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informant
2003-Jul-29, 11:54 AM
The Spirit ascends... (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030728.html) :)

kucharek
2003-Jul-29, 11:58 AM
The Spirit ascends... (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030728.html) :)
I really hope this time they do it without lithobreaking...

Russ
2003-Jul-29, 01:56 PM
Lithobreaking!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

You guys crack me up! :lol:

kucharek
2003-Jul-29, 02:02 PM
And that's how a car looks after dendrobraking (http://www.car-accidents.com/pics/carphotos/1-31-02.jpg)...

snowcelt
2003-Jul-29, 02:21 PM
I went into a church the last Sunday and I had to do some theobraking. It could have been worse, I could have seen the congregation bractiating.

ToSeek
2003-Jul-29, 02:28 PM
The Spirit ascends... (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030728.html) :)
I really hope this time they do it without lithobreaking...

Actually, you misspelled "lithobraking," but your spelling still seems more appropriate somehow. ;)

Doodler
2003-Jul-29, 02:41 PM
Given the impressive failure rate for Mars probes, should we start a poll on which of the current bunch are going to flop first?

ToSeek
2003-Jul-29, 04:59 PM
Given the impressive failure rate for Mars probes, should we start a poll on which of the current bunch are going to flop first?

The Japanese one is probably the best bet. It's limping already.

Raven_Tuoni
2003-Aug-03, 04:57 AM
um, if you consider lots of airbags surrounding the lander, which is dropped from 60 to 100 feet off the surface lithobraking, then yup

informant
2003-Aug-04, 10:08 AM
I think you missed the irony in kucharek's post.

man on the moon
2003-Aug-04, 12:32 PM
for those not familiar with the procedure (http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerobraking) (read the last paragraph especially :) )

tracer
2003-Aug-04, 02:38 PM
In lithobraking's defense, the Soviet space capsules that set down in Siberia all had to do some lithobraking. Even with parachutes, they were falling at 20+ miles per hour when they hit the ground. In fact, since they were lifting bodies, they were probably made to "flare" at the last second before touchdown (to reduce their vertical velocity) and skid along the ground for a few meters -- another kind of lithobraking.

kucharek
2003-Aug-04, 02:40 PM
Which do you mean? Lifting body? The Soyuz capsules fire retro-rockets shortly before touchdown.

tracer
2003-Aug-04, 03:50 PM
Really? I thought they were shaped like lifting bodies, the same way that the American Gemini and Apollo capsules were.

How do these landing "retro" rockets survive re-entry?

daver
2003-Aug-04, 10:13 PM
Really? I thought they were shaped like lifting bodies, the same way that the American Gemini and Apollo capsules were.

How do these landing "retro" rockets survive re-entry?

I don't know that i'd classify Apollo as a lifting body--it did generate some lift (glide ratio of about 1:3 as i recall) due to its CG being off-axis. I'm not sure that the same mechanism would apply to Soyuz; on the other hand, they did mention that the last landing was off-course due to it following a ballistic rather than semi-ballistic reentry.