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Maksutov
2007-Oct-20, 06:57 AM
Hollywood writers authorize union to call strike. (http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSN1933406320071020?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews)

What are they going to do once on strike, the same thing they've been doing while "working"?

:think:

Moose
2007-Oct-20, 10:16 AM
What, does this mean we get a break from crap cinema for a bit?

Maksutov
2007-Oct-20, 11:03 AM
What, does this mean we get a break from crap cinema for a bit?Wouldn't that be nice?

Noclevername
2007-Oct-20, 11:58 AM
Oh no! Now who will come up with fresh, original plots and characters? :D

01101001
2007-Oct-20, 01:29 PM
Oh no! Now who will come up with fresh, original plots and characters? :D

It's time for Reality TV to go to the Movies.

Noclevername
2007-Oct-20, 02:04 PM
It's time for Reality TV to go to the Movies.

(Shudder)

novaderrik
2007-Oct-20, 03:56 PM
What, does this mean we get a break from crap cinema for a bit?
they've got about 5 years of "blockbusters" already filmed and ready for release, so you don't have to worry about it. even if they strike for a couple of years, you'll still get to see the next 12 installments in the "Saw" series, and if that isn't your cup of tea, i'm sure they've got a few Ben Stiller movies made where he plays a guy who falls in love with a seemingly normal woman with a screwed up family history with Owen Wilson guest starring as his quirky friend..

phaishazamkhan
2007-Oct-20, 04:49 PM
they've got about 5 years of "blockbusters" already filmed and ready for release, so you don't have to worry about it. even if they strike for a couple of years, you'll still get to see the next 12 installments in the "Saw" series, and if that isn't your cup of tea, i'm sure they've got a few Ben Stiller movies made where he plays a guy who falls in love with a seemingly normal woman with a screwed up family history with Owen Wilson guest starring as his quirky friend..

Oh joy, Rob Schneider will make a cinematic comeback which is a tour de force as he portrays a man who wakes up one morning as an allen wrench!

Parrothead
2007-Oct-20, 04:59 PM
I can see the writers' pov over residuals from DVD, digital downloads etc., especially since residuals make up most of their pay. There may be some agreement yet, that may allow them to continue working while negotiations continue. From the article:
Earlier this week, studios sought to remove a major sticking point in the current talks by withdrawing a proposal to revamp residuals in such a way as to withhold those payments until after production and development costs were recouped.

With creative accounting I'm sure a profitable show could become one showing a loss, giving the Studios an edge. At least they did look at removing that proposal.

That said, if there is a stoppage and it continues to the length or longer than the last one, it may be of benefit to foreign shows getting picked up by US stations.

As the article linked to by Mak states, actors and directors contracts come up next year and I'm guessing they may ask for some sort of similar demand. IIRC, the ACTRA stoppage or threatened stoppage in Canada, last year, dealt partly with issues over residuals from DVD sales, broadband streaming of content, etc.

tdvance
2007-Oct-20, 05:16 PM
I think there are a lot of untapped writers out there--Niven, Pournell, and so on--dump the union and buy scripts from the real writers!
Todd

Gillianren
2007-Oct-20, 07:34 PM
A lot of "real writers" are in the union. A lot of great scripts from union writers never get made, because the studios are too busy giving us The Replacements. And, in fact, a lot of good scripts are rewritten until they don't at all resemble the really good, original stories that were paid for.

Further, there are not "five years of blockbusters already filmed and ready for release." The studios can't afford that kind of backlog; the turnaround from beginning of filming to release is generally within one year, and that includes all work on the film. Another thing to remember about blockbusters is that they generally rely on big names as part of their drawing power, and you can't expect someone to stay a star for five years. (Which is not to say that there aren't people who do, of course, but you can't expect it.) The studios wouldn't risk paying a multimillion-dollar salary to someone who might be on a "where are they now?" show before the movie is released, now, would they?

Finally, let's remember that the TV writers' strike is part of what brought us the glut of reality TV, because those shows don't require much in the way of writing.

Noclevername
2007-Oct-20, 09:43 PM
Just think of what we'll be missing out on without Hollywood writers!

:think:


:think:


:think:


...Nope, can't think of a thing.

novaderrik
2007-Oct-20, 10:31 PM
A lot of "real writers" are in the union. A lot of great scripts from union writers never get made, because the studios are too busy giving us The Replacements. And, in fact, a lot of good scripts are rewritten until they don't at all resemble the really good, original stories that were paid for.

