?). ETA- (or flipped?)

Maksutov
2007-Oct-03, 04:41 AM
In the same vein, I'm an amateur musician and tend to notice how well actors play guitar, piano, etc. Some do a pretty good fake job (or maybe real in some cases), but some aren't even close. Ok, Family Guy Wars did have the cartoon violin bows in sync with the music at least!

ToddBut don't you love how the bowed instruments often produce vibrato while the instrumentalists' fingers on the neck's fingerboard don't move?

Here's another one.

I was surfing channels and happened on a replay of the History Channel's show about inhospitable planets. As every planet was approached, the star fields around it expanded in three dimensions a la Star Trek, which would indicate there are many, many small stars within the boundaries of the solar system.

Not a goof, but instead a matter of aesthetics: it seemed as though every time a new astronomer was introduced, the video had to zoom in, speed up, and then do a circle shot around the astronomer for at least 1080 degrees. I watch shows such as this for the content, not to see half-butted video editor's "creative" effects.

SkepticJ
2007-Oct-03, 03:18 PM
In the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Eddie Valiant complains that he doesn't have a set of keys to a pair of handcuffs--handcuffs use a standardized set of keys.

vonmazur
2007-Oct-03, 09:09 PM
Of course one of the goofs that is a slight irritation to me is in my all time favourite movie - Dr Strangelove.

As the Maj Kong's B-52 prepares to bomb the target the Navigator tells them that the distance to the target is 10 miles - then probably about 5 minutes later that distance has only been reduced to 8 miles. Then when they really do start the final run in to the target if you check the time intervals between the distances the navigator is calling out you can estimate that the bomber is flying at only 90Kts - even with "3 engines out" I would expect a B-52 to do better than that i should imagine that 90Kts is well below its stall speed with full flaps.

"Darth Vader" was the Navigator on that flight......and one other ergregious error, the B 52 stores the bomb in tandem, not side by side as shown by the 1/3 rate FX company in that flick....(Not that anyone expects Kubrik to spend money on a movies' SFX at that time!!)

3rdVogon; I have a question for you, if this is one of your favorite movies: What was Herr Doktor Strangeloves' name in German?? The flunkies only said it once to Gen Turgidson....(Merkwohlliebe??or what did that guy say??)


Dale in Bama

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-03, 09:22 PM
"Darth Vader" was the Navigator on that flight......
I thought he was a navigator on a spice freighter.

vonmazur
2007-Oct-03, 09:24 PM
James Earl Jones==voice of Darth Vader....."Major Kong, come with me, we can rule the Galaxie together........"

Dale

teddyv
2007-Oct-03, 10:13 PM
Commando,

The yellow Porsche on of the bad guys was driving, crashes and rolls on its side. After dispatching the bad guy, Arnie pushes the Porsche back on its wheels and when driving away, we see the side which it was previously resting on is perfectly OK.

teddyv
2007-Oct-03, 10:14 PM
James Earl Jones==voice of Darth Vader....."Major Kong, come with me, we can rule the Galaxie together........"

Dale

Would that be the Ford Galaxie?

Jim
2007-Oct-03, 10:30 PM
... Arnie pushes the Porsche back on its wheels and when driving away, we see the side which it was previously resting on is perfectly OK.

Just more evidence that the Germans' build a superiour product.

Senor Molinero
2007-Oct-04, 03:23 AM
My ears tell me that Strangelove's German name was Perverktdichliebe or literally "perverted love". (pardon the spelling our Deutsche freunden)

DaveC426913
2007-Oct-04, 03:33 AM
One I see all the time: the stars in the sky have a random pattern instead of the constellations we know are there (that is ok in a galaxy far, far away, but not on Earth!). Lots of movies do this--a recent one I saw being "Batteries Not Included".
Pretty hard to prove. The best you can say is you didn't spot any constellations you know.

Absense of evidence is not evidence of absence.

Ronald Brak
2007-Oct-04, 07:58 AM
Pretty hard to prove. The best you can say is you didn't spot any constellations you know.

Absense of evidence is not evidence of absence.

I think there are people on this forum who know the night sky as well as their spouse's face. Possibly even better in some cases.

3rdvogon
2007-Oct-04, 01:27 PM
3rdVogon; I have a question for you, if this is one of your favorite movies: What was Herr Doktor Strangeloves' name in German?? The flunkies only said it once to Gen Turgidson....(Merkwohlliebe??or what did that guy say??)

Dale in Bama

Turgidson:

Strangelove. What kind of a name is that? That ain't no kraut name, is it, Stainsy?

