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ToSeek
2007-Oct-26, 03:24 PM
http://www.blogthings.com/howsyourvocabularyquiz/

"A" for me ("A+" is the highest grade), but I looked up the one I got wrong and think it's open to argument.

Doodler
2007-Oct-26, 03:26 PM
Your Vocabulary Score: B+

01101001
2007-Oct-26, 03:35 PM
[...] but I looked up the one I got wrong and think it's open to argument.

The answers are indisputably correct -- says I.

Cougar
2007-Oct-26, 03:36 PM
I looked up the one I got wrong and think it's open to argument.
I guess I missed one, too. How do I look up the one I missed? (I'm sure I'll disagree. :lol: )

Tucson_Tim
2007-Oct-26, 03:36 PM
My score was "A" also - it's too easy.

ToSeek
2007-Oct-26, 03:38 PM
I guess I missed one, too. How do I look up the one I missed? (I'm sure I'll disagree. :lol: )

I went back and forth changing my answers until I found one that raised my grade instead of lowering it. My problem word was "peruse".

SeanF
2007-Oct-26, 03:49 PM
I went back and forth changing my answers until I found one that raised my grade instead of lowering it. My problem word was "peruse".
I got an A originally, and when I changed my answer for "peruse" it went to A+.

From looking at the definition at dictionary.com, though, it appears that I was wrong - but in not insubstantial company. :)

Cougar
2007-Oct-26, 03:50 PM
I went back and forth changing my answers until I found one that raised my grade instead of lowering it. My problem word was "peruse".
Ah. Mine, too. It seems there is some controversy over the "correct" meaning of peruse.


USAGE NOTE: Peruse has long meant “to read thoroughly” and is often used loosely when one could use the word read instead, as in The librarians checked to see which titles had been perused in the last month and which been left untouched. Seventy percent of the Usage Panel rejected this example in our 1999 survey. Sometimes people use it to mean “to glance over, skim,” as in I only had a moment to peruse the manual quickly, but this usage is widely considered an error. In a 1988 survey, 66 percent of the Panel found it unacceptable, and in 1999, 58 percent still rejected it.

So the "skim" definition is becoming more and more acceptable as years go by. Mathematically, judging from the trend, the "Panel" should be evenly split on the issue in 2007.

SeanF
2007-Oct-26, 03:54 PM
Ah. Mine, too. It seems there is some controversy over the "correct" meaning of peruse.
I propose that if you, ToSeek, and I all think it means "to read quickly," then that's what it means.

The quiz is, in point of fact, wrong.

:D

Moose
2007-Oct-26, 04:37 PM
My vocabulation is splendifferously cromulent at the best of times.

A-. I deliberately passed on the "peruse" one as I would have gotten it wrong had I not read the thread. The other one I got wrong was Quixotic, which wasn't a surprise, my not having read the book.

Speaking, I absolutely adore answer 3 to question 13.

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-26, 04:57 PM
B- for me (about what I expected.


I deliberately passed on the "peruse" one as I would have gotten it wrong had I not read the thread.
Funny, that's one of the ones that I had confidence in.

Speaking, I absolutely adore answer 3 to question 13.
Number 10 didn't have the answer I was looking for... :whistle:

Don't fret that you didn't get every word right, your vocabulary can be easily ameliorated!
I have no clue why a lost female pilot has anything to do with this.

cjl
2007-Oct-26, 05:00 PM
A-

I too missed peruse and quixotic.

Argos
2007-Oct-26, 05:12 PM
I swear I´m not cheating: A - Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.

I think I should be proud. :)

Well, actually it was easier to me than it would be to a native speaker, since 80% of the words either have a Latin root or are associated with the Latin culture [e.g. Don Quixote].

suntrack2
2007-Oct-26, 05:27 PM
they said, sunil take this time B+ and further advice me to see the dream for A+.

:)

sunil (nice quiz here)

darkhunter
2007-Oct-26, 05:37 PM
***Your Vocabulary Score: A+***


Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.

:)

Casus_belli
2007-Oct-26, 05:45 PM
A "peruse" based "A" here too

rigel
2007-Oct-26, 06:01 PM
wow, I know those words now. 3 weeks ago when I got out the hosptial there were many words I didn't remember. I was taken to the hospital when I had a seisure at work. It was several days before I could talk or remember the names of almost anything. Amazing how the brain works.

SeanF
2007-Oct-26, 06:16 PM
Speaking, I absolutely adore answer 3 to question 13.
13's actually not a very good question. I can imagine certain people knowing exactly what "lithe" means but coming up with a different answer for how the woman should feel. :)



"Would you hold it against me?"

