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Owen217a
2007-Nov-07, 04:07 PM
THE TWO-SLIT EXPERIMENT WITH ELECTRONS
(Experiment DS – e – 727 – 0,1 – 2)

The two-slit experiment with electrons (Experiment DS – e – 727 – 0,1 – 2) is described below:

Electrons moving at a velocity V = 727 cm/sec (that is, λ = 0,01 cm according to L. de Broglie law), pass through two slits S1 and S2 of width d = 10λ, namely d = 0,1 cm (d = 1 mm). Slits S1 and S2, lie at a distance b = 2 cm from one another.
Also, distance between slits S1,S2 and screen S is L = 100cm.


Thus, in this case, (if Quantum Mechanics truly applies) the electrons passing through the two slits S1 and S2 should form on screen S bright fringes (electron concentration) and dark fringes (zero electron concentration).

The following question is being raised:
In experiment DS – e – 727 – 0,1 – 2 the electrons passing through the two slits S1 and S2 will cause bright and dark fringes to form on screen S will these fringes lie at a stable distance f = 0,5 cm from one another, as Wave Mechanics asserts?

My opinion on the above question is NO!

In other words:
The electrons passing through the two slits S1 and S2 will fall directly onto screen S, without ever forming bright and dark fringes, as Wave Mechanics sates.

Experiment DS – e – 727 – 0,1 – 2 is a simple and low-cost experiment to conduct.
Consequently, the results of experiment DS – e – 727 – 0,1 – 2 will allow us to establish once and for all whether Wave Mechanics (and thus Quantum Mechanics) are two accurate or wrong Theories of Physics.

CONCLUSION

In order to verify whether Wave Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics are two accurate or erroneous Theories of Physics, their experimental checking should be conducted only through “pure diffraction experiments” (P.D.E.).
In no case whatsoever should this checking take place by means of non “pure diffraction experiments” (i.e. experiments involving the use of crystals), such as the Davisson – Germer experiment, etc.

Crystals must be totally absent from our experiments. Reiteration: CRYSTALS MUST BE TOTALLY ABSENT FROM OUR EXPERIMENTS.

This signifies that:

For the experimental checking of Wave Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics Bragg’s law must never be employed.

In other words, in our experiment, the electrons that are emitted from their source should reach the screen without interference from any crystal during their course.
Unfortunately, no “pure diffraction experiments” (P.D.E.) have been carried out so far in order to have Wave Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics experimentally verified, which is a major omission for modern Physics.

Let us hope that such experiments (P.D.E.) will be conducted soon.
It is imperative that the above experiment be carried out so that we can establish if Wave Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics are two accurate or erroneous Theories of Physics.


Thanks,

Tony (C.A. Tsolkas)

papageno
2007-Nov-07, 09:36 PM
Let me quote myself:


Anyway, have a look at the classic video of single-electron interference: cheesy '70s educational movie (http://www.bo.imm.cnr.it/educational/main_educational.html).

Tim Thompson
2007-Nov-07, 09:42 PM
My opinion on the above question is NO!
In other words:
The electrons passing through the two slits S1 and S2 will fall directly onto screen S, without ever forming bright and dark fringes, as Wave Mechanics sates.
The experiment has already been done, using true double slits instead of crystal diffraction, and your "prediction" has already been falsified.

Young's Double-Slit Interference Observation of Hot Electrons in Semiconductors (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhRvL..91u6803F), Furuya, et al., Physical Review Letters 91(21): 216803, November 2003. Abstract: We have carried out Young’s double-slit experiment for the hot-electron wave in man-made semiconductor structures with a 25-nm-space double slit in an InP layer buried within GaInAs, a 190-nm-thick GaInAsP hot-electron wave propagation layer, and a collector array of 80nm pitch. At 4.2K, dependences of the collector current on the magnetic field were measured and found to agree clearly with the double-slit interference theory. The present results show evidence for the wave front spread of hot electrons using the three-dimensional state in materials, for the first time, and the possibility of using top-down fabrication techniques to achieve quantum wave front control in materials.

A detailed description of the experimental setup for the results reported above was later published here:

Double-Slit Interference Observation of Hot Electrons in Semiconductors - Analysis of Experimental Data (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JaJAP..44.2936F), Furuya, et al., Japanese Journal of Applied Physics 44(5A): 2936, May 2005. Abstract: This is a detailed description of the first definite observation of the double-slit interference of a hot electron in a solid. The observation has been achieved by fabricating a double-slit with a 12 nm opening and a 25 nm center-to-center distance and a detection electrode with a 40 nm width. Various inspections are made theoretically to confirm the double-slit diffraction/interference. This achievement will open the door to the creation of solid-state devices with new functions based on the wave nature of electrons.

Furthermore, the current issue of the American Journal of Physics includes a note describing how to fabricate nano-slits for a common electron microscope.

Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AmJPh..75.1053F), Frabboni, Gazzadi & Pozzi, American Journal of Physics 75(11): 1053-1055, November 2007. Abstract: In this short Note we report a method for producing samples containing two nano-sized slits suitable for demonstrating to undergraduate and graduate students the double-slit electron interference experiment in a conventional transmission electron microscope.

Neverfly
2007-Nov-07, 10:40 PM
(snip)

Thanks,

Tony (C.A. Tsolkas)



It must be a pride thing.

He just couldn't resist going for "recognition" and identified himself as a sock puppet. Fascinating.