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View Full Version : Icarus 2: birdman falls to earth



sarongsong
2003-Aug-01, 04:54 AM
"A 34-year-old Austrian mechanic became the first person ever to fly across the English Channel without the benefit of an aircraft... wearing only a specially-designed suit...Air traffic controllers had granted him a 30-minute window...for early morning to avoid problems with conventional air traffic.."
http://sg.news.yahoo.com/030731/1/3d0ih.html

=D>

freddo
2003-Aug-01, 05:12 AM
"Thats not flying! Thats falling.... With style."

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Aug-01, 05:15 AM
To infinity! And... whatnot.... :P

beskeptical
2003-Aug-01, 05:51 AM
Not to belittle the engineering, but it wasn't without an aircraft since he was launched from a plane wasn't he?

Humphrey
2003-Aug-01, 06:49 AM
That is awesome. I would love to skydive weith one of those on my back.
But first i need to learn to skydive.... :D

sarongsong
2003-Aug-01, 07:04 AM
Why it's as easy as...falling off a log.
Good point beskeptical---but it WAS a "giant step"!

AstroSmurf
2003-Aug-01, 07:05 AM
Really cool accomplishment, I thought. Wasn't there some early aviation award for flying across the channel in a plane? Though I think they had to go slightly longer than Dover-Calais.

On the subject of cool ways to fly, I like the idea of parasailing... parachute plus motor equals a very light aircraft. I'd like to try that some day, but regulations in Sweden are sorta strange - they group parasailing with other ultralights, so you have to know a whole slew of other stuff which is interesting but not useful while parasailing. Oh well, they'll probably create a separate license, any decade now...

kucharek
2003-Aug-01, 07:27 AM
Though it is cool, I've some technical problems. It was without an aircraft, but where does this begin. He wore some wings with a 1.80m span to achieve the necessary glide ratio. Without them, he wouldn't have done. He glided 35km from 9km, this gives a glide ratio of ~4. If my sources are correct, that's four times better than the shuttle.
IIRC, in the early days of paragliding, a ratio of 4 was already good. But pretty bad by todays standards.

sarongsong
2003-Aug-01, 07:42 AM
AstroSmurf:

Parasailing,,,but regulations in Sweden are sorta strange - they group parasailing with other ultralights...
How about a California vacation?
http://www.flytorrey.com/web/main/StudentsParamotor.asp

Astronot
2003-Aug-01, 02:03 PM
What Baumgartner accomplished is very daring and pretty cool, but he did launch from an airplane and had wings to glide with. It is really an extreme sport, not exploration. Compare this to Paul MacCready’s human powered planes the Gossamer Condor and the Gossamer Albatross that flew across the Channel. To me, this combination of engineering and human abilities stretches the boundaries of knowledge.

Jigsaw
2003-Aug-01, 03:15 PM
It is really an extreme sport, not exploration. What he said. The first thing that popped into my head when I heard he was going to do this was, "Yeah--but it's not the Gossamer Albatross", which impressed the heck out of me when they did it.

russ_watters
2003-Aug-01, 05:01 PM
Not to belittle the engineering, but it wasn't without an aircraft since he was launched from a plane wasn't he? Not to mention he did have WINGS.

I don't get it. What did he do that was at all unique?

One thing Re, glide ratio: Typical decent gliders get about 24:1, a really good glider near 30.

Pi Man
2003-Aug-01, 05:41 PM
WOAH! I gotta get me one of those! :lol:

mutant
2003-Aug-01, 06:47 PM
I saw that on tv this morning. That was so cool. My hat off to him. My gosh that would be exciting.

Pi Man
2003-Aug-01, 06:49 PM
Unless something went wrong... :o

sarongsong
2003-Aug-01, 07:33 PM
mutant:

I saw that on tv this morning
Haven't seen any video yet---did they show the landing and close-ups of the suit?

