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suntrack2
2007-Nov-08, 12:44 PM
I have heard that it is also going to celebrate in United States on a large scale, this festival is special and filled with entertainment. Here in India, the diwali means lot of purchasing, lot of eating, lot of movie looking, lot of lights, lot of and lot of, lot of and lot of cellphone speaking, guests crowd at home, their purchasing, lot of sideseeing, lot of picnics, lot of mountaineering, lot of hoteling, etc. People just bring a flood of money in the market this time.

You may be heard about the "diwali festival" (the festival of lights), so we celebrate this festival by lighting up the lights of clay pot, cotton cord and edible oil into it", we keep these lights almost for five days from today.

Since a joint family we celebrate this festival with lot of entertainment. Crackers are the main point in all the entertainment; I too enjoy the cracker’s noise with a "rocket launching through a glass bottle", and other crackers.

On this occasion we pray of the "god of wealth" i.e. Goddess Laxmi.

for children this festival is very famous and awesome, they wait for this festival after their mid term examinations over. My two daughters also enjoys with their friends some tiny crackers (whose noise is not a noise, just a very little crackers, I don't when that Nano crackers coming in the market).

We respect the elder people at this time, my sister will be take "a dish round to me in a cyclic movement of the hand by facing me including some 5 lights in the silver or golden dish, it is called in my language as "Owalnee", later we brothers give her some rupees for showing us the lights of that silver dish, and she normally place one red clay on my forehead, it is called in our language that is "tikka". You may say a avatar on the forehead in red colour.

01101001
2007-Nov-08, 02:01 PM
I have heard that it is also going to celebrate in United States on a large scale, this festival is special and filled with entertainment.

It's not quite as big a deal in the San Francisco Bay area as lunar new year, but I always notice activity at this time. Don't know what day it is exactly but there will soon be an evening when there is no street parking nearby. There are 4 or 5 indian families living here and it seems like they each get 20 or 30 cars full of visitors. A local store had a sign up for Diwali specials, so I knew it was coming. I'm sure it's a lot more visible where there are more Indians -- like 4 miles north of where I live.

I never see much in the way of lights though. I wish my Indian neighbors would decorate outside more, but maybe they don't want to stand out. Oil lights, you say? Maybe just as well. We don't need the fire hazard in dry California. They can keep them indoors.

Well, maybe I'll turn on my Christmas lights this week. I usually wait till our Thanksgiving holiday end of November, but they're just white lights, not real Christmasy, so they'll fit.

Happy Diwali to you.

mfumbesi
2007-Nov-08, 02:16 PM
Its big here in RSA, we have a relatively large Indian community.

suntrack2
2007-Nov-12, 06:24 AM
It's not quite as big a deal in the San Francisco Bay area as lunar new year, but I always notice activity at this time. Don't know what day it is exactly but there will soon be an evening when there is no street parking nearby. There are 4 or 5 indian families living here and it seems like they each get 20 or 30 cars full of visitors. A local store had a sign up for Diwali specials, so I knew it was coming. I'm sure it's a lot more visible where there are more Indians -- like 4 miles north of where I live.

I never see much in the way of lights though. I wish my Indian neighbors would decorate outside more, but maybe they don't want to stand out. Oil lights, you say? Maybe just as well. We don't need the fire hazard in dry California. They can keep them indoors.

Well, maybe I'll turn on my Christmas lights this week. I usually wait till our Thanksgiving holiday end of November, but they're just white lights, not real Christmasy, so they'll fit.

Happy Diwali to you.

Oh, I am really enjoying your posts here 01..., thanks for your observations of the neighbours :) We normally use here the crackers with no noise, and we have a plenty of open space in front of the home so it is not much of any kind trouble to the people means our "cracker tennis ball don't go away", it is within the stadium, because fireballs which are errupt from the craker is much dangerous for the homes of neighbour, so when I purchased the crakers I have already taken the interview of that shopkeeper and asked him that "are these crakers are dangerous", he said no, they are not, but sometime it may sounds like a audio cassette "dangerous". I said him no I don't want any sound into it, hence he finally gave me some sparkling crakers, and which can be only sparkels in only vertical way.

