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jamesabrown
2007-Nov-26, 05:24 PM
So I watched The Mist yesterday. I had read the novella by Stephen King years ago and enjoyed it thoroughly, and this movie followed the plot points step by step. Not one thing occurred in this movie that surprised me--with one huge exception I'll deal with later.

However, this movie thrilled me. I don't typically watch bug-gore flicks, so you more jaded movie-goers can commence with your eye-rolls here, Post Reply and tell me how lame I must be and that you fell asleep six times in the theater. I don't care. I loved it anyway. The cgi bugs were convincing and the drawn-out tension scenes (i.e., unreeling the rope out into the parking lot) were stretched out just long enough to make me squirm.

Personally, I'm glad the two stars didn't hook up as they did in the book. That was one point of the book that felt wrong for me.

Now for the one big change. Let me say, as a father of a young boy, I told myself that I would have made the same decision. When I saw how the director was veering from the book, after Dad had done it I suspected the twist ending was going to occur. When it did, I still felt wrung out. I had to keep telling myself, "This didn't really happen. This is just a movie." I trembled all the way to the parking lot, then went home and gave my son a huge hug, no explanations.

Doodler
2007-Nov-26, 06:32 PM
The early reviews coming back are giving the CGI work the highest marks for seamless integration. Apparently whatever they did, they did REALLY well.

Gillianren
2007-Nov-26, 06:47 PM
I have to say, Stephen King fan though I am, I never cared for the original and therefore have no real interest in seeing the movie. (Heck, I still haven't gotten around to seeing 1408, which I do like.) Can you PM me with the changes?

jamesabrown
2007-Nov-26, 07:30 PM
Can you PM me with the changes?

Done.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Nov-26, 10:35 PM
I haven't read much Stephen King, but I have read "The Mist", because it was one of the main literary inspirations for Silent Hill, especially the second game. (Another was Dean R. Koontz's Phantoms, which was very like the first game - which was the only interesting thing about it.)

According to King's introductory notes, "The Mist" is supposed to be enjoyed in a B-movie beer and popcorn sort of way. I certainly found it an entertaining read, and look forward to seeing the film.

(I also read Shawshank, BTW, which was gut-wrenchingly good.)

KaiYeves
2007-Nov-26, 10:39 PM
My dad made us listen to Lisey's Story on a car trip. Scared me bloody silly. Do not want anymore King after that experience. But the I thought of the part at the begining about a newpaper collum called "Yes, I'm Married to Him" a few months later when I said I wanted to write to Ann Druyan and he said "Who?"

Gillianren
2007-Nov-27, 05:05 AM
Can you PM me with the changes?

Done.

Thank you. You've also just reconfirmed my decision that I don't really want to see it; that ending sounds awful. (Though the thing about his wife depends on which version of the story you've read, apparently; it didn't happen in the first version of the story and did in the later, which is the only version I've read.) I didn't expect the original ending to be filmed, though.

Oh, and Paul, you might appreciate this story--he was, I believe, in a supermarket, and some woman came up to him and said she didn't read his work, because she didn't read horror. He pointed out that it isn't all he writes, citing--I can't remember which--either Shawshank or The Green Mile as an example, and a pretty good one whichever one it was. So the woman told him that he didn't write it.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Nov-27, 08:52 AM
Oh, and Paul, you might appreciate this story--he was, I believe, in a supermarket, and some woman came up to him and said she didn't read his work, because she didn't read horror. He pointed out that it isn't all he writes, citing--I can't remember which--either Shawshank or The Green Mile as an example, and a pretty good one whichever one it was. So the woman told him that he didn't write it.

Nice one - thanks for that!

This reminds me of a story told by Ian Rankin, the Scottish crime writer who wrote the Inspector Rebus books (which I intend to read any year soon). He set most of the books in and around his home city of Edinburgh, so that Rebus frequents the same pubs and so on as the author.