Argos
2007-Oct-26, 06:22 PM
Yeah, Tongan women could be offended... The relativity of cultures...

PetersCreek
2007-Oct-26, 06:37 PM
I too rank among the Perusians by scoring "A"

SMEaton
2007-Oct-26, 06:53 PM
If hadn't so phlegmatically perused this thread I would've gotten a "A-". By the way, it seems "quixotic" could be a combination of the 2nd and 3rd answers: fast to act and idealistic.

Lianachan
2007-Oct-26, 06:56 PM
***Your Vocabulary Score: A+***


Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.
Pretty easy, A+ first time without reading the thread.

mike alexander
2007-Oct-26, 07:00 PM
First A+ I've gotten in ages.

Swift
2007-Oct-26, 08:06 PM
Your Vocabulary Score: A-
Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.

I don't know which one I got wrong.

Van Rijn
2007-Oct-26, 09:00 PM
A+, though I'm not sure I would have gotten "peruse." I think I would, but I would have had to think about it, and unfortunately I read the discussion about it first.

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-27, 01:55 AM
A-. SATs, here I come!

jumbo
2007-Oct-27, 04:21 AM
A.
I also made the same error with the word peruse.

Im not going to get too big for my boots if an online test gives me an A though as when it comes to them im guilty of floccinaucinihilipilification.

mike alexander
2007-Oct-27, 04:36 AM
A problem with 'peruse' is the common phrase 'peruse carefully', which implies that to just peruse is to be less than thorough. Like 'the very best'. Best is already the superlative, it can't get better.

Chip
2007-Oct-27, 04:53 AM
A+, though I'm not sure I would have gotten "peruse." I think I would, but I would have had to think about it, and unfortunately I read the discussion about it first.

I suspect that people these days who use "peruse" tend to use it to imply taking a "glance" or "looking over" something, but it originally meant to examine slowly or carefully.

I got an A+ (which don't mean I always been using them educated words.)

hhEb09'1
2007-Oct-27, 05:35 AM
A+


I don't know which one I got wrong.Is an A- two wrong?

absael
2007-Oct-27, 07:38 AM
Well, if "quixotic" ever comes up in conversation I'll know what it means now. And despite the fact that I missed one, I agree that it was easy. If you want a vocabulary workout, read a Stephen R. Donaldson book. It's obvious that he's trying to us as many big words as possible, but if you take the time to look them up you'll definitely come away with a better vocabulary.

cjl
2007-Oct-27, 07:41 AM
A+
Is an A- two wrong?
Yep - it appears to drop one partial grade (A to A-, A- to B+, etc) for each incorrect answer.

Kaptain K
2007-Oct-27, 09:45 AM
Your Vocabulary Score: A-

reidenschneider
2007-Oct-27, 09:47 AM
***Your Vocabulary Score: A-***

Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.

what did i win? a- is how many wrong? :doh:

reidenschneider
2007-Oct-27, 10:00 AM
Etymology:
Middle English, to use up, deal with in sequence, from Latin per- thoroughly + Middle English usen to use
Date:1532

1 a: to examine or consider with attention and in detail : study b: to look over or through in a casual or cursory manner 2: read; especially : to read over in an attentive or leisurely manner.

it would seem that both usages are correct (as per o.e.d) :confused:

now have a+ by correcting peruse.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Oct-27, 10:31 AM
D+

Why should I fill my brain with all these words when I can find their meaning using the MSTS-Dictionary (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/4175) in Firefox?

:o

mahesh
2007-Oct-27, 11:17 AM
Your Vocabulary Score: A-
Congratulations on your multifarious vocabulary!
You must be quite an erudite person.

I don't know which one I got wrong.

Me, too!

Daddy daddy, what does erudite mean?......

reminds me of the time..... once, a lady on a bus, called my baby, 'darling', he was shade over three then,
he turns around and says, 'I am not darling, I am Flynn!'.......

grant hutchison
2007-Oct-27, 12:06 PM
A+.
I had no idea there was a usage for "peruse" that didn't involve care and attention, so I guess I may be causing confusion when I tell people that I'm going to need time to peruse their documents.
My objection would be to their definition of "serendipity": none of the "other words" on offer is a true synonym for serendipity, though of course one is much closer to doing the job than the other two.

