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Fraser
2007-Nov-28, 09:34 PM
Like a baseball struck by a bat, there's a neutron star out there that's going, going, gone. Discovered using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the neutron star appears to be the result of a lopsided supernova explosion. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/11/28/neutron-star-seen-hurtling-out-of-the-milky-way/)

iantresman
2007-Nov-29, 01:51 PM
Here's is Winkler and Petre's published article, and Chandra press release:

Direct Measurement of Neutron Star Recoil in the Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant Puppis A (http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v670n1/20982/brief/20982.abstract.html),
The Astrophysical Journal, 670:635-642, 2007 November 20 , P. Frank Winkler, Robert Petre (arxiv.org version (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0608205))
Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball (http://chandra.harvard.edu/press/07_releases/press_112807.html) (November 28, 2007)

Do I understand correctly that:

The "pulsar" has an "apparent lack of pulsations"?
The oxygen-rich ejecta is characterised with filamentary structure and knots?
The oxygen-rich cloud is ionized (negatively) and moving north-west. The neutron core ("presumed", RX J08224300) may have a hydrogen atmosphere (presumably ionized positively), and moving south-east. (see the Arxiv.org paper (http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0608205)), though other papers suggest it is hydrogen deficient,[ref (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003astro.ph..7304A)]

I also note that:

The x-ray emission from the core is derived from the synchrotron process [ref (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003astro.ph..7304A)]

Jerry
2007-Nov-29, 08:38 PM
A supernova event ejecting an energetic object from a galaxy? Newton's law tells us an equal mass/energy is moving in the opposite direction. So was this supernova explosion a binary event? Do I dare ask if this ejected cannonball will absorb gas, evolving into badly gravitationally redshifted broadline emitter?

antoniseb
2007-Nov-29, 08:54 PM
Do I dare ask if this ejected cannonball will absorb gas, evolving into badly gravitationally redshifted broadline emitter?

You seem to have asked, so I suppose that you dared do it.
How much gas do you think it would absorb, traveling through the interstellar medium? How gravitationally redshifted do you think it will be? I think the idea that this would be observable as a redshifted emitter is pretty low.

trinitree88
2007-Nov-29, 09:30 PM
You seem to have asked, so I suppose that you dared do it.
How much gas do you think it would absorb, traveling through the interstellar medium? How gravitationally redshifted do you think it will be? I think the idea that this would be observable as a redshifted emitter is pretty low.

Antoniseb. As you readily know this is all my stuff from numerous previous posts. That neutron stars have high transverse velocities is old hat. That they exceed escape velocity from a galaxy is old hat..(~450-600 km/sec)...depending upon galaxy size and SN location. That they also create a halo around galaxies is old hat..(~1-10,000 per galaxy). That they give redshifted spectra due to the high gravitational redshift (also quoted by Roger Penrose recently as high as 40 % ..) is old hat. That they can find extended gas clouds light years in length and give redshifts for millenia is old hat. That they can run out of gas clouds and disappear (as many quasars have)...all old hat. Said so in 1981. Wrote it up. Wrote it up again at MIT in 1991. Gave a talk on it at the AAPT at Vassar in 92, joint APS/AAPT at Williams in "93", again at the NE AAPT at Harvard in 94 (Matt the sexiest man alive & his comrade Ben Affleck in the back row talk), again at Norwich in "99", and at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 2005. Old hat, Old hat, Old hat, Old hat, and Old hat. I suppose People magazine will have Matt & Ben (golfers with a family friend) the creators of all my talks too...not just the purveyors of my life story for the script for GWH. ( I was the first to solve the SN problem using Leinson and Oraevskii's secondary scattering mechanistics, and the recent parity experiment results from MIT's He-3 experiment at the Bates Linear accelerator the previous summer during my NSF-sponsored T.R.A.C. Fellowship there. You can of course ask the lab's directors, former or present, Peter Demos, Wade Sapp, Rich Milner...all of whom know me a bit, or bill Bertozzi, director of MIT's Nuclear Interaction Group...(and No, they're not dropping NIG for political correctness). I've seen manure piled thrity feet deep on some farms, but it isn't anything compared to what passes for the truth in some places. pete.

KaiYeves
2007-Nov-29, 10:15 PM
I first read that as "Neutron Star Seen Hurting..."

antoniseb
2007-Nov-30, 02:00 PM
...That they give redshifted spectra due to the high gravitational redshift (also quoted by Roger Penrose recently as high as 40 % ..) is old hat....
True, well oldish hat anyway. However up to 20-40% redshift is a far cry from z=5. I had the sense that Jerry was trying to open the door for these things being an alternate explanation for quasars, and so presented a single strong argument against the idea. Note also that the brightest isolated neutron stars (aside from the very newest ones in the Crab and Vela nebulas) are far dimmer in the optical range than huge numbers of quasars with redshifts way over z=0.5.

JustAFriend
2007-Nov-30, 02:14 PM
... or the exhaust plume of the First Federation's first extragalactic colonization probe???

(Hey we gotta give the ConspiracyTheory nuts something to work with...)

;-))