Further, there are not "five years of blockbusters already filmed and ready for release." The studios can't afford that kind of backlog; the turnaround from beginning of filming to release is generally within one year, and that includes all work on the film. Another thing to remember about blockbusters is that they generally rely on big names as part of their drawing power, and you can't expect someone to stay a star for five years. (Which is not to say that there aren't people who do, of course, but you can't expect it.) The studios wouldn't risk paying a multimillion-dollar salary to someone who might be on a "where are they now?" show before the movie is released, now, would they?

Finally, let's remember that the TV writers' strike is part of what brought us the glut of reality TV, because those shows don't require much in the way of writing.

if a studio has a bunch of, say, tom Cruise movies made and just waiting to be released, they will NOT let the world forget about Tom Cruise until the last one has been released. once that last film has it's theater run and is safely out on dvd and pay-per-view, then Tom Cruise is on his own..
don't forget that the same large international conglomerates that own the movie studios also own all the major networks, as well as all the "independent" studios that make all the craptastic shows like Inside Edition, Extra, and Entertainment Tonight that try to make every move of all the "A list" actors seem like something that is so important that if you don't know about it, then your life will be somehow incomplete...

Noclevername
2007-Oct-20, 11:53 PM
if a studio has a bunch of, say, tom Cruise movies made and just waiting to be released, they will NOT let the world forget about Tom Cruise until the last one has been released. once that last film has it's theater run and is safely out on dvd and pay-per-view, then Tom Cruise is on his own..
don't forget that the same large international conglomerates that own the movie studios also own all the major networks, as well as all the "independent" studios that make all the craptastic shows like Inside Edition, Extra, and Entertainment Tonight that try to make every move of all the "A list" actors seem like something that is so important that if you don't know about it, then your life will be somehow incomplete...

Sounds like it's time to schedule a scandal or two. How's Thursday?

Gillianren
2007-Oct-21, 12:47 AM
if a studio has a bunch of, say, tom Cruise movies made and just waiting to be released, they will NOT let the world forget about Tom Cruise until the last one has been released. once that last film has it's theater run and is safely out on dvd and pay-per-view, then Tom Cruise is on his own..
don't forget that the same large international conglomerates that own the movie studios also own all the major networks, as well as all the "independent" studios that make all the craptastic shows like Inside Edition, Extra, and Entertainment Tonight that try to make every move of all the "A list" actors seem like something that is so important that if you don't know about it, then your life will be somehow incomplete...

Okay, show your evidence for this backlog. To give you an idea, it was considered to be a big deal when certain movies from the Orion vaults weren't released for four years after their filming dates, and none of them were blockbusters. (Though one did win an Academy Award, marking the record for the longest period between performance and award.)

Chuck
2007-Oct-21, 01:20 AM
The news reports of a long strike would be more entertaining than anything those writers could write. I hope they can't reach an agreement.

novaderrik
2007-Oct-21, 03:32 AM
Okay, show your evidence for this backlog. To give you an idea, it was considered to be a big deal when certain movies from the Orion vaults weren't released for four years after their filming dates, and none of them were blockbusters. (Though one did win an Academy Award, marking the record for the longest period between performance and award.)
i have no real evidence since it really doesn't affect me- the only movie i actually sat in a theater to see this summer was Transformers, and last year's movie event for me was Clerks 2- but actors are always on talk shows talking about movies they are working on that don't come out for a year or even longer after that date. the big name actors always seem to be "working" (if you can call it that..), but they only put out 1 or 2 movies a year.
i'm not saying there is a huge backlog of big budget films just waiting for release, but the studios will ALWAY have something they can push as the next summer blockbuster. or holiday film. or zany Ben Stiller film that they claim is nothing like the last 20 identical Ben Stiller films (each of which they said was nothing like all the other identical Ben Stiller films..).

sarongsong
2007-Nov-07, 08:39 AM
The media reports the first casualties will be talk shows like Leno, Letterman, et al., and will utilize re-runs instead. Isn't it about time these "professional stand-ups" earn their exorbitant salaries by going on anyway? http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif
(Sorry, Mak---asleepatthewheelitis!)

tdvance
2007-Nov-07, 12:53 PM
The strike is eye-opening--some shows (and I mean, things like talk shows that one would think are unscripted), not pre-written by third-party writers, keep going on. Some shows do not go on because there is nobody to script the unscripted shows and it appears their hosts are more actor than host. It's a way to see where the real hosting/commentary talent is.