One evening, a somewhat domineering woman went into a particular pub, went up to the barman and asked if Inspector Rebus was in. The barman said, "I don't know about that, but Ian Rankin is sitting over there." So she went over to the person indicated and said, "Are you Ian Rankin?" He confirmed that he was. She shook her head and told him he couldn't be - her "reasoning" being that he was too unlike his creation. She insisted on seeing his passport, and when he told her he didn't have it on him, she asked to see his birth certificate or driving licence. Eventually he produced his credit card, which finally convinced her, although she clearly wasn't impressed.

jamesabrown
2007-Nov-27, 02:43 PM
(I also read Shawshank, BTW, which was gut-wrenchingly good.)

Agreed. The best movies made from Stephen King's work, in my opinion, are The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile. Both were directed by Frank Darabont. So imagine how pleased I was to learn that Mr. Darabont also directed The Mist. King and Darabont obviously have a psychic connection somehow.

Gillianren
2007-Nov-27, 07:12 PM
Frank Darabont's first film was a "dollar baby"--Stephen King will give beginning filmmakers rights to his works for a dollar. Frank Darabont did a version (which I've never seen, naturally) of "The Woman in the Room." Stephen King apparently thought it was quite good. Certainly Frank Darabont has done better by King than a lot of other directors. (For accuracy to the story, he did better than Kubrick!) However, it does sound like he gave The Mist a needless cliche ending.

KaiYeves
2007-Nov-27, 08:24 PM
What's with the new avatar, Paul? I'd come to associate the old one with you.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Nov-27, 11:30 PM
This is proving to be a fascinating thread. I don't usually know much about the behind-the-scenes (in the negotiation sense) stuff in films, and I usually care even less, but this is interesting. I still haven't seen the Shawshank movie, but I am now motivated to seek it out.


What's with the new avatar, Paul? I'd come to associate the old one with you.
Thanks for noticing! I'm going through a series of quick transformations, but I expect I'll settle on one soon. Maybe even the original Maria one...

"I'm not your Mary!" (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=u0lDhqyvRPM&feature=related)

Captain Kidd
2007-Nov-28, 12:43 AM
Frank Darabont's first film was a "dollar baby"--Stephen King will give beginning filmmakers rights to his works for a dollar. Frank Darabont did a version (which I've never seen, naturally) of "The Woman in the Room." Stephen King apparently thought it was quite good. Certainly Frank Darabont has done better by King than a lot of other directors. (For accuracy to the story, he did better than Kubrick!) However, it does sound like he gave The Mist a needless cliche ending.I read the full plot, and yeah, the ending is a step too far for me. I don't particularly like that type of ending.

Hmm, how to express it without spoiling, let's say a completely happy or completely sad ending would have been fine. This ending seems needless. To me, maybe others like that type of ending.

jamesabrown
2007-Nov-28, 02:42 AM
I read the full plot, and yeah, the ending is a step too far for me. I don't particularly like that type of ending.

Hmm, how to express it without spoiling, let's say a completely happy or completely sad ending would have been fine. This ending seems needless. To me, maybe others like that type of ending.

I certainly didn't like the movie ending, but it strongly affected me. The book's ending had a "light at the end of a long, dark tunnel" but I have to admit it would have made an underwhelming end to the movie.

So I guess the movie would have to end either with, "Whew! We're safe!" or else the ending they actually filmed. And despite what Gillianren said, the happy ending is the cliche. Perhaps because I was expecting the movie to end as the book did is the reason why the movie's ending surprised me and moved me so. Plus, as I said, the fact that I'm a father of a boy helped me to truly identify with the protag.

Dunno. What I do know is that I enjoyed the movie overall, even with the horrific ending, but this movie is certainly not for everyone.

SMEaton
2007-Nov-28, 02:48 AM
I haven't read the story or seen the movie, but is it in any way similar to The Fog? The "Mist" trailer gave me flashbacks of the recent "Fog" remake.

Gillianren
2007-Nov-28, 02:54 AM
This is proving to be a fascinating thread. I don't usually know much about the behind-the-scenes (in the negotiation sense) stuff in films, and I usually care even less, but this is interesting. I still haven't seen the Shawshank movie, but I am now motivated to seek it out.

