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Fraser
2007-Nov-26, 04:00 PM
It's been a long journey, 64 episodes, but now we're back where we began: Pluto. Last time we talked about how Pluto lost its planethood status, so we won't go over all that again. This time we're going to talk about Pluto, its moons, the Kuiper belt, and the other icy objects that inhabit the outer Solar System.

<strong><a href="http://media.libsyn.com/media/astronomycast/AstroCast-071126.mp3">Episode 64: Pluto and the Icy Outer Solar System (12.6MB)</a></strong><br />&nbsp;<br /><br />&nbsp;<br />

Read the full blog entry (http://www.astronomycast.com/solar-system/episode-64-pluto-and-the-icy-outer-solar-system/)

Sticks
2007-Nov-26, 06:17 PM
I think I have found a slight error in the transcript

Near the end we have


Fraser: All right. I think we’ve got one last part of our tour of the solar system, and that will be next week, where we’ll talk about essentially the end of the solar system
– where we interact with the rest of the solar system.

The bit in italics should be Galaxy?

Galaxy
2007-Nov-26, 08:00 PM
I think I have found a slight error in the transcript

The bit in italics should be Galaxy?

Thanks Sticks. I fixed it.

-Rebecca

Tall Tree Light
2007-Dec-04, 11:15 PM
Pam and Fraser glossed over one of the things I was looking forward to learning in this episode. Specifically, what is the difference between the Ort Cloud and the Kuiper Belt?

Does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks,


TTL

DarkSamurai
2007-Dec-05, 04:59 AM
Well we know the Kuiper Belt is there, but the Oort cloud is just a postulated area where the really long term comets and other icy object reside.

It does get a little complex past Neptune with the Kuiper Belt, the Scattered disc, and the Oort cloud.

Fraser
2007-Dec-05, 06:30 PM
Right, the Oort cloud is just theoretical. That's where the long period comets seem to come from. I would assume that they're physically similar to Kuiper belt objects, since the long period comets are similar to other comets. The differences would probably be very interesting to astronomers, though.