Todd

Argos
2007-Nov-07, 01:01 PM
There are millions of people whoŽd be glad to work for the studios for a tenth of the current earnings. Just fire them all and hire fresh folks.

mike alexander
2007-Nov-07, 03:16 PM
There are millions of people whoŽd be glad to work for the studios for a tenth of the current earnings. Just fire them all and hire fresh folks.

This holds for just about any specialized skill or talent. There are plenty of people who think they can do anyone else's job. And usually can't.

You have fifteen minutes. Give me five hundred original words that will make me laugh out loud at least three times. GO

I thought so.

SeanF
2007-Nov-07, 03:19 PM
This holds for just about any specialized skill or talent. There are plenty of people who think they can do anyone else's job. And usually can't.

You have fifteen minutes. Give me five hundred original words that will make me laugh out loud at least three times. GO

I thought so.
Now, don't hold your lack of a sense of humor against Argos. :naughty:

;)

Moose
2007-Nov-07, 03:24 PM
That's one. Only 488 words to go.

Click Ticker
2007-Nov-07, 03:29 PM
This holds for just about any specialized skill or talent. There are plenty of people who think they can do anyone else's job. And usually can't.

You have fifteen minutes. Give me five hundred original words that will make me laugh out loud at least three times. GO

I thought so.

Somehow I don't think the pressure is that high, considering the amount of material that makes it on the air that barely triggers a smile. That, and the amount of duplicate jokes with subtle twists that make it on the air as well.

SeanF
2007-Nov-07, 03:38 PM
That's one. Only 488 words to go.
The words are the easy part. If I get two more laughs, I can fill out the words with gibberish. :)

Like Spock said, though, I'm surprised that Mike gets three laughs per five hundred words of television as is.

01101001
2007-Nov-07, 03:55 PM
The news reports of a long strike would be more entertaining than anything those writers could write. I hope they can't reach an agreement.

Speaking of news, I'm thoroughly tired already of the national news daily reports of which TV shows have gone out of production in the last 24 hours. I'm not looking forward to 4 months of that.

Newscasters: OK, we get that the writers are on strike. Please don't bother us with minutiae. Stop poking at it. Just leave the story alone until the settlement is announced next year. Thanks!

Tucson_Tim
2007-Nov-07, 04:06 PM
Speaking of news, I'm thoroughly tired already of the national news daily reports of which TV shows have gone out of production in the last 24 hours. I'm not looking forward to 4 months of that.

Newscasters: OK, we get that the writers are on strike. Please don't bother us with minutiae. Stop poking at it. Just leave the story alone until the settlement is announced next year. Thanks!

Since I only watch network TV on rare occasions, this strike will have no effect on me except (as noted above) for the incessant "news" stories. :mad:

Swift
2007-Nov-07, 04:22 PM
Since I only watch network TV on rare occasions, this strike will have no effect on me except (as noted above) for the incessant "news" stories. :mad:
Yep. Until the strike effects football and basketball games, old reruns of Law & Order on TNT, and the morning weather reports, it will have no impact on me.

SeanF
2007-Nov-07, 04:25 PM
Yep. Until the strike effects football and basketball games, old reruns of Law & Order on TNT, and the morning weather reports, it will have no impact on me.
I'm going to miss my Heroes, and my 24 if the strike lasts that long.

I was going to say I was going to miss The Office, but that should be unaffected since it's a documentary, right? ;)

Noclevername
2007-Nov-07, 05:45 PM
Mythbusters writes their own material. No hurry.

sarongsong
2007-Nov-07, 06:02 PM
Lights...camera...Action!
November 6, 2007
...the movie studios and TV networks were especially savvy in getting their story out first and foremost about how the writers were to blame for the bargaining talks breakdown...this is the first time the WGA’s side of the story is being told...
Nikki Finke's DHD (http://www.deadlinehollywooddaily.com/deals-lies-backchannelling-why-this-is-a-bigger-mess-now-than-ever-before/)

Gillianren
2007-Nov-07, 06:34 PM
The media reports the first casualties will be talk shows like Leno, Letterman, et al., and will utilize re-runs instead. Isn't it about time these "professional stand-ups" earn their exorbitant salaries by going on anyway? http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif
(Sorry, Mak---asleepatthewheelitis!)

Some of them are members of the Guild. Some of them use members of the Guild to supplement things they're writing on their own. But, yes, some of them just aren't funny on their own. (Frankly, I don't think Letterman's all that funny even with writers, but I appear to be outnumbered on this one.)

