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View Full Version : RE: Carolyn Porco talks TED



Unregistered
2007-Oct-05, 03:13 PM
This was a very interesting and inspirational video. She really does captivate her audience by showing her intense enthusiasm for the work she does.

All of these new photos go me wondering...

...Is there some sort of centralized and maybe even official online repository for all the work like this that is done? It seems to me that this kind of information should be available publicly so that anyone can analyze and marvel at it's wonder. After all a lot of this sort of stuff is funded by our tax dollars (not enough IMO).

antoniseb
2007-Oct-05, 03:40 PM
I don't know who posted this, but he/she is talking about the Cassini mission. There is a Cassini website where you can look at all the raw images that Cassini has sent back from Saturn, and links to many press releases about observations and discoveries, as well as see the schedule for upcoming close encounters with Saturn's moons.

ToSeek
2007-Oct-05, 03:41 PM
This is in response to one of the BA's blog entries. (http://www.badastronomy.com/bablog/2007/10/04/carolyn-porco-talks-ted/) Not sure what it's doing here, but I'll leave it so Fraser can investigate.

Unregistered
2007-Oct-05, 04:05 PM
I'm well aware of the Cassini mission. What I'm asking is if there is a centralized place where all of this stuff is stored. For example: a place where you can browse pictures by mission.

And what's wrong with me posting this here? I thought thats what this section is for...The section details read, "If you saw something on Bad Astronomy that you just have to say something about."

01101001
2007-Oct-05, 04:30 PM
...Is there some sort of centralized and maybe even official online repository for all the work like this that is done? It seems to me that this kind of information should be available publicly so that anyone can analyze and marvel at it's wonder.

NASA Planetary Photojournal (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html) has edited content of significant images. For instance, see Saturn images (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/targetFamily/Saturn).

A few missions' organizers provide all their raw images as received. It's mission-by-mission. For instance, see NASA Cassini-Huygens Mission raw images (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/index.cfm).

Eventually all NASA data records wind up in the Planetary Data System (http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/), but sometimes the investigators, in return for their efforts on the project, get exclusive access for many months before release to others.

Other space programs have their own repositories and customs.

Fraser
2007-Oct-05, 04:50 PM
That is really really strange. I'll see if Phil's testing out something to try and get his posts and comments into BAUT.

antoniseb
2007-Oct-05, 05:35 PM
I'm well aware of the Cassini mission. What I'm asking is if there is a centralized place where all of this stuff is stored. For example: a place where you can browse pictures by mission.
There is a place where you can browse all the raw images. The sixth menu item on the right of this page (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm) will give you that.


And what's wrong with me posting this here? I thought thats what this section is for...The section details read, "If you saw something on Bad Astronomy that you just have to say something about."
This is not a criticism of you. Normally we don't ever see unregistered posters in any section except Phil's blog. This is a sign that there is a software configuration issue. In the mean time, why not join?

ToSeek
2007-Oct-05, 11:30 PM
That is really really strange. I'll see if Phil's testing out something to try and get his posts and comments into BAUT.

Even weirder, my comment above showed up on the blog.

01101001
2007-Oct-06, 12:56 AM
Even weirder, my comment above showed up on the blog.

That's that linkback (http://www.bautforum.com/misc.php?do=linkbacks)/trackback/pingback/refback stuff at work. Since you linked to the blog article, software here let software there know it, and a backwards link was created. Magic. Or technology indistinguishable therefrom.