Grant Hutchison

Tinaa
2007-Oct-27, 12:25 PM
A+ Like Grant, I've requested time to peruse a paper. Could be, because I'm such a terrible speller, I carried a dictionary to classes. Reading a dictionary when one is bored can be fun.

Argos
2007-Oct-27, 01:04 PM
I learned 'peruse' on this site, years ago. The way people employed it sounded like it meant a quick reading. I went to the dictionary to learn that it was really about careful inspection of a text.

hhEb09'1
2007-Oct-27, 01:33 PM
I looked up the one I got wrong and think it's open to argument.Of course--this is the BAUT :)
Etymology:
Middle English, to use up, deal with in sequence, from Latin per- thoroughly + Middle English usen to use
Date:1532

1 a: to examine or consider with attention and in detail : study b: to look over or through in a casual or cursory manner 2: read; especially : to read over in an attentive or leisurely manner.

it would seem that both usages are correct (as per o.e.d) :confused:

now have a+ by correcting peruse.I dunno, I don't think that works. The quiz options were "Read it quickly" and "Read it carefully". Notice, in the part that you italicized, neither "attentive" nor "leisurely" implies quickly. Even the usage example that Cougar cited (still found wrong by the majority of the usage panel) said "peruse quickly". If peruse implied quickly in the mind of that user, why would you have to add the "quickly"? So, it doesn't. As grant says, peruse implies a length of time, whether or not you read it carefully or casually.

Just as in the example of serendipity, where there is no perfect answer, clearly there is a best answer.

PS: I think you all deserve A++ for trying. And I wish you were running for president.

grant hutchison
2007-Oct-27, 04:04 PM
Of course--this is the BAUT :)I dunno, I don't think that works. The quiz options were "Read it quickly" and "Read it carefully". Notice, in the part that you italicized, neither "attentive" nor "leisurely" implies quickly. Even the usage example that Cougar cited (still found wrong by the majority of the usage panel) said "peruse quickly". If peruse implied quickly in the mind of that user, why would you have to add the "quickly"?Yes indeed.
My current, multivolume Oxford English Dictionary provides a number of obsolete usages involving careful scrutiny, and then:
To read through or over; to read thoroughly or carefully; hence (loosely) to read.This fits with the example above, where it seems that peruse is being used to mean "read", rather than "read quickly".

Grant Hutchison

Fazor
2007-Oct-27, 04:09 PM
My word knowing is very not good. Okay not very not good, but not...good.
;) (B)

Kinda suprises me, because I consider myself to have a decent, yet not overly austentatious vocabulary. See? Austentatious? (Note: I never said I could spell).

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-27, 10:43 PM
reminds me of the time..... once, a lady on a bus, called my baby, 'darling', he was shade over three then,
he turns around and says, 'I am not darling, I am Flynn!'.......
In track practice once-
Girl 1: "I'm hot!"
Girl 2: "I'm tired!"
Girl 3: "I'm thirsty!"
Me: "I'm Kai!"

Gillianren
2007-Oct-28, 08:35 PM
PS: I think you all deserve A++ for trying. And I wish you were running for president.

Nah. Even if I weren't too young.

It's "ostentatious," Fazor.

Graybeard6
2007-Oct-28, 08:57 PM
Since almost all of us who scored "A" missed "Peruse" maybe we should file a class-action suit against the web site owner. I kow I've suffrered irreperable harm to my reputation by not grtting my deserved "A+",

Jeff Root
2007-Oct-28, 11:58 PM
I got A+, so I can pretend to be superior and snooty. I agree with
Gillian, though: You wouldn't want me for President. Neither would I.
Hmmm. That reminds me of what I said (or perhaps merely intended
to say) to my fellow members of the Experimental Spacecraft Society
after the founder called it quits: I was incompetent to lead the group,
but I was the most competent person remaining. I was never able
to discern whether the founder was competent. She quit after she
and I disagreed about whether we should decide exactly what we
wanted to do.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gemini
2007-Oct-29, 04:04 AM
A-

Whirlpool
2007-Oct-29, 02:52 PM
I am so ashamed of myself....

B-

:sad:

Fazor
2007-Oct-29, 02:54 PM
Nah. Even if I weren't too young.

It's "ostentatious," Fazor.

please refer to the end of that post. :)

closetgeek
2007-Oct-31, 03:10 PM
I don't want to say what my score was but I would imagine just reading most of my posts, you can probably guess. Hey it says I am not eelitorit.

http://www.blogthings.com/howsyourvocabularyquiz/

"A" for me ("A+" is the highest grade), but I looked up the one I got wrong and think it's open to argument.