Stains:

He changed it when he became a citizen. It used to be Merkwurkdigliebe.

Turgidson:

Hmm. A kraut, by any other name, huh, Stainsy?

Strangelove:

Yes, but the... whole point of the doomsday machine... is lost... if you keep it a secret! Why didn't you tell the world, eh?

DeSadeski:

It was to be announced at the Party Congress on Monday. As you know, the Premier loves surprises.

You can read the full script here

http://www.visual-memory.co.uk/amk/doc/0055.html

OH! and BTW Darth Vader was not the Navigator, he was the Bombardier.

(disengaging nerd mode now)

tdvance
2007-Oct-04, 06:24 PM
Pretty hard to prove. The best you can say is you didn't spot any constellations you know.

Absense of evidence is not evidence of absence.


trust me--I know the constellations!!!

Todd

Delvo
2007-Oct-04, 06:42 PM
One that bugs me is Gandalf on the bridge in Moria. When the Balrog hits his little magic bubble shield, the close-up of him holding up his staff during the hit is reversed; the wrong arm is up.

CodeSlinger
2007-Oct-04, 07:33 PM
I don't know how much of a goof this counts as. The new TV series, "Chuck", posits that the CIA and NSA stored all their super-secret info on one single computer when compelled by the government to do more info-sharing. Even though the show doesn't take itself very seriously, this premise made me go "ahhhhhhhh!!!".

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-04, 08:43 PM
In Scooby-Doo and the Alien Invaders , the scientists involved in a Project Phoenix-like endeavour say this-
Velma: "What are they doing up there?"
Radio Astronomer 1: "Wasting your tax money?"
Radio Astronomer 2: "As opposed to what we do?"
(They both laugh)
If they don't think their job is important, why are they even doing it?

PhantomWolf
2007-Oct-04, 09:57 PM
A couple of times in Star Wars (ANH) people say things before they happen. Two of the worst are Leia when she and Luke are on the death star bridge ("Hurry they're coming through" before the door starts to open) and Red Leader after his trench run ("I've just lost my starboard engine...." cut to Vader shooting out the engine)

vonmazur
2007-Oct-04, 11:12 PM
Wasn't the navigator calling out the fuel state and distance to the weather ship?? I thought it was Darth Vader......and yes it is the Ford Galaxie, the one filmed in Black and White.....

Merkwuerdig, or Merkwohl, same difference to me.....thanks for the answer on this esoteric mystery....

"Feed me Mandrake........" and " Colonel Batguano, if that is your name..."

all classic, epecially to the military in the 60's...

Dale in Ala

Tobin Dax
2007-Oct-05, 02:19 AM
I was surfing channels and happened on a replay of the History Channel's show about inhospitable planets. As every planet was approached, the star fields around it expanded in three dimensions a la Star Trek, which would indicate there are many, many small stars within the boundaries of the solar system.

According to a number of my students, exoplanets are part of the solar system, so the History Channel may be right.

3rdvogon
2007-Oct-05, 08:38 AM
all classic, epecially to the military in the 60's...

Dale in Ala

Actually this is one of my favourite exchanges of words in the story.

Ripper:
Did they torture you?

Mandrake:
Ah... yes, they did. I was tortured by the Japanese, Jack, if you must know. Not a pretty story.

Ripper:
Well what happened?

Mandrake:
Oh... well... I don't know, Jack. Difficult to think of under these conditions. But, well, what happened was they got me on the old Rangoon HNRR railway. I was laying train lines for the bloody Japanese puff puffs.

Ripper:
No, I mean when they tortured you, did you talk?

Mandrake:
Ah, oh no, I ah... I don't think they wanted me to talk, really. I don't think they wanted me to say anything. It was just their way of having... a bit of fun, the swines. Strange thing is they make such bloody good cameras.

Fazor
2007-Oct-05, 05:37 PM
Ugh, I forgot about this thread, so sorry to bring my post back up, but the question wasn't whether or not it was possible to film HS football games in 1971, but rather if it was practicle. Particularly since they implied that every team did it. Anyway, I wasn't sure if it was a mistake or not but it had been nagging me ever since I watched the movie.

Larry Jacks
2007-Oct-05, 07:09 PM
Ugh, I forgot about this thread, so sorry to bring my post back up, but the question wasn't whether or not it was possible to film HS football games in 1971, but rather if it was practicle.