Tucson_Tim
2007-Nov-07, 07:00 PM
Some of them are members of the Guild. Some of them use members of the Guild to supplement things they're writing on their own. But, yes, some of them just aren't funny on their own. (Frankly, I don't think Letterman's all that funny even with writers, but I appear to be outnumbered on this one.)

On the radio this morning (NPR) they were saying that the late-night talk show hosts have as many as a dozen writers who write maybe 300 jokes and only four of them are chosen for the monologue.

I may be the only person in America that hasn't seen Letterman. :confused:

Larry Jacks
2007-Nov-07, 07:08 PM
I may be the only person in America that hasn't seen Letterman.

No, you aren't the only one.

Noclevername
2007-Nov-07, 07:11 PM
I may be the only person in America that hasn't seen Letterman. :confused:

Letterman only seems mildly funny when compared to the horribly bland and unfunny competition. None of the late night hosts really push the envelope of funny. Conan O'Brien is slightly better than Letterman, but not by much.

tdvance
2007-Nov-07, 09:49 PM
Yep. Until the strike effects football and basketball games, old reruns of Law & Order on TNT, and the morning weather reports, it will have no impact on me.

Well, luckily, the "sports scripter's union" hasn't announced a strike, so the games will still be played.

That's only half a joke--someone mentioned that some news writers threatened a strike. Darn--reporters would have to start reporting again if news wasn't written anymore.

Noclevername
2007-Nov-07, 11:47 PM
That's only half a joke--someone mentioned that some news writers threatened a strike. Darn--reporters would have to start reporting again if news wasn't written anymore.

Worse yet, they'd have to start ad-libbing on camera. Thus letting us know why most of them are not writers.

Captain Kidd
2007-Nov-08, 12:02 AM
I may be the only person in America that hasn't seen Letterman.

No, you aren't the only one.
Nor are you two the only two.

The plot thickens, looks like writer-producers are stopping all work.
NPR (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=16067518):
In addition, an increasing number of writer-producers who were expected to perform non-writing duties — such as, supervising filming of previously written scripts — have announced that they will not work at all. That list includes Shonda Rhimes of Grey's Anatomy and Carlton Cuse of Lost.

mike alexander
2007-Nov-08, 12:21 AM
I remember reading an interview with Jay Leno a couple of years after he had taken over The Tonight Show. With his background as a standup comic he figured it would be effortless to come out every night and do 10-15 minutes of amusing riffs. He found out almost immediately why his predecessor, Johnny Carson, was known for having the best writing stable in the business. Even ten minutes of new, mildly amusing material on a daily basis (or even four days a week) is very, very hard to come up with.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Nov-08, 12:28 AM
Nor are you two the only two.



The last network TV show that I watched, I forget the name, was about this Cuban fellow, musician I think, and his wife. Episodes were mostly comedic and sometimes involved another married couple, friends of theirs, I think.

Noclevername
2007-Nov-08, 12:55 AM
If the writers of Lost went on strike and they had to just make stuff up at random, who would know the difference?

mike alexander
2007-Nov-08, 01:53 AM
I would. I am quite sure they know exactly what they are doing, even if I don't.

Noclevername
2007-Nov-08, 02:50 AM
The plot thickens, looks like writer-producers are stopping all work.


And soon they'll go back to work, and the plots will thin out again.

Neverfly
2007-Nov-08, 03:20 AM
And soon they'll go back to work, and the plots will thin out again.

Ouch!:D

Chuck
2007-Nov-08, 05:36 AM
If the strike lasts too long they run the risk of a viewer intelligence increase. Then both sides will be in big trouble. But only temporarily.

sarongsong
2007-Nov-08, 06:32 AM
Temporary sanity?---I like that. :)
Hey, how about outsourcing the writing to Bollywood?
Or, in a nod to "The King of Hearts", have the actors write and the writers act? http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

Captain Kidd
2007-Nov-08, 01:23 PM
CNN was interviewing some people about the strike (can't remember who). One of them said something along the lines that if the strike lasts too long, people will stop watching television, and do other things, and we can't have that happen.

Two things popped into my head at that statement. First, The Simpsons episode where Marge gets Itchy and Scratchy cleaned up. All the kids turn off their TVs and go outside to play. Second, the way he said it really gave the impression of a drug dealer worried that if he couldn't get a resupply of his drugs, people might get over their addiction.

God forbid people stop watching TV. I mean, what would humanity do without television? Next thing you know, they might start exercising and eating healthy.

Edited to typo a correct.