Yesterday we all the 20 bautmembers sorry, family members gone for the outing, it was not outing, it was just a "inning in the hotel". at ---Hotel Inn. in the evening. :) where we crack the rigid food by the hammer just like spoon and kata (kata is a marathi world, you can say it thorn, a steel spoon having 3 thorns on it.)

Thanks for giving us a happy diwali, and I am herewith giving you "Thanksgiving" in advance. Hehe.
Sunil

Fortunate
2007-Nov-12, 01:58 PM
Hi suntrack2,
Happy Diwali. A few years ago, I was in India at the time of Diwali. The night I caught my flight out of the airport at Delhi, a portion of the floor of the airport was decorated, and in the center of the decoration was a "candle" - not a painted image of a candle, but an actual lit candle. I may be wrong, but I think the traditional flame is contained in a clay pot with a wick and the "oil" is "ghee" (clarified butter).

I was told that Diwali was a celebration of the return of Ram (in the epic Ramayana, Ram goes into exile and returns after many years).

mahesh
2007-Nov-12, 05:33 PM
Isn't Diwali, a New Year, according to Hindu calendar? Like January 01?
Only because it's tied to lunar phases, it falls on different dates.

So the celebrations have the same intensity, as Christmas and New Year or Rosh Hashanah or Eid or any other religious/new year observation.

Or am I mistaken?

Happy Diwali, Sunil, and every one else.

every day's like Christmas....be happy

suntrack2
2007-Nov-13, 04:23 PM
thanks mahesh, mfmbesi and fortunate for your greetings, now I came in a final position of the finals of diwali, uptill I was in semi final, but from yesterday I came in the final, because the diwali is going to conclude for this year, later on we will celebrate the marriage of a Tulsi tree, yes marriage, because immediately post diwali we celebrate and decorate this tree just like a christmas tree, and also distribute some sweet items among the children. But Oh...my leave of 5 days is going to over on today, hence I am binding my holdol right now. When I get some leave I am too happy. Today the high decible sounds of the crakers are bringing a wide impact on the little babies, secondly the smoke of the crakers is not just easy to inhale.

Thanks once again, when I went to a western part of native place, the construction of the new church was almost in the final stage thereon, infact there was quite old church previously, but the new design is just great than the previous, there my most of the friends recalled our childhood. They have been invited to me for the christmas dinner party in advance. :)

mike alexander
2007-Nov-13, 05:05 PM
If the spread of diwali festivals in the United States means I can get access to more Indian cuisine, I'm enthusiastically in favor of it.

Neverfly
2007-Nov-13, 06:06 PM
If the spread of diwali festivals in the United States means I can get access to more Indian cuisine, I'm enthusiastically in favor of it.

you mean you are in flavor of it.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Nov-13, 06:13 PM
I went to some Indian Restaurant last week with friends. The food was great. I especially liked the thing with "Paneer" (Indian Cheese). Yum! :)

suntrack2
2007-Nov-14, 10:51 AM
I went to some Indian Restaurant last week with friends. The food was great. I especially liked the thing with "Paneer" (Indian Cheese). Yum! :)


That's great, paneer ! cheese like substance which normally add in the different vegitables alongwith big amount of masala into it. I think paneer support to increase the "fats and protins" in the body. In India there is a big understanding in many people, that if they eat more oily food, they do not have knee pains. :)

Thanks mike alexander for your taste of cuisines of India, I heard that most of the Indian went to abroad to do a Hotel Business, Indian veg, non veg, kofta, idly saambar, utthppa and other south Indian food. Utthappa is just like a American Burger food, and that's tasty along with some pickle and other souses.

mike alexander
2007-Nov-14, 10:37 PM
You're welcome, suntrack. Just give me a big plate of saag paneer with a pile of hot naan on the side and I'll be back for a second plate in about ten minutes. Add tandoori chicken and I won't be able to stand up at all afterwards.

Bolasanibk
2007-Nov-15, 09:48 AM
I have tried out a couple of Indian restaurants in the Bay Area and must say I was not really impressed by the standard of the food. Of course, you dont expect to get the same standard of food as back home.