Using technology readily available in 1971 and citing prices as near as I can recall them, they could've filmed every play of an average high school football game for something like $20-40. High school football games have 48 minutes of clock time. The clock keeps running except when someone calls a timeout, goes out of bounds, or throws an incomplete pass. Given huddles and other things that eat up time, you only end up with a few seconds of action on any given play. A roll of Super 8mm movie film lasted about 3 minutes and would be enough to cover 12-20 plays without a problem. The film cost perhaps $3 to buy and another $3 or so to have processed. If they only filmed their own team, the cost would've been less. Did they do it? Yes, perhaps not every school but a lot of them did.

Fazor
2007-Oct-05, 08:53 PM
Alright, thanks Larry Jacks. That satisfies my curiosity on the subject. Just felt out of place ot me, but admittedly I wasn't exactly around in 1971.

Might be a while before I watch another movie. It's hard to keep my interest that long. But it's fun reading about the mistakes you guys find in others.

Larry Jacks
2007-Oct-05, 10:03 PM
I was flipping through the channels last night and came across the old (1964) movie Fail Safe (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058083/fullcredits#cast) (sometimes describes as "Dr. Strangelove" without the laughs). Other than some good footage of very cool B-58 Hustlers (http://www.aviation-history.com/convair/b58.html) (called Vindicators in the movie) and the surprise of seeing Dom DeLuise (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001123/) playing an Air Force Sergeant (http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0018588/), the movie made many of the types of errors that I've seen all too often. For example, they had a bunch of fighters trying to shoot down the bombers but they kept switching between F-104s and F-106s. Also, when they showed the cockpit of the "Vindicator" (as played by the B-58), they had the crew arranged like you have in a B-52. The 3-man crew of the B-58 all sat in tandem.

Details, folks. Get them right for a change.

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-06, 01:52 AM
Do comics goofs count? As discussed in a pervious thread, the first Fantastic Four comic was published, and set, in November 1961. In their origin, the FF are headed for the moon, to "beat the commies" as Sue Storm puts it. Gagarin had only gone into space that April. Getting ahead of yourself, aren't you, Mr. Lee?

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2007-Oct-06, 08:53 AM
...and yes it is the Ford Galaxie, the one filmed in Black and White...

Is that an Alphaville reference?

I can't figure out if I'm too hip for the room, or not hip enough (before anyone says it, I'm fully aware that if you have to ask, you'll never know).


Back OT, I caught the last half of 2001 on TV a few nights ago, and noticed a "realism" goof that I haven't seen mentioned before. In the EVA sequences (when they're replacing the thingie in the communications array) there's a complete lack of tethers, footholds, handrails, and maneuvering backpacks. The astronauts somehow just float to where they need to be. One shot showed Dave(?) removing the broken part (or inserting the replacement) with his legs floating freely behind him. In that position, he wouldn't have enough leverage to accomplish much of anything.

To be fair to the filmmakers, to get it right they would had to have insider knowledge of the EVA problems during the Gemini missions that were occurring while the movie was still being filmed (Gemini XII had the first completely successful EVA, although the primary objective of Ed White's EVA during Gemini IV was probably "go outside for a while and don't die").

Krel
2007-Oct-06, 09:24 PM
Back OT, I caught the last half of 2001 on TV a few nights ago, and noticed a "realism" goof that I haven't seen mentioned before. In the EVA sequences (when they're replacing the thingie in the communications array) there's a complete lack of tethers, footholds, handrails, and maneuvering backpacks. The astronauts somehow just float to where they need to be.

The orange packs they wore were the space maneuvering backpacks. There are four thrusters at the bottom of the pack, and the orange chest pack had the controls.

I imagine that if they could have found a convincing way to do a zero-g tether, then they probably would have.

David.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2007-Oct-06, 11:17 PM
The orange packs they wore were the space maneuvering backpacks. There are four thrusters at the bottom of the pack, and the orange chest pack had the controls.

I imagine that if they could have found a convincing way to do a zero-g tether, then they probably would have.

David.

Thanks. I'll look more closely for that next time.

That explains how he was able to move around, but I still claim that once at the workstation he wouldn't be able to change that part as depicted. A safety tether to either the pod or the Discovery would look cool, but wouldn't help as a restraint (a waist tether, as used in Gemini XII, would).

Senor Molinero
2007-Oct-08, 02:08 AM
My mistake, it is Merkwürdigliebe. Checked wiki and Babelfish.

vonmazur
2007-Oct-08, 08:44 PM
[QUOTE=GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter;1083470]Is that an Alphaville reference?