Avatar28
2003-Aug-01, 08:56 PM
The July issue of Popular Science has a whole article devoted to these guys. It's actually pretty cool.

The early generations of wingsuits killed 72 out of 75 people. You know it had to take some serious cajones the jump out in that thing the first time they did it.

The article's a pretty good read if you wanna check it out.

Sammy
2003-Aug-01, 09:30 PM
Of course we all know that this was a hoax, done as a hobby by the same guys who faked the moon landings....

Colt
2003-Aug-02, 12:09 AM
My only question is how did he land? He had to be going pretty fast..

If I had one of those I would strap a mini-jet to my back and use it in bursts. :wink: -Colt

Sammy
2003-Aug-02, 03:58 AM
My only question is how did he land? He had to be going pretty fast..

If I had one of those I would strap a mini-jet to my back and use it in bursts. :wink: -Colt

He popped a 'chute, the parawing type, and floated down to a nice landing.

sarongsong
2003-Aug-02, 06:01 AM
Colt:
He had to be going pretty fast...
"...At times he will reach speeds of 224mph (360km/h) in temperatures as low as -68C..."I want to be known as the God of the Skies"---Felix Baumgartner."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3106147.stm
Okay, Felix, but how about a little "g"--- just until you get a propulsion system? :D

mutant
2003-Aug-02, 07:13 AM
Sarongsong wrote:


Haven't seen any video yet---did they show the landing and close-ups of the suit?

Yes they did. He landed by deploying a standard parachute. Not a pretty landing but it worked. His suit looked like a cross between a spacesuit and a skydivers suit. He had a big helmet with an enclosed faceplate and a large harness around his chest holding the wing on. The wing was made of carbon fiber and had a span of 6 feet. He was actually gliding........it was so cool to watch.

sarongsong
2003-Aug-04, 01:49 AM
Hasta la vista!
http://www.nctimes.net/~jimbud/felix.jpg

Andreas
2003-Aug-04, 04:04 AM
One thing Re, glide ratio: Typical decent gliders get about 24:1, a really good glider near 30.
Are we talking sailplanes? Modern ones can be expected to have glide ratios in excess of 40. That's for typical performance gliders, not those specialized e.g. for aerobatics.

20 to 25 is about right for old wooden frame planes and modern motor gliders with their engine switched off.

Humphrey
2003-Aug-04, 05:25 AM
sarongsong: is that your face?

russ_watters
2003-Aug-04, 05:49 AM
One thing Re, glide ratio: Typical decent gliders get about 24:1, a really good glider near 30.
Are we talking sailplanes? Modern ones can be expected to have glide ratios in excess of 40. That's for typical performance gliders, not those specialized e.g. for aerobatics.

20 to 25 is about right for old wooden frame planes and modern motor gliders with their engine switched off. Yeah, you're right. I was low. Not sure where I got that from.

sarongsong
2003-Aug-04, 06:54 AM
Naw--I'm not that good-lookin'---it's actually "Air" Greenspan. A friend sent it to portray the U.S. economy and I didn't actually notice the paste-on til after it was posted. #-o

sarongsong
2003-Aug-09, 10:47 PM
"The SKYRAY consists of two sections: A harness with a rigid back-section and a wing. The harness is put on before the rig and lies underneath the parachute. It transfers the generated lift to the body of the skydiver. In this way arms and legs are free in their movements. SKYRAY can be maneuvered by shifting the center of lift and aerodynamically, using arms or legs. It has an airplane-like agility far beyond other concepts..."
http://www.freesky.de/SKYRAY.html
http://www.freesky.de/Other/SKYRAY2k.jpg