Oh, it's well worth it. It and Green Mile are the two best King movie adaptations, though The Dead Zone (movie, not TV show) is pretty good, too.

Sometimes, the behind-the-scenes stuff is pretty interesting. I think Stephen King's gotten a little fussier about adaptations of his work by big studios ever since he had to sue to get his name off The Lawnmower Man.

Captain Kidd
2007-Nov-28, 03:05 PM
... runs off to read up on the story ...

Wow, no wonder he wanted his name off. Another prime example of the only similarity between book and film being the title and maybe the characters' names. Although in this case, I enjoyed The Lawnmower Man film. The original, the sequel however . . .

Hmm, looks like a case of New Line deciding to find a way to shoehorn his name onto the movie to increase sales.

</thread hijacking>

Don't get me wrong, the ending does sound very realistic, unlike some moving ending where the bad guy ends up still being alive or some such. I donno, I guess the ending is just a bit too much of needless violence for me. I'm getting old and sappy I guess. :)

KaiYeves
2007-Nov-28, 08:49 PM
I actually like happy endings, provided that nothing else in the story is cliched.

mike alexander
2007-Nov-29, 12:39 AM
Love the Leg Language, Paul.

How is it pronounced in Leg Language?

Paul Beardsley
2007-Nov-29, 11:31 AM
Love the Leg Language, Paul.
Thanks Mike. It took a while to find it!


How is it pronounced in Leg Language?
Lang de jham.

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-01, 08:33 PM
Here's a post that I made on another forum:

"On Monday night, I caught another radio station premiere movie, one that I had been looking forward to for quite some time. As it turned out, I was not disappointed as the final credits began to roll.

The Mist is based on one of my favorite works of Stephen King. It's a powerful and surprisingly thoughtful horror movie with solid acting and appropriately creepy FX and a rather unsettling new ending. The Mist was written and directed by Frank Darabont, who was also responsible for The Shawkshank Redemption and The Green Mile.

Rather fittingly it was foggy when I left the theater. I didn't see any sign of monsters, however."

The critics have been rather divided on this flick. They either loved it or hated it.

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/mist/

Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-01, 08:41 PM
I haven't read the story or seen the movie, but is it in any way similar to The Fog? The "Mist" trailer gave me flashbacks of the recent "Fog" remake.

The Mist is nothing like the original The Fog, which was a ghost story and which seems extremely dated to me nowadays.

Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-01, 08:46 PM
Certainly Frank Darabont has done better by King than a lot of other directors. (For accuracy to the story, he did better than Kubrick!) However, it does sound like he gave The Mist a needless cliche ending.

In what way was it a cliche?

http://www.horror.com/php/article-1806-1.html

http://www.wafflemovies.com/mist.html

Stephen King himself loved Darabont's tragically ironic ending.

http://www.horror.com/php/article-1810-1.html

Dave Mitsky

Gillianren
2007-Dec-01, 10:52 PM
In what way was it a cliche?

In the sense that it's been done before--but never well, because frankly, it's dumb.


Stephen King himself loved Darabont's tragically ironic ending.

Stephen King also thinks that he himself is a bad writer and that "The Breathing Method" is closer to horror than "Apt Pupil." In short, he can be wrong.

dockeen
2007-Dec-01, 10:53 PM
Funny thing here - I remember reading "The Mist" many years ago - remember some snippets of the story, some images, but I really don't remember much about how things came out.

I can't think of any other King book that is like that in my memory...

Wayne

KaiYeves
2007-Dec-01, 10:54 PM
Stephen King also thinks that he himself is a bad writer and that "The Breathing Method" is closer to horror than "Apt Pupil." In short, he can be wrong.
He said that he wanted to go on a sub-orbital flight, and I hope he was right about that, because it would be very good publicity for whatever company he would go with.

Doodler
2007-Dec-01, 11:04 PM
The Mist is nothing like the original The Fog, which was a ghost story and which seems extremely dated to me nowadays.

Dave Mitsky

Well, I'll thumbwrestle you on that one. Having seen the original Fog a dozen times, the end still gets me. Every. Stinking. Time. I thought it was a great ghost story that needed no redeux.