I can't figure out if I'm too hip for the room, or not hip enough (before anyone says it, I'm fully aware that if you have to ask, you'll never know).



Actually it was John Ford who made a bunch of movies in black and white, so I thought that if he made a space movie, it would be in B&W.....His B&W style was emulated in Dr. Strangelove....esoteric movie fan pun, sorry...

Dale in Ala

vonmazur
2007-Oct-08, 09:07 PM
I was flipping through the channels last night and came across the old (1964) movie Fail Safe (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058083/fullcredits#cast) (sometimes describes as "Dr. Strangelove" without the laughs). Other than some good footage of very cool B-58 Hustlers (http://www.aviation-history.com/convair/b58.html) (called Vindicators in the movie) and the surprise of seeing Dom DeLuise (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001123/) playing an Air Force Sergeant (http://www.imdb.com/character/ch0018588/), the movie made many of the types of errors that I've seen all too often. For example, they had a bunch of fighters trying to shoot down the bombers but they kept switching between F-104s and F-106s. Also, when they showed the cockpit of the "Vindicator" (as played by the B-58), they had the crew arranged like you have in a B-52. The 3-man crew of the B-58 all sat in tandem.

I second this!! I am constantly amazed at the inattention to detail that the current and former Hollywood Moghuls exhibited!! In essence, they are insulting by implication, our intellegence and these persons assume that the public is as ignorant as they apparently are.....ie: NBC cancelling Star Trek TOS, because the viewers would not buy anything from the low IQ type commercials....

Details, folks. Get them right for a change.

Now for the latest rant und rave: In the totally silly "Last Samurii" besides the historical inaccuracies, there is one glaring error....IF this was supposed to be just after the US Civil War, and Grant was President, this is squarely in the 1870's. Why do the Japanese Army Troops have model 1884 rifles, specifically, they are using, the Infantrie Gewehr Modell 1871/84. Which was manufactured from 1885 to 1888 by the Germans. They did not ever sell any to the Japanese 10-15 years before they were produced.....The producers of this fine flick, went to some lengths to show the Japanese Army, first with Enfield Muzzle Loading Rifles, and then with Cartridge Rifles, but the Japanese bought the Chassepot and Gras Rifles from France, which they turned into the Murata Rifles and Carbines, not the German Mauser, and not 15 years before it was designed!!!

end rant!!

Dale in Ala

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-08, 09:47 PM
BA said this was a goof: In the movie Spider-Man, J. Jonah Jameson claims his son has been to the moon. Obviously, nobody has been to the moon for thirty years, meaning that he'd have to be much older than he appears.
EXCEPT- John Jameson, the astronaut son, was introduced early on into the Spider-Man contiunity, durring the time of Apollo, when this would be relevant. The director was simply trying to be faithful to the comics history.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2007-Oct-09, 07:14 AM
Actually it was John Ford who made a bunch of movies in black and white, so I thought that if he made a space movie, it would be in B&W.....His B&W style was emulated in Dr. Strangelove....esoteric movie fan pun, sorry...

No need to apologize, I'm the one that didn't get it.

In Jean-Luc Godard's B&W SF/noir film Alphaville, the protagonist travels through hyperspace-or-something to get from the Outlands to Alphaville (which bears a remarkable resemblance to mid-1960s Paris) in a Ford Galaxie, hence my misunderstanding (and yes, it's really as strange as it sounds).

Oh, and it also features the Best. Fight Sequence. Ever.

PhantomWolf
2007-Oct-10, 01:39 AM
In the totally silly "Last Samurii"

I am ashamed to admit that much of this was film in and around my home town. :(

WHarris
2007-Oct-10, 03:58 PM
I'm not sure of the exact year, but "The Last Samurai" takes place sometime after the Battle of Little Bighorn, which was in 1876.

vonmazur
2007-Oct-10, 07:10 PM
I seem to remember a reference to that battle in the flic. Still anachronistic and inaccurate, most of the Military Advisors to the Emperor Mejii were German, specifically Prussian, the Naval Advisors were British. The Japanese Navy even adopted English as a Battle Language!! (For a short time before WW 2 I think..)

So it should have been Rittmeister Kruez, not a drunken Yankee from the late unpleasantness!!!

Nota bene: In the German Army the ranks of certain officers were different according to the branch of service, ie: Hauptman=Infantry Captain, Rittmeister=Cavalry Captain....There are some others which escape me right now....Like "Ueberstuermstrassenputzer" the Nazi designation for a street cleaner!!

