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man on the moon
2003-Jul-22, 02:18 PM
Neil Armstrong and John Glenn honored their fellow Ohio native in a service Sunday.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/Midwest/07/21/aviation.pioneers.ap/index.html

[edited to correct "Neil" instead of "Niel"]

kucharek
2003-Jul-22, 02:27 PM
Niel Armstrong... [-(

Neil. Neil. Neil!!!

Neil Armstrong and Jack Schmitt are surely the moonwalker whose names are most often misspelled. Oh, I guess Alan Shepard also qualifies.
I'll do some Google-statistics....


I searched for the name and "astronaut"

alan shepard 6,390
alan sheperd 25
alan shepherd 371
allan shepard 38
allan shepherd 7

neil armstrong 17,400
niel armstrong 54
neal armstrong 134
nail armstrong 1

jack schmitt 1,020
jack schmidt 91
harrison schmitt 1,910
harrison schmidt 280

So the winner seems to be Jack Schmitt... :P

[edited to add items]

man on the moon
2003-Jul-22, 02:52 PM
Niel Armstrong... [-(

Neil. Neil. Neil!!!

:oops:

it's comforting to know i'm not the only one... :oops: :oops: :oops:

i fixed it btw

freddo
2003-Jul-23, 12:26 AM
Nail Armstrong?

:o :o :o :o

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Jul-23, 12:28 AM
:o :o :o :o

No thanks! That's a website that I'm going to avoid!

Argos
2003-Jul-23, 04:57 PM
Although the Flyer was the first heavier-than-air to get airborne, the first airplane to fly by its own power was the 14-Bis (http://www.chez.com/avion/mois/juin1998.html) - designed and piloted by the Brazilian Santos-Dumont - which flew in Paris in 1906.

The Flyer was catapulted.

Argos
2003-Jul-23, 05:09 PM
As I wasnīt able to edit the above post, read it as

"Although the Flyer has been..."

Kaptain K
2003-Jul-23, 05:23 PM
Ahem!! Gustav Whitehead - 1901, Conn. USA. 8)

kucharek
2003-Jul-24, 07:03 AM
This thread just reminded me about some great tv series I saw when I was a kid. I managed to track it down on the web.
It was a French/Canadian/Swiss/German/Begian co-production about the early years of flight, focusing around a French airplane nut who is somehow involved in everything. The original title was "Les Faucheurs de marguerites" ("The daisy mowers" if my French is good enough) In Germany, it aired under the title "The Grashoppers" I never saw this series aired again, but would very much like to see it again.

Argos
2003-Jul-24, 01:47 PM
Ahem!! Gustav Whitehead - 1901, Conn. USA. 8)

Interesting info. I went to search the web and found some sites about him, like this one

http://www.deepsky.com/~firstflight/

As an aeronautics enthuasiast Iīve always had his name somewhere in the back of my mind. But I always thought that his feat was a hoax. To me, the claim for the primacy of the heavier-than-air flight was a contest involving the Wrights and Santos-Dumont. The former for the first flight, and the latter for the first self-propelled flight.

Some sources Iīve read account that Santos-Dumont met President Roosevelt in 1904. The President was interested in the Dumontīs baloons to use in the Navy. By this time the Wrights had already flown, but they were not believed, even in the US.

Of course we should also cite Otto Lilienthalīs flight with a primitive delta-wing by 1890. It was a heavier-than-air object to fly carrying a man, but I donīt know why that flight is not considered the first one. Lack of trustworthy witnesses, I suppose.

Now try to tell a Brazilian that Santos-Dumont was not the first man to fly...

Argos
2003-Jul-24, 01:49 PM
Ahem!! Gustav Whitehead - 1901, Conn. USA. 8)

Interesting info. I went to search the web and found some sites about him, like this one

http://www.deepsky.com/~firstflight/

As an aeronautics enthuasiast Iīve always had his name somewhere in the back of my mind. But I always thought that his feat was a hoax. To me, the claim for the primacy of the heavier-than-air flight was a contest involving the Wrights and Santos-Dumont. The former for the first flight, and the latter for the first self-propelled flight.

Some sources Iīve read account that Santos-Dumont met President Roosevelt in 1904. The President was interested in the Dumontīs baloons to use in the Navy. By this time the Wrights had already flown, but they were not believed, even in the US.

Of course we should also cite Otto Lilienthalīs flight with a primitive delta-wing by 1890. It was a heavier-than-air object to fly carrying a man, but I donīt know why that flight is not considered the first one. Lack of trustworthy witnesses, I suppose.

Now try to tell a Brazilian that Santos-Dumont was not the first man to fly...

kucharek
2003-Jul-24, 01:50 PM
Lilienthal's flights are pretty well documented and I never saw them questioned. The thing is, it wasn't a motorized flight, it was hang-gliding.

man on the moon
2003-Jul-24, 06:58 PM
yeah...once he even landed in the middle of the Potomac, after taking of from a boat as a publicity stunt. :lol:

the race was for flight in which a heavier than air machine took off and remained in controlled, sustained flight under it's own power. lilienthal glided, but he had no way of sustaining his flight beyond the length of the glide.

that said, gliders were crucial to the development of powered flight. dozen's of experiments were done to discover how to control, what was the best design shape, how to style the wings, etc.

it's too bad there's no video of that first flight...

Argos
2003-Jul-27, 08:28 PM
that said, gliders were crucial to the development of powered flight. dozen's of experiments were done to discover how to control, what was the best design shape, how to style the wings, etc.

it's too bad there's no video of that first flight...

Santos-Dumont tested the controls of the 14-bis by lifting the airplane with a dirigible balloon (http://www.chez.com/avion/mois/aout99.html), so he could assess certain aerodynamic reactions. The system can be deemed the first flight simulator. :)

There is a footage on the flight of the 14-Bis in 1906. A site:

http://invention.psychology.msstate.edu/gallery/airphotos.html