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-01, 11:07 PM
In the sense that it's been done before--but never well, because frankly, it's dumb.



Stephen King also thinks that he himself is a bad writer and that "The Breathing Method" is closer to horror than "Apt Pupil." In short, he can be wrong.

Not dumb at all, in my opinion. If you don't like unhappy endings, just say so.

So King can be wrong about what he personally likes? That's interesting to hear.

Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-01, 11:10 PM
Well, I'll thumbwrestle you on that one. Having seen the original Fog a dozen times, the end still gets me. Every. Stinking. Time. I thought it was a great ghost story that needed no redeux.

Please note that I said nothing more than the two stories are not even remotely similar and that the original The Fog seems quite dated, in my opinion. I haven't seen the remake and don't plan on doing so.

Dave Mitsky

Doodler
2007-Dec-01, 11:19 PM
Please note that I said nothing more than the two stories are not even remotely similar and that the original The Fog seems quite dated, in my opinion. I haven't seen the remake and don't plan on doing so.

Dave Mitsky

Sorry, the only point I intended to contend with was the datedness of the original Fog movie.

I thought it had aged pretty well, all things considered. It got along very well on pretty minimal effects work. While I'm all about the latest and greatest computer generated effects, and love to see them applied to new stories, or slipped in serreptitiously where old effects are truly obsolete, I think the existing model stands the test of time.

Its not a story that really needs phenomenal effects to work, its a great psychological horror piece that does more with what it suggests than what it shows.

Its definitely not the 'gore porn' of Saw or Hostel, but its better for it.

Noclevername
2007-Dec-02, 12:20 AM
Its definitely not the 'gore porn' of Saw or Hostel, but its better for it.

Hear, hear. There's only so many times you can see a gelatin "corpse" get cut up while spurting red dye #5 and still find it even remotely interesting, let alone scary.

Gillianren
2007-Dec-02, 01:05 AM
Not dumb at all, in my opinion. If you don't like unhappy endings, just say so.

No, not at all. I like intelligent unhappy endings just fine. I mean, my Gods, someone who likes Hamlet half so much as I cannot be said to dislike unhappy endings. This one is just pointless. It's not unhappy because that's the way the story's pointing; it's unhappy because someone thought it was a better idea than the ambiguous ending King left it with.


So King can be wrong about what he personally likes? That's interesting to hear.

He's wrong if he thinks it's tragically ironic, certainly.

Captain Kidd
2007-Dec-02, 07:09 AM
No, not at all. I like intelligent unhappy endings just fine. I mean, my Gods, someone who likes Hamlet half so much as I cannot be said to dislike unhappy endings. This one is just pointless. It's not unhappy because that's the way the story's pointing; it's unhappy because someone thought it was a better idea than the ambiguous ending King left it with.Yeah, that's what I was getting at with my earlier comments. Hard to without spoiling the ending. The original ambigous ending would have been a good ending in my opinion. This one seems to try too much to make a more defined, less ambigious, ending that's "sad" too.

Grr. I'm not going to fix any ttypos or grammer errors this time around, for some reason my computer has lagged to the point aht I'm typing half a post ahead of the screen showing it. Time for a reboot.

Doodler
2007-Dec-02, 01:35 PM
Hear, hear. There's only so many times you can see a gelatin "corpse" get cut up while spurting red dye #5 and still find it even remotely interesting, let alone scary.

Oh, and another advantage of that.

You can watch it on basic cable when it comes around without it being carved into a trailer because of the censors.

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-02, 08:51 PM
No, not at all. I like intelligent unhappy endings just fine. I mean, my Gods, someone who likes Hamlet half so much as I cannot be said to dislike unhappy endings. This one is just pointless. It's not unhappy because that's the way the story's pointing; it's unhappy because someone thought it was a better idea than the ambiguous ending King left it with.

He's wrong if he thinks it's tragically ironic, certainly.

King didn't call the new ending tragically ironic, I did. The fact remains that King liked Darabont's ending better than the ending that he wrote for the novella and has said so in public.

