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EvilEye
2007-Oct-23, 11:56 PM
In the Saturn episode, I learned that the rings may not have been there when we first walked the Earth, and may eventually be gone.

My question is... Would a future scientist ever be able to know (without our records) that they were ever there?

We, with today's science seem to have been able to uncover the distant past, and come pretty close to guessing the future, but when something doesn't leave a trail, does that throw everything off?

Let me put it a different way.

If no human in history could had ever seen in color. Would we know that color existed? I don't mean shades of white to black. I mean COLOR. Would we have ever found infra-red or ultra-violet? Gamma? Even X-rays?

If the rings of Saturn disappear.. wil our future cosmologists ever be able to guess that the planet once had them?

astromark
2007-Oct-24, 12:59 AM
Quite simply... No.

Regarding the human eyes ability to distinguish between color Hughes. Yes/No. Color definition is a learned process. Your ability to differentiate between those shades of Grey are all some have. With experience and education you have learned to name these Hughes as others see them. The fact that seeing the yellow banding of the tiger in the long grass could be reason enough for the evolutionary track to have honed in on color perception skills. Color is a narrow part of the whole energy spectrum. Today it might be handy if we could see infa-red. Where do I find a genetics wizard?...

History will wright that Saturn has rings for a while yet anyways...
Hypothetically ... No we would not know.

EvilEye
2007-Oct-24, 03:02 AM
Quite simply... No.

Regarding the human eyes ability to distinguish between color Hughes. Yes/No. Color definition is a learned process. Your ability to differentiate between those shades of Grey are all some have. With experience and education you have learned to name these Hughes as others see them. The fact that seeing the yellow banding of the tiger in the long grass could be reason enough for the evolutionary track to have honed in on color perception skills. Color is a narrow part of the whole energy spectrum. Today it might be handy if we could see infa-red. Where do I find a genetics wizard?...

History will wright that Saturn has rings for a while yet anyways...
Hypothetically ... No we would not know.

Well duh.. I know we can't "see" infra-red...But my point was, if we didn't see colors at all... how would we even know in the first place to look for it?

And if we didn't know about that, then how would we know to look deeper?

I only used color as an example.

If the rings were NOT there, and then Were, and then were NOT again, and someone after all that looked at Saturn as a sphere with no rings... would they ever be able to detect that there HAD been rings?

Noclevername
2007-Oct-24, 03:05 AM
Every gas giant has some faint dust rings. After Saturn loses its crowning glory, that will be all that's left; it'll just be Jupiter's little brother after that.

astromark
2007-Oct-24, 03:23 AM
Well, Duh... you asked that question which I answered. No.

The ability of a living being to comprehend its environment is a mater of survival. Our senses are a result of our environment. I thought I was offering you another view.
We would not be able to look deeper. If they are gone. they are gone. I understood you perfectly the first time. And will not respond again to your sarcasm.

EvilEye
2007-Oct-24, 10:54 AM
I wasn't duh-ing you.. I was duh-ing myself.