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View Full Version : Could Nitrogen Pollution Give Tropical Flora a Much Needed Boost?



Fraser
2008-Feb-07, 03:20 AM
Global warming and subsequent climate change is directly linked with human activity on our planet. The greenhouse effect is amplified by our need for energy, burning fossil fuels and pumping vast quantities of CO2 into our atmosphere. To make things worse, the plants that form the Earth's "lungs" in the tropics are being destroyed on [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/02/06/could-nitrogen-pollution-give-tropical-flora-a-much-needed-boost/)

Noclevername
2008-Feb-07, 05:16 AM
The question I have is, how sustainable is that growth, and how useful in terms of CO2? Will we get a lot of fast-growing but short-lived plants, or will larger carbon-sucking trees start to shoot up faster?

trinitree88
2008-Feb-10, 04:13 PM
The majority of our oxygen comes from phytoplankton in the oceans, not land plants. Should a virus evolve that kills chloroplasts in phytoplankton, that carbon sink will diminish, along with the marine food chain. Red and brown algae might survive and evolve to fill the niche. Perhaps there's a good science fair project there.... :shifty: pete

see:http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=17405

Argos
2008-Feb-11, 01:10 PM
I wonder why the boreal forests are never mentioned in these studies... I think they occupy an area larger than the combined equatorial forests in the world. Im yet to be convinced the Amazon et al play the starring role in the Climate Change drama.

trinitree88
2008-Feb-11, 07:42 PM
I wonder why the boreal forests are never mentioned in these studies... I think they occupy an area larger than the combined equatorial forests in the world. Im yet to be convinced the Amazon et al play the starring role in the Climate Change drama.


Argos. Organic chemistry has a rule of thumb...~double the reaction rate for ~ every 10 degrees Fahrenheit...so the warm, long growing season of the tropics, and the tepid tropical waters produce a disproportionate amount of carbon fixing relative to their surface areas. In a greenhouse the ideal growing temperature runs around 80 degrees for a large number of plants, except for a few families...and that translates into money at the checkout window. ciao. pete

Noclevername
2008-Feb-11, 07:51 PM
I wonder why the boreal forests are never mentioned in these studies... I think they occupy an area larger than the combined equatorial forests in the world. Im yet to be convinced the Amazon et al play the starring role in the Climate Change drama.

It's an ensemble cast, every actor contributes something to the plot.