"Just last week Stephen King was out promoting The Mist and at a press conference (via Cinema Blend) he went on record as publicly saying that he approved of and even "loved" the new ending. Here's King's official statement:

Frank wrote a new ending that I loved. It is the most shocking ending ever and there should be a law passed stating that anybody who reveals the last 5 minutes of this film should be hung from their neck until dead.

It's rare that authors really go out and state that they approve of a movie to begin with, but to say they approve of and even loved a massive change, especially to the ending, is pretty incredible. This means quite a damn bit for Frank Darabont and The Mist. Although a different genre, Alan Moore won't even acknowledge that his graphic novels (V for Vendetta or Watchmen) are adapted. And this statement coming from someone as well-known and powerful as Stephen King is definitely a good thing."

http://www.propeller.com/viewstory/2007/11/19/stephen-king-approves-of-the-mists-new-ending/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.firstshowing.net%2F2007%2F11 %2F19%2Fstephen-king-approves-of-the-mists-new-ending%2F&frame=true

Dave Mitsky

Gillianren
2007-Dec-02, 10:21 PM
Yes, but Stephen King generally has a poor opinion of his own work; I'm not surprised to find that he prefers someone else's version of his story--especially Frank Darabont, with whom he's worked successfully before. Now, obviously, it isn't always the case (see also The Lawnmower Man, though that can't remotely be said to be a "version" of his story), but the fact is, you're not going to convince me that King's ending isn't better. Neither is he.

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-03, 05:27 AM
Fine and you won't convince me of your point of view either.

Dave Mitsky

jamesabrown
2007-Dec-03, 02:47 PM
Yes, but Stephen King generally has a poor opinion of his own work; I'm not surprised to find that he prefers someone else's version of his story--especially Frank Darabont, with whom he's worked successfully before. Now, obviously, it isn't always the case (see also The Lawnmower Man, though that can't remotely be said to be a "version" of his story), but the fact is, you're not going to convince me that King's ending isn't better. Neither is he.

This a curious position given that you've stated you didn't like the novel and you have no intention of seeing the movie. I'm not saying your position is wrong, I'm just saying it's curious.

I think both endings work perfectly. The novel's ending works for the novel. The movie's ending works for the movie. I think the novel's ending in the movie would have been an underwhelming disappointment.

Put me on the side with Stephen King. I'm recommending this movie to everyone I know, particularly if they are fans of King's work.

Gillianren
2007-Dec-03, 07:47 PM
This a curious position given that you've stated you didn't like the novel and you have no intention of seeing the movie. I'm not saying your position is wrong, I'm just saying it's curious.

I think both endings work perfectly. The novel's ending works for the novel. The movie's ending works for the movie. I think the novel's ending in the movie would have been an underwhelming disappointment.

Put me on the side with Stephen King. I'm recommending this movie to everyone I know, particularly if they are fans of King's work.

My problems with the original work (it isn't a novel; it's a novella at most) have nothing to do with the ending, which I think is the best ending these characters can get. And, of course, half the reason I've no intention of seeing the movie is that the ending is ridiculously corny. I wasn't sure, before I found that out. Mostly, it's that I prefer Stephen King's more thoughtful stories, not just giant bugs from (presumably; the characters have no way of knowing for sure) another dimension.

I'm also enough of a purist that, in my opinion, if you can't make a major aspect of the plot of a source work on screen, you shouldn't adapt it to screen in the first place.

Dave Mitsky
2007-Dec-03, 08:23 PM
Gillianren,

It would only be fair to actually see The Mist before passing judgment on the "ridiculously corny, cliche" ending.

Dave Mitsky

jamesabrown
2007-Dec-03, 10:00 PM
My problems with the original work (it isn't a novel; it's a novella at most) have nothing to do with the ending, which I think is the best ending these characters can get. And, of course, half the reason I've no intention of seeing the movie is that the ending is ridiculously corny. I wasn't sure, before I found that out. Mostly, it's that I prefer Stephen King's more thoughtful stories, not just giant bugs from (presumably; the characters have no way of knowing for sure) another dimension.