Dale

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-11, 12:37 AM
"Ueberstuermstrassenputzer"
Ah, nothing like German for tounge-tangling words. Except maybe Russian.

tdvance
2007-Oct-11, 05:51 PM
Just watched Treehouse of horror, #9 I think it was, yesterday.

Kang and Homer were in a fight over the halfbreed-alien Maggie.

One scene, Kang is in his glass "spacesuit", the next Homer punches him and there is no glass. The next scene Kang is again in glass, and the next, Homer punches him again and there's no glass.

Well, It could be a special suit that automatically disappears to allow someone to attack you....

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-12, 01:14 AM
Well, It could be a special suit that automatically disappears to allow someone to attack you....
Lots of movie armor is like that.

tdvance
2007-Oct-13, 02:35 AM
Ok, I just watched the Simpson's episode where Lisa joined Mensa.

The comic book guy (does he have a name?) wore a black tee shirt that said:

C:/dos
C:/dos/run
run/dos/run

ok....we all know dos (and Windows) directory separators are backward slashes: \ instead of forward slashes.

I'm reminded of that every time I try to type a path in Windows (grrr...) why make the ESCAPE character the directory seperator in place of the closer-to-the-home-row forward slash....

Not a goof but a joke: of course there is no "Ebola, RI" (or, I hope there isn't) and no state called USA (for the "Springfield, USA" in the list of 300 worst cities to live in) and the commentators said residents of East St. Louis, MO were a bit upset to find their town on that list as #300, below Springfield at #299.

Edit--I forgot to mention--they did mention Astronomy (at least) once: "do you know what mensa is?" "yes, it's a constellation visible from the southern hemisphere".

Gillianren
2007-Oct-13, 03:35 AM
The comic book guy (does he have a name?) . . . .

Yes. "Comic Book Store Guy."

Delvo
2007-Oct-13, 11:54 AM
the commentators said residents of East St. Louis, MO were a bit upset to find their town on that list as #300, below Springfield at #299.I can't tell which is the joke and which is the actual goof: the "299 below 300 (worst)" thing, or "East Saint Louis, MO".

Noclevername
2007-Oct-13, 03:51 PM
Originally Posted by tdvance
The comic book guy (does he have a name?) . . . .

According to Wikipedia, his real name is Jeff Albertson, mentioned only once on the show.

ineluki
2007-Oct-17, 12:21 PM
Artificial Gravity in 007's Moonraker, it's still my favourite example of bad physics.

I recently saw Wing Commander and it proved to be a worthy contender for the "stupid physics"-award.

The "drop after launch" spacefighters were bad enough, but the "keep silent, or the enemy will hear us" part reached a new level in stupidity.

tdvance
2007-Oct-17, 05:54 PM
not that new--a ST:TOS show, one of the earlier ones, had bridge crew members whispering while sneaking up on a Romulan ship, as if the Enterprise were a submarine.

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-18, 01:28 AM
Yet another from Scooby-Doo and the Alien Invaders (Which is a great movie, by the way.)
Crystal, the ET agent, says that she's dressed "groovy" because she recieved "A SALF message from the '60s describing humans, and I live fourty light-years away."
I don't think anybody was trying to communicate with ET in the 60's using radio astronomy. The Arecibo Message wasn't until the 70's, and it showed only a rough human outline, not details of clothing. She must have meant that she'd recived human TV signals.

Tobin Dax
2007-Oct-18, 04:55 AM
I recently saw Wing Commander and it proved to be a worthy contender for the "stupid physics"-award.

The "drop after launch" spacefighters were bad enough, but the "keep silent, or the enemy will hear us" part reached a new level in stupidity.
A decent explanation (lasers) tickled the back of my mind for an instant, until I realized that if they've got lasers pointed at the ship, they know where it is. :shifty:

ineluki
2007-Oct-19, 11:06 AM
not that new--a ST:TOS show, one of the earlier ones, had bridge crew members whispering while sneaking up on a Romulan ship, as if the Enterprise were a submarine.

Was that really explained as being necessary or could it be taken as anxiety?

Noclevername
2007-Oct-19, 04:39 PM
It's instinctive to lower your voice when trying to be stealthy. But in Wing Commander, a member of the crew actually shushed someone who spoke up (I think-- I've blocked out as much memory of that piece of dreck as possible). WC had bad writing, bad military tactics and bad acting, so why not bad physics to go along with it?