sarongsong
2004-Jun-10, 09:56 PM
Update---Wing Suits (http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=116&art_id=iol1086596785309B630 &set_id=1):
"...swooping cross-country to the target at about 90 mph laterally and just 40 mph vertically..."If you're an experienced skydiver, you have a mind attuned to working in seconds. You get 60 seconds of work from 13 000 feet (scorning the metric system, skydivers work determinedly in feet), and you become accustomed to putting a lot of things into that one minute. So you have a very accurate one-minute brain.
"But when you wing suit, you've suddenly got to get your skydiving brain to work for two to three minutes. You get to the point where you think you're going to be there forever."..."
http://www.avweb.com/newspics/wingsuit.jpg

sarongsong
2006-Jun-06, 03:03 PM
Air-raids!
June 6, 2006
Special forces to use strap-on 'stealth wings'...The technology was demonstrated...three years ago when Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner... famously 'flew' across the English Channel... Daily Mail (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=389357&in_page_id=1770)

Sammy
2006-Jun-06, 04:42 PM
Make the wings a bit bigger and add an anti-tank missile, "just in case..."

In a few years, they will probably add a portable john, beer cooler, and DVD player!

Doodler
2006-Jun-06, 05:14 PM
Make the wings a bit bigger and add an anti-tank missile, "just in case..."

In a few years, they will probably add a portable john, beer cooler, and DVD player!

Heh, if I ever do this, the attachable john is going to be a definite necessity.

Either that, or I ain't drinkin' ANYTHING at least 48 hours ahead of schedule...

farmerjumperdon
2006-Jun-06, 05:57 PM
The July issue of Popular Science has a whole article devoted to these guys. It's actually pretty cool.

The early generations of wingsuits killed 72 out of 75 people. You know it had to take some serious cajones the jump out in that thing the first time they did it.

The article's a pretty good read if you wanna check it out.

I'll have to check my skydiving history resources again, but I'm pretty sure it was 75 out of 75 died. Explains why it took so long for wingsuit flying to take off. It is pretty new stuff, very radical, very dangerous. The vertical descent speed is so slow that it is very dangerous because of the deception it creates. That being said, the folks at the cutting edge of wingsuit design are convinced they will be landable in less than 10 years. Some of the guys pushing the envelope are already landing parachutes of less than 50' square. That's a monstrous amount of wing loading and at really scary ground speeds compared to even relatively agressive canopy pilots. If the flare is not perfect - you die. Yes, it still takes some genuine cahunas. Those guys are to us normal skydivers what normal skydivers are to the general public.

Dragon Star
2006-Jun-06, 06:46 PM
http://www.avweb.com/newspics/wingsuit.jpg

Wait...I saw this in a movie, I can't remember what it was but 2 people were being chased to the top of a building and they jumped off using those, anyone remember the name?

farmerjumperdon
2006-Jun-07, 01:48 AM
Wait...I saw this in a movie, I can't remember what it was but 2 people were being chased to the top of a building and they jumped off using those, anyone remember the name?

Doesn't ring a bell, and I know most skydiving scenes. Not very realistic, but then Hollywood takes it's license. You couldn't outrun anybody wearing a wingsuit, it doesn't allow the legs to extend very far. And it can not be put on quickly.

sarongsong
2006-Jun-07, 04:13 AM
Wait...I saw this in a movie...anyone remember the name?I do recall seeing something like you describe (on TV), and searched IMDb (http://www.imdb.com/) , to no avail. Any more details/keywords come to mind?

farmerjumperdon
2006-Jun-07, 12:12 PM
There was a scene in Dropzone (with Wesley Snipes) in which they are searching for a friend and find him hanging out on the window washing rig of a skyscraper. The guy (nicknamed Swoop - can't get more Hollywood than that) is a bit nuerotic, and leaps off the building in front of his friend in what is intended to be perceived by the viewer as a suicide leap. Then he opens and everybody has a good laugh.

publiusr
2006-Jun-28, 04:44 PM
Wait...I saw this in a movie, I can't remember what it was but 2 people were being chased to the top of a building and they jumped off using those, anyone remember the name?

Rocky and Bullwinkle.

Thats what the guy looks like wearing his flying squirrel suit.

And I thought riding a Segway looked dumb.