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RickJ
2007-Oct-21, 12:45 AM
vdB 142 is the small mostly brown reflection nebula in the elephant trunk. It looks a bit ghostly with two bright eyes looking back at us. IC 1396 is a huge emission nebula/star cluster of which this is but a very small part. This part is usually called the "Elephant Trunk". O and B stars of the cluster create the elephant trunk when their stellar winds hit denser, dark star forming regions. The shock front of the collision lights up brightly in the characteristic pink color of hydrogen alpha light. The elephant trunk points back to the stars that created it well off frame to the left. This guy is about 3000 light years away though I find estimates that are all over the board on it.

This is a combination of 3 H-alpha 30 minute frames and 6 10 minute luminosity frames added together to create the L image for an LRGB version of this area. RGB frames are 2 10 minute frames in each color. All were binned 2x2. Taken with my 14" LX200R with an STL-11000XM on a Paramount ME.

This has been severely cropped, reduced and compressed for band width limits. The full image with less compression is at:
http://www.usenet-replayer.com/cgi/content/framebanner_3?http://www.usenet-replayer.com/1/5/6/7/1192257651.11.jpeg

Rick

winensky
2007-Oct-21, 01:33 PM
Wonderful. Your dark region and dust cloud work just keeps getting better.

Kind regards
Matt

fogged in
2007-Oct-21, 04:03 PM
Id sure like to see how yo 'pros' make these tri color photos and stack them together in the computer.......... I am floored every time I see one. That's fantastic.

RickJ
2007-Oct-21, 05:31 PM
Id sure like to see how yo 'pros' make these tri color photos and stack them together in the computer.......... I am floored every time I see one. That's fantastic.

For a basic discussion see this link:
http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/LRGB.html

It gets a bit more complicated when mixing Narrow band and unfiltered images for the luminosity layer as I did for this shot. Otherwise it is about the same as I do it. I do have an added step as my scope is very temperature sensitive. As the temp drops my image scale changes. So besides just aligning the images I have to rescale them to match as well. First to last frame may chang 4 to 10 pixels in size with a large temperature drop as I had when doing this shot. Stacking software can do this automatically for you making it rather easy.

Also he is using Photoshop 5.5 which doesn't do 16 bit imaging like the newer versions. Things are a bit easier with the CS versions as you don't have the problems of clipping the histogram that you do with earlier versions.

Still the basic idea is the same.

Rick

andyschlei
2007-Oct-21, 06:26 PM
Rick,

Great shot. The detail in the dust clouds is amazing and the colors look really good.

--Andy

winensky
2007-Oct-21, 11:34 PM
Thanks for the LRGB reference Rick.

Kind regrds
Matt

fogged in
2007-Oct-22, 07:34 AM
Thanks RickJ................. having virtually no digital sensitive brainwaves or digital manipulation experience............ I'm going to have to re read that a few times to begin to understand it.
Astronomical photography is not my expertise. I am mostly into water, fog and other 'scenic' photography, but I have always loved the stars above............. and I don't even own a digital camera. Digital terminology is still pretty much like a foreign language to me.
I still live in the KR25 and KR64 era. ..... heck, I bet some young whipper snappers here have no clue as to my KR references. hee hee :D I am only 50, but stuck in my ways. Partly because of budget restraints, but also because of the money I have invested in my 35mm camera system.
You guys have some fantastic photos here.

peeb61
2007-Oct-22, 09:00 AM
What can I say about an image like that......Mate you have caught it head on,
Stucture, colour and depth, just stunning....it's a shame it only scrapes the horizon from my location. So now I know what it looks like. Maybe I could stand on my tipee toes!

Well done Rick!

Paul

RickJ
2007-Oct-22, 05:12 PM
What can I say about an image like that......Mate you have caught it head on,
Stucture, colour and depth, just stunning....it's a shame it only scrapes the horizon from my location. So now I know what it looks like. Maybe I could stand on my tipee toes!

Well done Rick!

Paul

Having the core of the galaxy overhead instead of scraping the horizon as it does for me would seem more than adequate compensation to me!

When I was there last year Vega seemed to scrap the horizon! At least it was darned low. Unfortunately, I had 4 days as Alice Springs and a good 6" scope, it misted all 4 days. Everyone kept telling me that was the first winter rain there in years. Such was my luck seeing your skies. I only got in two good nights and those were in NZ on the north end of the north island. But one of those nights I had access to a 14" f/7 Newtonian. Got nosebleeds up that high on the ladder but sure was fun seeing all the stuff below my horizon at 47N.

Even in my 6" f/4 I quickly decided we have nothing up here to compare to your Eta Carinae complex. I had no photo gear. You could spend years just on that object alone.

You can't really see vdB 142 visually. Even the star cluster/nebula it is in is so large it is difficult to see visually. This is mostly a photographic object.

Rick

JAICOA
2007-Oct-22, 11:03 PM
A Beautiful shot of this reflective nebula, dust clouds and color is simply fantastic Rick, Clear Skies

tvdavis
2007-Oct-24, 04:07 PM
Always a perennial favorite. Well done.

Tom

stargazer_7000
2007-Oct-27, 12:59 PM
very well done, Rick!!