Swift
2007-Nov-08, 02:27 PM
God forbid people stop watching TV. I mean, what would humanity do without television? Next thing you know, they might start exercising and eating healthy.
Oh now you're just talking like a crazy person. :hand:

Noclevername
2007-Nov-08, 04:22 PM
I can see the TV viewers protesting now: "Stay on strike! Stay on strike!"

Chuck
2007-Nov-08, 11:52 PM
The WGA Sure Can't Write a Strike Slogan (http://blog.wired.com/underwire/2007/11/the-wga-sure-ca.html)
They may be able to pen some of the most riveting dramas and hilarious comedies this side of the Atlantic, but Writers Guild of America members can't seem to be bothered to think up a witty slogan -- and everyone's a critic.

Krel
2007-Nov-09, 01:17 AM
My favorite:

"Strikers at Rockefeller Center hoisted "On Strike" signs and chanted, "Writers want fair share," but a nearby police officer was unimpressed.

"They're writers. Couldn't they come up with anything better than 'On strike'?" mused the officer."


I say, cut 'em some slack, how can they work...They are on strike after all. :lol:

David.

Maksutov
2007-Nov-18, 12:00 PM
The main problem now is I'm experiencing serious The Daily Show and The Colbert Report withdrawal symptoms.

Where am I supposed to get my news from now, that CNN idiot Glenn BecK?

sarongsong
2007-Nov-18, 06:09 PM
Hold on! :)
November 15, 2007
Walter Cronkite, the TV news icon often described as "the most trusted man in America," is returning to television...November 20...
Reuters (http://www.reuters.com/article/industryNews/idUSN1533399420071115)

Chuck
2007-Nov-18, 07:13 PM
The television networks should start asking computer programming firms to start submitting script writing software. The first attempts will be crude, of course, but products get better fast when there's a market for them. If the human writers think their jobs are about to be computerized their demands will become reasonable real fast.

I'd watch computer written TV shows. I wouldn't expect quality but the early attempts should be funny, especially if the material was intended to be serious. It would be interesting to see the attempts to improve the software.

Gillianren
2007-Nov-19, 01:40 AM
If the human writers think their jobs are about to be computerized their demands will become reasonable real fast.

From what I understand of them, I think their demands are reasonable. They want to get their share of the royalties no matter what medium the finished product is sold in, including digital. That strikes me as perfectly reasonable.

Moose
2007-Nov-19, 02:03 AM
Exactly. The writers were getting completely stiffed, as in "paid nothing at all", for content being delivered over the net. This while the production companies were doing fairly well with that same content.

And take that a step further: these same companies sued YouTube for a billion dollars over the very same content that they refuse to pay the writers for.

Definitely reasonable.

tdvance
2007-Nov-19, 02:13 AM
I guess the question is, why did the writers sign the employment contract if they didn't like the payment terms? There are other writing jobs available, after all. If the producers couldn't hire writers with the terms they offered, they'd have either offered better terms or done without (or even gone out of business).

Noclevername
2007-Nov-19, 02:18 AM
I guess the question is, why did the writers sign the employment contract if they didn't like the payment terms? There are other writing jobs available, after all. If the producers couldn't hire writers with the terms they offered, they'd have either offered better terms or done without (or even gone out of business).

Maybe because at the time they signed, the situation regarding online media were different.

Moose
2007-Nov-19, 02:24 AM
I guess the question is, why did the writers sign the employment contract if they didn't like the payment terms?

Production companies buying onto internet delivery is a pretty new thing, as in "last couple of years" new. It doesn't predate the previous contract in a significant way.

novaderrik
2007-Nov-19, 04:38 AM
The television networks should start asking computer programming firms to start submitting script writing software. The first attempts will be crude, of course, but products get better fast when there's a market for them. If the human writers think their jobs are about to be computerized their demands will become reasonable real fast.

I'd watch computer written TV shows. I wouldn't expect quality but the early attempts should be funny, especially if the material was intended to be serious. It would be interesting to see the attempts to improve the software.

why bother with the computer software? all the scripts were written 40+ years ago- or recently in Britain- just that the names and locations get changed to attempt to appeal to the modern American audience.
or do they need a writer to change names and locations?
altho, i must confess, my current favorite show- Scrubs- seems mostly unique, once you get past that "takes place in a Hospital" thing. but that show is in it's last season, and has probably pretty much wrapped up production by now..

tdvance
2007-Nov-19, 07:55 PM
Maybe because at the time they signed, the situation regarding online media were different.