Again, I'm not trying to dogpile on you; I'm trying to understand your position. You say you don't like SK's monster stories, and as Mist qualifies as one of those, you didn't like the novella--but you did like the ending. Likewise, you don't like SK's monster movies for the same reason, PLUS you think the ending is 'corny and pointless.' Not that all unhappy endings are corny and pointless--just this one in particular.

I suppose this would be similar to me saying, "I can't stand Shakespeare, and the ending of Hamlet is particularly bad. I mean come on, the hero gets killed exactly as the villains planned it? How lame can you get?"


I'm also enough of a purist that, in my opinion, if you can't make a major aspect of the plot of a source work on screen, you shouldn't adapt it to screen in the first place.

I guess I'm enough of a realist to acknowledge that condensing multi-page novels into movies is tough enough without taking liberties. What movie would you praise for following the source text precisely? Plus, it has to be mentioned--not all novels make workable movies. Stephen King's Gerald's Game would make a very uninteresting movie, in my opinion. Watch a half-naked woman strapped to a bed for two hours while her imagination runs wild? With about twelve words of dialogue? No thanks. Maybe as a indie-aspiring grad-student project, but for a major release? I doubt it will ever happen unless some serious plot changes are made. But that doesn't take away from the novel itself, which I enjoyed.

What rankles me is when I read a review that says, for instance, "I can't stand epic fantasy, and this latest novel is a perfect example of why not." If you're going to approach the genre squinty-eyed and arms viciously crossed, well, don't expect me to give your opinion much weight.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Dec-03, 10:54 PM
multi-page novels
I much prefer single-page novels - they are so much quicker to get through!

Flippancy aside, that was a thoughtful post.

My main issue is with films (and any other adaptation) being faithful to its source material (usually a book or short story).

It occurred to me that an adaptation would be best judged as a response to the source material. Few adaptations follow the original work closely, but there are good reasons and bad reasons why that is.

The main good reason is that a scene that works in print might not work so well in film.

Bad reasons include: the film maker has not understood the original text, or has decided he knows better.

Alternatively, the film maker might be setting out to tell a story that is inspired by an existing work. I think Blade Runner got away with doing this partly because it was very good in its own right, and partly because it wasn't actually called Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?

Gillianren
2007-Dec-04, 04:50 PM
Again, I'm not trying to dogpile on you; I'm trying to understand your position. You say you don't like SK's monster stories, and as Mist qualifies as one of those, you didn't like the novella--but you did like the ending. Likewise, you don't like SK's monster movies for the same reason, PLUS you think the ending is 'corny and pointless.' Not that all unhappy endings are corny and pointless--just this one in particular.

Well, after all, I do know how the movie ends. And, yeah, I did like the ending of the original novella. I liked the idea that there was a possibility of a solution, but it wasn't as simple as, say, the Army rolling in. And Gods know there's plenty of unhappy endings aside from the movie version that are corny and pointless; I don't want to seem as though I'm just pointing a finger at this. I think, however, that the film's ending is a copout. I think we've seen it before, and I don't think it's ever been done well. I don't think it can be done well, but I also think it fails to ring true with the character that King established. I think he would choose a chance at life for his son, no matter how slim.


I suppose this would be similar to me saying, "I can't stand Shakespeare, and the ending of Hamlet is particularly bad. I mean come on, the hero gets killed exactly as the villains planned it? How lame can you get?"

I don't see that at all, actually. In Hamlet, by the fifth act, there is no other possible solution. By his own actions--and inactions--Hamlet has worked himself into a corner wherein he must die for the story to be fulfilled, and any other ending would be cheating. Remember, please, that my problem with "The Mist" and what I understand to be true of the film adaptation are actually two different things. My problem with "The Mist" has more to do with its concept, and so no, I probably wouldn't have seen the movie anyway. However, in changing the ending, they presented me with what I believe to be a problem with how the characters interact with their universe, which is entirely different. I just don't believe that the main character would behave the way he does in the end, and I think that the deus ex machina which follows is ridiculous and unnecessary; if he is to make the sacrifice he does, let it mean something.