Maksutov
2007-Oct-22, 05:46 AM
In the latest Mormon TV commercial a bunch of events are depicted, all occurring in the northern hemisphere. Near the end the Sun is shown "rising", going "up" of course, but also from right to left.

eburacum45
2007-Oct-22, 01:09 PM
Yet another from Scooby-Doo and the Alien Invaders (Which is a great movie, by the way.)
Crystal, the ET agent, says that she's dressed "groovy" because she recieved "A SALF message from the '60s describing humans, and I live forty light-years away."


And she got here in 2040?

Noclevername
2007-Oct-22, 04:25 PM
And she got here in 2040?

The implication, of course, being that the ET's have some form of rapid FTL or teleportation. What, you expect realistic physics from a show with a talking dog? Ruh roh!

Gillianren
2007-Oct-22, 07:37 PM
There's a reason I don't watch Scooby-Doo.

Fazor
2007-Oct-22, 07:48 PM
There's a reason I don't watch Scooby-Doo.

Is it because the conflict between Fred's apparent thing with Daphne and his obvious tendencies that show he...urm...plays for the other team... are just too mind boggling and detract from the varied and intellectual "grounds keeper in rubber mask" plot-lines? :)

Noclevername
2007-Oct-22, 08:20 PM
Is it because the conflict between Fred's apparent thing with Daphne and his obvious tendencies that show he...urm...plays for the other team... are just too mind boggling and detract from the varied and intellectual "grounds keeper in rubber mask" plot-lines? :)

HUH? What "obvious tendencies"?

Fazor
2007-Oct-22, 08:25 PM
What tendancies? One word: Ascot! :)

Noclevername
2007-Oct-22, 08:39 PM
What tendancies? One word: Ascot! :)

...

It was the Seventies, man. Everyone dressed gay.

Fazor
2007-Oct-22, 08:55 PM
...

It was the Seventies, man. Everyone dressed gay.

LoL. I'm tempted to put that as my sig line, but I wont. :lol:

Noclevername
2007-Oct-22, 09:51 PM
LoL. I'm tempted to put that as my sig line, but I wont. :lol:

I admire your restraint.

SkepticJ
2007-Oct-23, 04:45 AM
Back when I saw The Phantom Menace in theaters, I noticed some Naboo-dude in the movie says, "We'll be sitting ducks!"

You'll now find ducks among the creatures listed as being in the Star Wars galaxy on Star Wars.com--trying to fix this gaffe.

ineluki
2007-Oct-23, 11:44 AM
The Phantom Menace "We'll be sitting ducks!"

They wouldn't be speaking english anyway, so why are ducks a special problem?

I realise this is part of the whole "everyone is speaking" english cliche, but it seems more like nitpicking than a real bad goof.

Tog
2007-Oct-23, 12:15 PM
They wouldn't be speaking english anyway, so why are ducks a special problem?

I realise this is part of the whole "everyone is speaking" english cliche, but it seems more like nitpicking than a real bad goof.

Or you go the Douglas Adams route with it and explain that "ducks" are, in fact, a form of landscape decoration which comes in several varieties; sitting, sprawling, standing, balancing, hanging, and so on, most of which look like soft cheese that's been left in a slightly too warm room for about a week too long. Also, that these are items which fill the role of lawn gnomes here on earth in that their sole purpose for existing, as far as anyone can tell, is to be kicked in the night by any passing teenager that happens to see them.:whistle:

Fazor
2007-Oct-23, 02:13 PM
He should have said, "We'll be sitting wamprats!"

SkepticJ
2007-Oct-23, 04:05 PM
They wouldn't be speaking english anyway, so why are ducks a special problem?

Because it's a real word used for a real animal (Star Wars.com has a photo of ducks (as in the aquatic avian species) on water, or it did years ago anyway--haven't been there in a long time.), which shouldn't exist in another galaxy. One could say the same for humans in Star Wars (though are humans even called "humans" in any of the Star Wars movies?), but humans kinda have to be in the movies...

tdvance
2007-Oct-23, 05:12 PM
...(though are humans even called "humans" in any of the Star Wars movies?), but humans kinda have to be in the movies...

Yes, in a negative sense.

Leia in A New Hope said something to the effect of, "And you call yourself 'human'" to one of those green-uniform guys on the Death Star.

SeanF
2007-Oct-23, 07:32 PM
Yes, in a negative sense.

Leia in A New Hope said something to the effect of, "And you call yourself 'human'" to one of those green-uniform guys on the Death Star.
I'm not remembering that line.

I do remember C-3PO introducing himself to Luke as "C-3PO, human-cyborg relations," though.