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View Full Version : MOND and Bode's Law



parallaxicality
2007-Oct-21, 09:35 AM
I admit, you can't get more ATM than this, but I've been musing about something. The central tenet of MOND, if I understand it correctly, is that at very low accellerations the increase in the force of gravity ceases to be exponential and becomes linear.

It's strange that the same thing also happens to Bode's Law at the edge of the Solar System.

Between Mercury and Uranus, the orbits are roughly exponential.

After Uranus, they appear to become linear. Uranus is roughly ten AU from Neptune, which is roughly ten AU from Pluto.

Now here's the really freaky bit: Pluto is roughly ten AU from the Kuiper cliff, and the Kuiper cliff is roughly 20 AU from Eris.

Just a thought.

Hornblower
2007-Oct-21, 01:07 PM
I admit, you can't get more ATM than this, but I've been musing about something. The central tenet of MOND, if I understand it correctly, is that at very low accellerations the increase in the force of gravity ceases to be exponential and becomes linear.

It's strange that the same thing also happens to Bode's Law at the edge of the Solar System.

Between Mercury and Uranus, the orbits are roughly exponential.

After Uranus, they appear to become linear. Uranus is roughly ten AU from Neptune, which is roughly ten AU from Pluto.

Now here's the really freaky bit: Pluto is roughly ten AU from the Kuiper cliff, and the Kuiper cliff is roughly 20 AU from Eris.

Just a thought.

Whatever similarity of patterns you are seeing is a coincidence.

A comparison of the relative spacings of the planets' orbits with what is predicted by Bode's "law" does not address the relation between distance and gravitational acceleration toward the Sun.

As I understand it, the motions of the planets are in good agreement with Einstein's GR theory of gravitation, which in turn is in good agreement with Newton's simple formula except in extreme cases such as Mercury. MOND, if it is real, apparently is insignificant at the Solar System level.