There is a very strong morality in Stephen King's writing. It's not that there's no pointless death, and I don't want to imply that there is. However, each death can be made to serve a higher purpose. The pointless deaths in, say, The Stand lead up to the morality play that is the whole point of the story, for example. I feel that the movie ending of The Mist takes away from that and just gives us an ending that we can believe is ironic, whether it actually meets the definition of the word or not.


I guess I'm enough of a realist to acknowledge that condensing multi-page novels into movies is tough enough without taking liberties. What movie would you praise for following the source text precisely? Plus, it has to be mentioned--not all novels make workable movies. Stephen King's Gerald's Game would make a very uninteresting movie, in my opinion. Watch a half-naked woman strapped to a bed for two hours while her imagination runs wild? With about twelve words of dialogue? No thanks. Maybe as a indie-aspiring grad-student project, but for a major release? I doubt it will ever happen unless some serious plot changes are made. But that doesn't take away from the novel itself, which I enjoyed.

Right. But because it would make a bad movie as written, they shouldn't make it into a movie. Where is it written, after all, that every good work of literature--or even just pulp writing, if you want to listen to King's opinion of his own work--should be made into a movie? I'm not saying that liberties can't be taken. I'm aware, for example, that they had to cut almost all of the backstory out of The Princess Bride because otherwise the movie would be about twelve hours long. However, you don't need the backstory in order to make a workable movie. Removing bits that don't drive the story as much is different from changing things because you don't think they can be filmed. And, in fact, there are changes that get made to books wherein I believe it's acceptable. But, so far as I'm concerned, if you can't make a decent film without changing major plot points--such as, yes, the ending--you should look elsewhere for source material.


What rankles me is when I read a review that says, for instance, "I can't stand epic fantasy, and this latest novel is a perfect example of why not." If you're going to approach the genre squinty-eyed and arms viciously crossed, well, don't expect me to give your opinion much weight.

And that's fine. But again, I'm not arguing against the movie because it's a Stephen King giant bugs movie--or, indeed, a giant bugs movie at all; it doesn't need to be Stephen King to fail to interest me. Were that all, I might have merely commented that I don't like giant bugs movies and moved on. However, they have changed the bits that do interest me, the character interaction, and that bothers me.

Fazor
2007-Dec-04, 06:48 PM
I have to say, Stephen King fan though I am, I never cared for the original and therefore have no real interest in seeing the movie. (Heck, I still haven't gotten around to seeing 1408, which I do like.) Can you PM me with the changes?

Late, like usual, but I think it's funny that you say that. I know we've spoken breifly before about King, and I know my view of him differes very much so from yours. But the Mist was one of my favorite shorts from him. Like most of the other stuff I've read, there were some "flaws" (wrong word I suppose, but just elements that really bugged me). But overall, I liked it.

Although I have no interest in seeing the movie either. I just feel like there's no possible way that actually seeing the events on screen could be as suspensfull as it was reading about them. Besides, my intense dislike for movie-going means I only go see things that I really, really want to see. (I haven't even seen the Simpsons movie yet, and I can practically recite most of the episodes by heart).

publiusr
2007-Dec-07, 11:23 PM
Now that I'm older, landscapes terrify me. Like the most dangerous roads link here somewhere. Still images of large waves in black and white. Aspects of The Fog and the Shining.

The Mist is a wonderful movie.

karcreat
2008-Feb-20, 10:56 AM
Greetings, All....;)

New here, but wanted to let those fans of the ORIGINAL ending (such as myself) to the great King novella 'The Mist' know that there is a Fan Edit version ('The Novella Cut') being worked on that will adhere more closely to the structure/tone of the source material...not that Frank Darabont didn't MOSTLY do a great job on this movie, but that ending...hell, it just COMPLETELY alters the message and the feelings you are left with after the story wraps up...;)

Anyway, check out my site for more info and please leave feedback or email me with thoughts on the project, would love to hear from you all...

http://www.karcreat.com/MistNovellaCut.html

Thanks!
Kevin Karstens
kkarstens@cableone.net