That could very well be the case--the contract was based on what producers could pay at a given time, and producers are now capable of paying more. Still, you can insist on time limits on contracts (cuts both ways, of course!--you choose: security or flexibility--the writers might have chosen security and now want it both ways) or clauses saying "if you later find a use for my product not specified, the remedy is XXXX".

Noclevername
2007-Nov-19, 07:57 PM
That could very well be the case--the contract was based on what producers could pay at a given time, and producers are now capable of paying more. Still, you can insist on time limits on contracts (cuts both ways, of course!--you choose: security or flexibility--the writers might have chosen security and now want it both ways) or clauses saying "if you later find a use for my product not specified, the remedy is XXXX".

You seem to be assuming that the writers are the ones in the wrong. Why?

SeanF
2007-Nov-19, 09:39 PM
Still, you can insist on time limits on contracts...
That's what's happening here. The basic agreement between the writers and the producers is renegotiated on a regular basis - every three years, I think. They're (supposed to be) negotiating a new contract right now. It was because of a failure to come to terms during that negotiation that the writers have now gone on strike.

So the writers aren't trying to change the conditions of an existing contract - they just want better conditions in the new contract.

Chuck
2007-Nov-28, 02:16 PM
why bother with the computer software? all the scripts were written 40+ years ago- or recently in Britain- just that the names and locations get changed to attempt to appeal to the modern American audience.
or do they need a writer to change names and locations?
altho, i must confess, my current favorite show- Scrubs- seems mostly unique, once you get past that "takes place in a Hospital" thing. but that show is in it's last season, and has probably pretty much wrapped up production by now..
I suspect that the locations are fine. TV watchers don't know any geography anyway. What really needs to be updated are the casual insults that characters throw at each other. 40 year old metaphors won't be understood.

crosscountry
2007-Nov-28, 02:37 PM
What, does this mean we get a break from crap cinema for a bit?



looks to mean more reruns and blech, reality shows.




Good thing I don't watch much tv. Reruns of scrubs and AMC:lol:

crosscountry
2007-Nov-28, 02:46 PM
You seem to be assuming that the writers are the ones in the wrong. Why?

several reasons. Two of which are that striking solves nothing and historically has not shown to get all of the demands of the strikers. Second is that the people striking rarely do it because they want to - the union dictates what people do, and often it is not in the individual's best interest.

crosscountry
2007-Nov-28, 02:54 PM
The main problem now is I'm experiencing serious The Daily Show and The Colbert Report withdrawal symptoms.

Where am I supposed to get my news from now, that CNN idiot Glenn BecK?


Olbermann is pretty entertaining.

Gillianren
2007-Nov-28, 06:42 PM
Two of which are that striking solves nothing and historically has not shown to get all of the demands of the strikers.

All? No. However, striking does get quite a lot done, as even the most cursory research of the history of the labour movement will show.

crosscountry
2007-Nov-28, 11:43 PM
I see strikes giving more incentive to outsource our economy.


Many unions strike themselves out of a job.



That Bollywood suggestion may not be far off.

jamestox
2007-Nov-28, 11:55 PM
I see strikes giving more incentive to outsource our economy.

Many unions strike themselves out of a job.

That Bollywood suggestion may not be far off.

Or illegal alien writers doing the work that American writers won't....

;)

novaderrik
2007-Nov-29, 12:08 AM
Or illegal alien writers doing the work that American writers won't....

;)
and if you refuse to watch any of the shows the illegals write- no matter how bad they are- you are considered a closed minded racist.
so, people would watch, if only to prove to their peers that they, indeed, aren't racists.

Noclevername
2007-Nov-29, 12:37 AM
several reasons. Two of which are that striking solves nothing
I'd love to see you back that up with facts.


and historically has not shown to get all of the demands of the strikers.

Yes, strikers know that , which is why they negotiate.


Second is that the people striking rarely do it because they want to - the union dictates what people do, and often it is not in the individual's best interest.
Again, can you provide some factual evidence?

Maksutov
2007-Nov-29, 03:50 AM
Olbermann is pretty entertaining.Agreed. I've found myself counting down with him more frequently than before. I really like his usual sign-off: "XXXX days since 'Mission Accomplished'."

Maksutov
2007-Nov-29, 03:52 AM
[edit]Many unions strike themselves out of a job....That's what happened to the brass industry in Waterbury, CT.

crosscountry
2007-Nov-29, 04:33 AM
Or illegal alien writers doing the work that American writers won't....

;)


You got a big ol laugh out of that :lol: