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View Full Version : T-scope questions



digitalspector
2003-Aug-10, 09:20 AM
I am sure this has been asked plenty o' times.

But I was curious on any recommendations on good quality, nice price scopes that are good for some nice astro-photography.

Also what size/power scope would be needed to view mars..... With my current one...barely make out any definition.

Purely curious as to what the current recommendations are.

Thanks a mil

Kaptain K
2003-Aug-10, 09:57 AM
Also what size/power scope would be needed to view mars..... With my current one...barely make out any definition.
1) What is your "current one"? :-?
2) What is your price range? :o

glen chapman
2003-Aug-10, 11:47 AM
Good views of Mars are a mute point. From personal experience, sacrfice size for focal length. I've got an eight inch dob F6 - even stopping down did jack for the view. A friend with a ten inch dob F4.5 did even worse.

Glen

aurorae
2003-Aug-10, 02:52 PM
With my current one...barely make out any definition.



That sounds like Mars alright. :wink:

Things that will help include longer focal lengths, high quality optics, high quality eyepieces, filters. But these will mostly be subtle. Probably the best thing to do is travel somewhere south where Mars can be viewed when overhead.

mike alexander
2003-Aug-11, 05:30 PM
Things that will help include longer focal lengths, high quality optics, high quality eyepieces, filters. But these will mostly be subtle. Probably the best thing to do is travel somewhere south where Mars can be viewed when overhead

Agreed. Wait as late as you can, when Mars is highest. Seeing is as much a key as scope. I have a trick if the moon is up. Focus on the limb; if you see any rippling in the line of the limb, odds of seeing Mars well are small.

Styro
2003-Aug-13, 02:20 PM
I have been getting good views of Mars in my little 4.5" dobsonian telescope at around 180x. I can clearly see the southern polar region and areas of darkness on the rest of the planet (somewhat similar to the maria on the moon). One difficulty you may be having is that you expect Mars to have as much detail as Jupiter or Saturn. Mars is pretty featureless compared to those two. You can only really expect an orangish blob with some areas of darkness, and a white area at the pole. However, the more you look at it, the more detail you will be able to pick out. It will also help to get a map of Mars and try to identify the area you are looking at.
As for a telescope for astrophotography, I am not as certain since I have never done any astrophotography yet. It is a very pricey hobby if you want good equipment. Most people I know into that have SCTs. You absolutely need to have a very stable mount and one that electronically tracks. For a reasonably priced scope, check out Orion (www.telescope.com). Their largest SCT is the SkyView Pro 127 EQ. For larger SCTs, try Celestron (www.celestron.com) and look for a local dealer. My telescope is an Orion and I have been very pleased with it and have heard very good reviews about the quality of their and Celestron's scopes. If you are more into visual work, however, a reflector is a much more economic choice as you can get twice the telescope for the same price as an SCT (at the expense of size and weight).
HTH